• A C*-algebra is determined to a great extent by the partial order of its commutative C*-algebras. We study order-theoretic properties of this dcpo. Many properties coincide: the dcpo is, equivalently, algebraic, continuous, meet-continuous, atomistic, quasi-algebraic, or quasi-continuous, if and only if the C*-algebra is scattered. For C*-algebras with enough projections, these properties are equivalent to finite-dimensionality. Approximately finite-dimensional elements of the dcpo correspond to Boolean subalgebras of the projections of the C*-algebra, which determine the projections up to isomorphism. Scattered C*-algebras are finite-dimensional if and only if their dcpo is Lawson-scattered. General C*-algebras are finite-dimensional if and only if their dcpo is order-scattered.
  • The structure of the category of matroids and strong maps is investigated: it has coproducts and equalizers, but not products or coequalizers; there are functors from the categories of graphs and vector spaces, the latter being faithful; there is a functor to the category of geometric lattices, that is nearly full; there are various adjunctions and free constructions on subcategories, inducing a simplification monad; there are two orthogonal factorization systems; some, but not many, combinatorial constructions from matroid theory are functorial.
  • On the functor l^2 (1012.4526)

    Sept. 18, 2018 quant-ph, math.CT, math.FA
    We study the functor l^2 from the category of partial injections to the category of Hilbert spaces. The former category is finitely accessible, and its homsets are algebraic domains; the latter category has conditionally algebraic domains for homsets. The functor preserves daggers, monoidal structures, enrichment, and various (co)limits, but has no adjoints. Up to unitaries, its direct image consists precisely of the partial isometries, but its essential image consists of all continuous linear maps between Hilbert spaces.
  • The CBH theorem characterises quantum theory within a C*-algebraic framework. Namely, mathematical properties of C*-algebras modelling quantum systems are equivalent to constraints that are information-theoretic in nature: (1) noncommutativity of subalgebras is equivalent to impossibility of signalling; (2) noncommutativity of the whole algebra is equivalent to impossibility of broadcasting; (3) the existence of entangled states is implied by the impossibility of secure bit commitment (with the converse conjectured). However, the C*-algebraic framework has drawn criticism as it already contains much of the mathematical structure of quantum theory such as complex linearity. We address this issue by a generalising C*-algebras categorically. In this framework, equivalence (1) holds, equivalence (2) becomes a strict implication, and implication (3) fails in general. Thus we identify exactly what work is being done by the complex-linear structure of C*-algebras. In doing so, we uncover a richer hierarchy of notions of 'classicality' and 'quantumness' of information than visible in the concrete case.
  • We study the monoidal dagger category of Hilbert C*-modules over a commutative C*-algebra from the perspective of categorical quantum mechanics. The dual objects are the finitely presented projective Hilbert C*-modules. Special dagger Frobenius structures correspond to bundles of uniformly finite-dimensional C*-algebras. A monoid is dagger Frobenius over the base if and only if it is dagger Frobenius over its centre and the centre is dagger Frobenius over the base. We characterise the commutative dagger Frobenius structures as finite coverings, and give nontrivial examples of both commutative and central dagger Frobenius structures. Subobjects of the tensor unit correspond to clopen subsets of the Gelfand spectrum of the C*-algebra, and we discuss dagger kernels.
  • We develop a direct method to recover an orthoalgebra from its poset of Boolean subalgebras. For this a new notion of direction is introduced. Directions are also used to characterize in purely order-theoretic terms those posets that are isomorphic to the poset of Boolean subalgebras of an orthoalgebra. These posets are characterized by simple conditions defining orthodomains and the additional requirement of having enough directions. Excepting pathologies involving maximal Boolean subalgebras of four elements, it is shown that there is an equivalence between the category of orthoalgebras and the category of orthodomains with enough directions with morphisms suitably defined. Furthermore, we develop a representation of orthodomains with enough directions, and hence of orthoalgebras, as certain hypergraphs. This hypergraph approach extends the technique of Greechie diagrams and resembles projective geometry. Using such hypergraphs, every orthomodular poset can be represented by a set of points and lines where each line contains exactly three points.
  • We develop a notion of limit for dagger categories, that we show is suitable in the following ways: it subsumes special cases known from the literature; dagger limits are unique up to unitary isomorphism; a wide class of dagger limits can be built from a small selection of them; dagger limits of a fixed shape can be phrased as dagger adjoints to a diagonal functor; dagger limits can be built from ordinary limits in the presence of polar decomposition; dagger limits commute with dagger colimits in many cases.
