• Information needs to be appropriately encoded to be reliably transmitted over physical media. Similarly, neurons have their own codes to convey information in the brain. Even though it is well-known that neurons exchange information using a pool of several protocols of spatio-temporal encodings, the suitability of each code and their performance as a function of network parameters and external stimuli is still one of the great mysteries in neuroscience. This paper sheds light on this by modeling small-size networks of chemically and electrically coupled Hindmarsh-Rose spiking neurons. We focus on a class of temporal and firing-rate codes that result from neurons' membrane-potentials and phases, and quantify numerically their performance estimating the Mutual Information Rate, aka the rate of information exchange. Our results suggest that the firing-rate and interspike-intervals codes are more robust to additive Gaussian white noise. In a network of four interconnected neurons and in the absence of such noise, pairs of neurons that have the largest rate of information exchange using the interspike-intervals and firing-rate codes are not adjacent in the network, whereas spike-timings and phase codes (temporal) promote large rate of information exchange for adjacent neurons. If that result would have been possible to extend to larger neural networks, it would suggest that small microcircuits would preferably exchange information using temporal codes (spike-timings and phase codes), whereas on the macroscopic scale, where there would be typically pairs of neurons not directly connected due to the brain's sparsity, firing-rate and interspike-intervals codes would be the most efficient codes.
  • We study opinion dynamics over multiplex networks where agents interact with bounded confidence. Namely, two neighbouring individuals exchange opinions and compromise if their opinions do not differ by more than a given threshold. In literature, agents are generally assumed to have a homogeneous confidence bound. Here, we study analytically and numerically opinion evolution over structured networks characterised by multiple layers with respective confidence thresholds and general initial opinion distributions. Through rigorous probability analysis, we show analytically the critical thresholds at which a phase transition takes place in the long-term consensus behaviour, over multiplex networks with some regularity conditions. Our results reveal the quantitative relation between the critical threshold and initial distribution. Further, our numerical simulations illustrate the consensus behaviour of the agents in network topologies including lattices and, small-world and scale-free networks, as well as for structure-dependent convergence parameters accommodating node heterogeneity. We find that the critical thresholds for consensus tend to agree with the predicted upper bounds in Theorems 4 and 5 in this paper. Finally, our results indicate that multiplexity hinders consensus formation when the initial opinion configuration is within a bounded range and, provide insight into information diffusion and social dynamics in multiplex systems modeled by networks.
  • In this paper we study data from financial markets using an information-theory tool that we call the normalised Mutual Information Rate and show how to use it to infer the underlying network structure of interrelations in foreign currency exchange rates and stock indices of 14 countries world-wide and the European Union. We first present the mathematical method and discuss about its computational aspects, and then apply it to artificial data from chaotic dynamics and to correlated random variates. Next, we apply the method to infer the network structure of the financial data. Particularly, we study and reveal the interrelations among the various foreign currency exchange rates and stock indices in two separate networks for which we also perform an analysis to identify their structural properties. Our results show that both are small-world networks sharing similar properties but also having distinct differences in terms of assortativity. Finally, the consistent relationships depicted among the 15 economies are further supported by a discussion from the economics view point.
  • In the study of subdiffusive wave-packet spreading in disordered Klein-Gordon (KG) nonlinear lattices, a central open question is whether the motion continues to be chaotic despite decreasing densities, or tends to become quasi-periodic as nonlinear terms become negligible. In a recent study of such KG particle chains with quartic (4th order) anharmonicity in the on-site potential, it was shown that $q-$Gaussian probability distribution functions of sums of position observables with $q > 1$ always approach pure Gaussians ($q=1$) in the long time limit and hence the motion of the full system is ultimately "strongly chaotic". In the present paper, we show that these results continue to hold even when a sextic (6th order) term is gradually added to the potential and ultimately prevails over the 4th order anharmonicity, despite expectations that the dynamics is more "regular", at least in the regime of small oscillations. Analyzing this system in the subdiffusive energy domain using $q$-statistics, we demonstrate that groups of oscillators centered around the initially excited one (as well as the full chain) possess strongly chaotic dynamics and are thus far from any quasi-periodic torus, for times as long as $t=10^9$.
