• We present an exploration of the mass structure of a sample of 12 strongly lensed massive, compact early-type galaxies at redshifts $z\sim0.6$ to provide further possible evidence for their inside-out growth. We obtain new ESI/Keck spectroscopy and infer the kinematics of both lens and source galaxies, and combine these with existing photometry to construct (a) the fundamental plane (FP) of the source galaxies and (b) physical models for their dark and luminous mass structure. We find their FP to be tilted towards the virial plane relative to the local FP, and attribute this to their unusual compactness, which causes their kinematics to be totally dominated by the stellar mass as opposed to their dark matter; that their FP is nevertheless still inconsistent with the virial plane implies that both the stellar and dark structure of early-type galaxies is non-homologous. We also find the intrinsic scatter of their FP to be comparable to the local value, indicating that variations in the stellar mass structure outweight variations in the dark halo in the central regions of early-type galaxies. Finally, we show that inference on the dark halo structure -- and, in turn, the underlying physics -- is sensitive to assumptions about the stellar initial mass function (IMF), but that physically-motivated assumptions about the IMF imply haloes with sub-NFW inner density slopes, and may present further evidence for the inside-out growth of compact early-type galaxies via minor mergers and accretion.
  • We present a new sample of strong gravitational lens systems where both the foreground lenses and background sources are early-type galaxies. Using imaging from HST/ACS and Keck/NIRC2, we model the surface brightness distributions and show that the sources form a distinct population of massive, compact galaxies at redshifts $0.4 \lesssim z \lesssim 0.7$, lying systematically below the size-mass relation of the global elliptical galaxy population at those redshifts. These may therefore represent relics of high-redshift red nuggets or their partly-evolved descendants. We exploit the magnifying effect of lensing to investigate the structural properties, stellar masses and stellar populations of these objects with a view to understanding their evolution. We model these objects parametrically and find that they generally require two S\'ersic components to properly describe their light profiles, with one more spheroidal component alongside a more envelope-like component, which is slightly more extended though still compact. This is consistent with the hypothesis of the inside-out growth of these objects via minor mergers. We also find that the sources can be characterised by red-to-blue colour gradients as a function of radius which are stronger at low redshift -- indicative of ongoing accretion -- but that their environments generally appear consistent with that of the general elliptical galaxy population, contrary to recent suggestions that these objects are predominantly associated with clusters.
  • The South Pole Telescope has discovered one hundred gravitationally lensed, high-redshift, dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We present 0.5" resolution 870um Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array imaging of a sample of 47 DSFGs spanning z=1.9-5.7, and construct gravitational lens models of these sources. Our visibility-based lens modeling incorporates several sources of residual interferometric calibration uncertainty, allowing us to properly account for noise in the observations. At least 70% of the sources are strongly lensed by foreground galaxies (mu_870um > 2), with a median magnification mu_870um = 6.3, extending to mu_870um > 30. We compare the intrinsic size distribution of the strongly lensed sources to a similar number of unlensed DSFGs and find no significant differences in spite of a bias between the magnification and intrinsic source size. This may indicate that the true size distribution of DSFGs is relatively narrow. We use the source sizes to constrain the wavelength at which the dust optical depth is unity and find this wavelength to be correlated with the dust temperature. This correlation leads to discrepancies in dust mass estimates of a factor of 2 compared to estimates using a single value for this wavelength. We investigate the relationship between the [CII] line and the far-infrared luminosity and find that the same correlation between the [CII]L_FIR ratio and Sigma_FIR found for low-redshift star-forming galaxies applies to high-redshift galaxies and extends at least two orders of magnitude higher in Sigma_FIR. This lends further credence to the claim that the compactness of the IR-emitting region is the controlling parameter in establishing the "[CII] deficit."
  • We present spectroscopic confirmation of nine moderate redshift galaxy groups and poor clusters selected from the ROSAT Deep Cluster Survey. The groups span the redshift range z=0.23-0.59 and have between 4 and 20 confirmed members. The velocity dispersions of these groups range from 125 to 650 km/s. Similar to X-ray groups at low redshift, these systems contain a significant number of early-type galaxies. Therefore, the trend for X-ray luminous groups to have high early-type fractions is already in place by at least z=0.5. In 4 of the 9 groups, the X-ray emission is clearly peaked on the most luminous early-type galaxy in the group. However, in several cases the central galaxy is composed of multiple luminous nuclei, suggesting that the brightest group galaxy may still be undergoing major mergers. In at least 3 of the groups in our sample, a dominant early-type galaxy is not found at the center of the group potential. This suggests that many of our groups are not dynamically evolved despite their high X-ray luminosities. While similar systems have been identified at low redshift, the X-ray luminosities of the intermediate redshift examples are one to three orders of magnitude higher than those of their low redshift counterparts. We suggest that this may be evidence for group downsizing: while massive groups are still in the process of collapsing and virializing at intermediate redshifts, only low-mass groups are in the process of forming at the present day.
  • Compact groups of galaxies recently have been discovered in association with several strong gravitational lens systems. These groups provide additional convergence to the lensing potential and thus affect the value of H_0 derived from the systems. Lens system time delays are now being measured with uncertainties of only a few percent or better. Additionally, vast improvements are being made in incorporating observational constraints such as Einstein ring structures and stellar velocity dispersions into the lens models. These advances are reducing the uncertainties on H_0 to levels at which the the effects of associated galaxy groups may contribute significantly to the overall error budget. We describe a dedicated multiwavelength program, using Keck, HST, and Chandra, to find such groups and measure their properties. We present, as a case study, results obtained from observations of the CLASS lens system B1608+656 and discuss the implications for the value of H_0 derived from this system.
  • We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of supernova (SN) 2002cx, which reveal it to be unique among all observed type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). SN 2002cx exhibits a SN 1991T-like premaximum spectrum, a SN 1991bg-like luminosity, and expansion velocities roughly half those of normal SNe Ia. Photometrically, SN 2002cx has a broad peak in the $R$ band and a plateau phase in the $I$ band, and slow late-time decline. The $(B - V)$ color evolution is nearly normal, but the $(V - R)$ and $(V - I)$ colors are very red. Early-time spectra of SN 2002cx evolve very quickly and are dominated by lines from Fe-group elements; features from intermediate-mass elements (Ca, S, Si) are weak or absent. Mysterious emission lines are observed around 7000 \AA\ at about 3 weeks after maximum brightness. The nebular spectrum of SN 2002cx is also unique, consisting of narrow iron and cobalt lines. The observations of SN 2002cx are inconsistent with the observed spectral/photometric sequence, and provide a major challenge to our understanding of SNe Ia. No existing theoretical model can successfully explain all observed aspects of SN 2002cx.