  • The category of Hilbert modules may be interpreted as a naive quantum field theory over a base space. Open subsets of the base space are recovered as idempotent subunits, which form a meet-semilattice in any firm braided monoidal category. There is an operation of restriction to an idempotent subunit: it is a graded monad on the category, and has the universal property of algebraic localisation. Spacetime structure on the base space induces a closure operator on the idempotent subunits. Restriction is then interpreted as spacetime propagation. This lets us study relativistic quantum information theory using methods entirely internal to monoidal categories. As a proof of concept, we show that quantum teleportation is only successfully supported on the intersection of Alice and Bob's causal future.
  • Standard quantum theory represents a composite system at a given time by a joint state, but it does not prescribe a joint state for a composite of systems at different times. If a more even-handed treatment of space and time is possible, then such a joint state should be definable, and one might expect it to satisfy the following five conditions: that it is a Hermitian operator on the tensor product of the single-time Hilbert spaces; that it represents probabilistic mixing appropriately; that it has the appropriate classical limit; that it has the appropriate single-time marginals; that composing over multiple time-steps is associative. We show that no construction satisfies all these requirements. If an even-handed treatment of space and time is possible, therefore, one or more axioms must be dropped. In particular, if Hermiticity is dropped, then we show that the construction is fixed uniquely up to an ordering convention.
  • Higher-order probabilistic programming languages allow programmers to write sophisticated models in machine learning and statistics in a succinct and structured way, but step outside the standard measure-theoretic formalization of probability theory. Programs may use both higher-order functions and continuous distributions, or even define a probability distribution on functions. But standard probability theory does not handle higher-order functions well: the category of measurable spaces is not cartesian closed. Here we introduce quasi-Borel spaces. We show that these spaces: form a new formalization of probability theory replacing measurable spaces; form a cartesian closed category and so support higher-order functions; form a well-pointed category and so support good proof principles for equational reasoning; and support continuous probability distributions. We demonstrate the use of quasi-Borel spaces for higher-order functions and probability by: showing that a well-known construction of probability theory involving random functions gains a cleaner expression; and generalizing de Finetti's theorem, that is a crucial theorem in probability theory, to quasi-Borel spaces.
  • Interpretational problems with quantum mechanics can be phrased precisely by only talking about empirically accessible information. This prompts a mathematical reformulation of quantum mechanics in terms of classical mechanics. We survey this programme in terms of algebraic quantum theory.
  • We investigate how a C*-algebra could consist of functions on a noncommutative set: a discretization of a C*-algebra $A$ is a $*$-homomorphism $A \to M$ that factors through the canonical inclusion $C(X) \subseteq \ell^\infty(X)$ when restricted to a commutative C*-subalgebra. Any C*-algebra admits an injective but nonfunctorial discretization, as well as a possibly noninjective functorial discretization, where $M$ is a C*-algebra. Any subhomogenous C*-algebra admits an injective functorial discretization, where $M$ is a W*-algebra. However, any functorial discretization, where $M$ is an AW*-algebra, must trivialize $A = B(H)$ for any infinite-dimensional Hilbert space $H$.
  • The theory of monads on categories equipped with a dagger (a contravariant identity-on-objects involutive endofunctor) works best when everything respects the dagger: the monad and adjunctions should preserve the dagger, and the monad and its algebras should satisfy the so-called Frobenius law. Then any monad resolves as an adjunction, with extremal solutions given by the categories of Kleisli and Frobenius-Eilenberg-Moore algebras, which again have a dagger. We characterize the Frobenius law as a coherence property between dagger and closure, and characterize strong such monads as being induced by Frobenius monoids.
  • The C*-algebra of bounded operators on the separable infinite-dimensional Hilbert space cannot be mapped to a W*-algebra in such a way that each unital commutative C*-subalgebra C(X) factors normally through $\ell^\infty(X)$. Consequently, there is no faithful functor discretizing C*-algebras to AW*-algebras, including von Neumann algebras, in this way.
  • We study the semantic foundation of expressive probabilistic programming languages, that support higher-order functions, continuous distributions, and soft constraints (such as Anglican, Church, and Venture). We define a metalanguage (an idealised version of Anglican) for probabilistic computation with the above features, develop both operational and denotational semantics, and prove soundness, adequacy, and termination. They involve measure theory, stochastic labelled transition systems, and functor categories, but admit intuitive computational readings, one of which views sampled random variables as dynamically allocated read-only variables. We apply our semantics to validate nontrivial equations underlying the correctness of certain compiler optimisations and inference algorithms such as sequential Monte Carlo simulation. The language enables defining probability distributions on higher-order functions, and we study their properties.