  • In this paper, we explore the role of network topology on maintaining the extensive property of entropy. We study analytically and numerically how the topology contributes to maintaining extensivity of entropy in multiplex networks, i.e. networks of subnetworks (layers), by means of the sum of the positive Lyapunov exponents, $H_{KS}$, a quantity related to entropy. We show that extensivity relies not only on the interplay between the coupling strengths of the dynamics associated to the intra (short-range) and inter (long-range) interactions, but also on the sum of the intra-degrees of the nodes of the layers. For the analytically treated networks of size $N$, among several other results, we show that if the sum of the intra-degrees (and the sum of inter-degrees) scales as $N^{\theta+1},\;\theta>0$, extensivity can be maintained if the intra-coupling (and the inter-coupling) strength scales as $N^{-\theta}$, when evolution is driven by the maximisation of $H_{KS}$. We then verify our analytical results by performing numerical simulations in multiplex networks formed by electrically and chemically coupled neurons.
  • We study the capacity of Hodgkin-Huxley neuron in a network to change temporarily or permanently their connections and behavior, the so called spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), as a function of their synchronous behavior. We consider STDP of excitatory and inhibitory synapses driven by Hebbian rules. We show that the final state of networks evolved by a STDP depend on the initial network configuration. Specifically, an initial all-to-all topology envolves to a complex topology. Moreover, external perturbations can induce co-existence of clusters, those whose neurons are synchronous and those whose neurons are desynchronous. This work reveals that STDP based on Hebbian rules leads to a change in the direction of the synapses between high and low frequency neurons, and therefore, Hebbian learning can be explained in terms of preferential attachment between these two diverse communities of neurons, those with low-frequency spiking neurons, and those with higher-frequency spiking neurons.
  • We study external, electrical perturbations and their responses in the brain dynamic network of the \textit{Caenorhabditis elegans} soil worm, given by the connectome of its large somatic nervous system. Our analysis is inspired by a realistic experiment where one stimulates externally specific parts of the brain and studies the persistent neural activity triggered in other cortical regions. In this work, we perturb groups of neurons that form communities, identified by the walktrap community detection method, by trains of stereotypical electrical Poissonian impulses and study the propagation of neural activity to other communities by measuring the corresponding dynamic ranges and Steven law exponents. We show that when one perturbs specific communities, keeping the rest unperturbed, the external stimulations are able to propagate to some of them but not to all. There are also perturbations that do not trigger any response. We found that this depends on the initially perturbed community. Finally, we relate our findings for the former cases with low neural synchronization, self-criticality and large information flow capacity, and interpret them as the ability of the brain network to respond to external perturbations when it works at criticality and its information flow capacity becomes maximal.
  • Chimera states, namely the coexistence of coherent and incoherent behavior, were previously analyzed in complex networks. However, they have not been extensively studied in modular networks. Here, we consider the neural network of the \textit{C.elegans} soil worm, organized into six interconnected communities, where neurons obey chaotic bursting dynamics. Neurons are assumed to be connected with electrical synapses within their communities and with chemical synapses across them. As our numerical simulations reveal, the coaction of these two types of coupling can shape the dynamics in such a way that chimera-like states can happen. They consist of a fraction of synchronized neurons which belong to the larger communities, and a fraction of desynchronized neurons which are part of smaller communities. In addition to the Kuramoto order parameter $\rho$, we also employ other measures of coherence, such as the chimera-like $\chi$ and metastability $\lambda$ indices, which quantify the degree of synchronization among communities and along time, respectively. We perform the same analysis for networks that share common features with the \textit{C.elegans} neural network. Similar results suggest that under certain assumptions, chimera-like states are prominent phenomena in modular networks, and might provide insight for the behavior of more complex modular networks.
  • We model the neuronal circuit of the C.elegans soil worm in terms of Hindmarsh-Rose systems of ordinary differential equations, dividing its circuit into six communities pointed out by the walktrap and Louvain methods. Using the numerical solution of these equations, we analyze important measures of dynamical complexity, namely synchronicity, the largest Lyapunov exponent, and the $\Phi_{\mbox{AR}}$ auto-regressive integrated information theory measure, which has been suggested to reflect different levels of consciousness. We show that $\Phi_{\mbox{AR}}$ provides a useful measure of the information contained in the C.elegans brain dynamic network. Our analysis reveals that the C.elegans brain dynamic network generates more information than the sum of its constituent parts, and that attains higher levels of integrated information for couplings for which either all its communities are highly synchronized, or there is a mixed state of highly synchronized and desynchronized communities. Both situations are characterized by relatively low chaotic behavior.
  • We investigate dynamically and statistically diffusive motion in a chain of linearly coupled 2-dimensional symplectic McMillan maps and find evidence of subdiffusion in weakly and strongly chaotic regimes when all maps of the chain possess a saddle point at the origin and the central map is initially excited. In the case of weak coupling, there is either absence of diffusion or subdiffusion with $q>1$-Gaussian probability distributions, characterizing weak chaos. However, for large enough coupling and already moderate number of maps, the system exhibits strongly chaotic ($q\approx 1$) subdiffusive behavior, reminiscent of the subdiffusive energy spreading observed in a disordered Klein-Gordon Hamiltonian. Our results provide evidence that coupled symplectic maps can exhibit physical properties similar to those of disordered Hamiltonian systems, even though the local dynamics in the two cases is significantly different.
  • We propose a working hypothesis supported by numerical simulations that brain networks evolve based on the principle of the maximization of their internal information flow capacity. We find that synchronous behavior and capacity of information flow of the evolved networks reproduce well the same behaviors observed in the brain dynamical networks of Caenorhabditis elegans and humans, networks of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with graphs given by these brain networks. We make a strong case to verify our hypothesis by showing that the neural networks with the closest graph distance to the brain networks of Caenorhabditis elegans and humans are the Hindmarsh-Rose neural networks evolved with coupling strengths that maximize information flow capacity. Surprisingly, we find that global neural synchronization levels decrease during brain evolution, reflecting on an underlying global no Hebbian-like evolution process, which is driven by no Hebbian-like learning behaviors for some of the clusters during evolution, and Hebbian-like learning rules for clusters where neurons increase their synchronization.
  • We study the seismicity (global seismic activity) that occurred in Greece between 1976 and 2009 based on the dataset reported in Makropoulos et al., 2012, using concepts of Non-extensive Statistical Physics. By considering the entire and declustered datasets, for which the aftershocks have been removed, we initially investigate the frequency-magnitude distribution and find that both datasets are well approximated by a physical model derived in the framework of Non-extensive Statistical Physics. We then carry out a study of the distribution of interevent times of seismic events for different magnitude thresholds and discover that the data are well approximated by a statistical distribution of the $q$-exponential type that allows us to compute analytically the hazard function of earthquake production. Our analysis thus reveals further evidence that the underlying dynamical process of earthquake birth reflects a kind of nonlinear memory due to long-term persistence of seismic events.
  • We study numerically statistical distributions of sums of orbit coordinates, viewed as independent random variables in the spirit of the Central Limit Theorem, in weakly chaotic regimes associated with the excitation of the first ($k=1$) and last ($k=N$) linear normal modes of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-$\alpha$ system under fixed boundary conditions. We show that at low energies ($E=0.19$), when the $k=1$ linear mode is excited, chaotic diffusion occurs characterized by distributions that are well approximated for long times ($t>10^9$) by a $q$-Gaussian Quasi-Stationary State (QSS) with $q\approx1.4$. On the other hand, when the $k=N$ mode is excited at the same energy, diffusive phenomena are \textit{absent} and the motion is quasi-periodic. In fact, as the energy increases to $E=0.3$, the distributions in the former case pass through \textit{shorter} $q$-Gaussian states and tend rapidly to a Gaussian (i.e. $q\rightarrow 1$) where equipartition sets in, while in the latter we need to reach to E=4 to see a \textit{sudden transition} to Gaussian statistics, without any passage through an intermediate QSS. This may be explained by different energy localization properties and recurrence phenomena in the two cases, supporting the view that when the energy is placed in the first mode weak chaos and "sticky" dynamics lead to a more gradual process of energy sharing, while strong chaos and equipartition appear abruptly when only the last mode is initially excited.
  • We study numerically statistical distributions of sums of chaotic orbit coordinates, viewed as independent random variables, in weakly chaotic regimes of three multi-dimensional Hamiltonian systems: Two Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU-$\beta$) oscillator chains with different boundary conditions and numbers of particles and a microplasma of identical ions confined in a Penning trap and repelled by mutual Coulomb interactions. For the FPU systems we show that, when chaos is limited within "small size" phase space regions, statistical distributions of sums of chaotic variables are well approximated for surprisingly long times (typically up to $t\approx10^6$) by a $q$-Gaussian ($1<q<3$) distribution and tend to a Gaussian ($q=1$) for longer times, as the orbits eventually enter into "large size" chaotic domains. However, in agreement with other studies, we find in certain cases that the $q$-Gaussian is not the only possible distribution that can fit the data, as our sums may be better approximated by a different so-called "crossover" function attributed to finite-size effects. In the case of the microplasma Hamiltonian, we make use of these $q$-Gaussian distributions to identify two energy regimes of "weak chaos"-one where the system melts and one where it transforms from liquid to a gas state-by observing where the $q$-index of the distribution increases significantly above the $q=1$ value of strong chaos.