  • Compact categories have lately seen renewed interest via applications to quantum physics. Being essentially finite-dimensional, they cannot accomodate (co)limit-based constructions. For example, they cannot capture protocols such as quantum key distribution, that rely on the law of large numbers. To overcome this limitation, we introduce the notion of a compactly accessible category, relying on the extra structure of a factorisation system. This notion allows for infinite dimension while retaining key properties of compact categories: the main technical result is that the choice-of-duals functor on the compact part extends canonically to the whole compactly accessible category. As an example, we model a quantum key distribution protocol and prove its correctness categorically.
  • We relate notions of complementarity in three layers of quantum mechanics: (i) von Neumann algebras, (ii) Hilbert spaces, and (iii) orthomodular lattices. Taking a more general categorical perspective of which the above are instances, we consider dagger monoidal kernel categories for (ii), so that (i) become (sub)endohomsets and (iii) become subobject lattices. By developing a `point-free' definition of copyability we link (i) commutative von Neumann subalgebras, (ii) classical structures, and (iii) Boolean subalgebras.
  • Categories of relations over a regular category form a family of models of quantum theory. Using regular logic, many properties of relations over sets lift to these models, including the correspondence between Frobenius structures and internal groupoids. Over compact Hausdorff spaces, this lifting gives continuous symmetric encryption. Over a regular Mal'cev category, this correspondence gives a characterization of categories of completely positive maps, enabling the formulation of quantum features. These models are closer to Hilbert spaces than relations over sets in several respects: Heisenberg uncertainty, impossibility of broadcasting, and behavedness of rank one morphisms.
  • In many a traditional physics textbook, a quantum measurement is defined as a projective measurement represented by a Hermitian operator. In quantum information theory, however, the concept of a measurement is dealt with in complete generality and we are therefore forced to confront the more general notion of positive-operator valued measures (POVMs) which suffice to describe all measurements that can be implemented in quantum experiments. We study the (in)compatibility of such POVMs and show that quantum theory realizes all possible (in)compatibility relations among sets of POVMs. This is in contrast to the restricted case of projective measurements for which commutativity is essentially equivalent to compatibility. Our result therefore points out a fundamental feature with respect to the (in)compatibility of quantum observables that has no analog in the case of projective measurements.
  • This volume contains the proceedings of the 12th International Workshop on Quantum Physics and Logic (QPL 2015), which was held July 15-17, 2015 at Oxford University. The goal of this workshop series is to bring together researchers working on mathematical foundations of quantum physics, quantum computing, spatio-temporal causal structures, and related areas such as computational linguistics. Of particular interest are topics that use logical tools, ordered algebraic and category-theoretic structures, formal languages, semantical methods and other computer science methods for the study of physical behaviour in general.
  • Two fundamental contributions to categorical quantum mechanics are presented. First, we generalize the CP-construction, that turns any dagger compact category into one with completely positive maps, to arbitrary dimension. Second, we axiomatize when a given category is the result of this construction.
  • We extend categorical semantics of monadic programming to reversible computing, by considering monoidal closed dagger categories: the dagger gives reversibility, whereas closure gives higher-order expressivity. We demonstrate that Frobenius monads model the appropriate notion of coherence between the dagger and closure by reinforcing Cayley's theorem; by proving that effectful computations (Kleisli morphisms) are reversible precisely when the monad is Frobenius; by characterizing the largest reversible subcategory of Eilenberg-Moore algebras; and by identifying the latter algebras as measurements in our leading example of quantum computing. Strong Frobenius monads are characterized internally by Frobenius monoids.
  • There are two ways to describe the interaction between classical and quantum information categorically: one based on completely positive maps between Frobenius algebras, the other using symmetric monoidal 2-categories. This paper makes a first step towards combining the two. The integrated approach allows a unified description of quantum teleportation and classical encryption in a single 2-category, as well as a universal security proof applicable simultaneously to both scenarios.
  • The recently introduced CP*-construction unites quantum channels and classical systems, subsuming the earlier CPM-construction in categorical quantum mechanics. We compare this construction to two earlier attempts at solving this problem: freely adding biproducts to CPM, and freely splitting idempotents in CPM. The CP*-construction embeds the former, and embeds into the latter, but neither embedding is an equivalence in general.
  • We introduce a construction that turns a category of pure state spaces and operators into a category of observable algebras and superoperators. For example, it turns the category of finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces into the category of finite-dimensional C*-algebras and completely positive maps. In particular, the new category contains both quantum and classical channels, providing elegant abstract notions of preparation and measurement. We also consider nonstandard models, that can be used to investigate which notions from algebraic quantum information theory are operationally justifiable.