• Swirling motions in the solar atmosphere have been widely observed in recent years and suggested to play a key role in channeling energy from the photosphere into the corona. Here, we present a newly-developed Automated Swirl Detection Algorithm (ASDA) and discuss its applications. ASDA is found to be very proficient at detecting swirls in a variety of synthetic data with various levels of noise, implying our subsequent scientific results are astute. Applying ASDA to photospheric observations with a spatial resolution of 39.2 km sampled by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on-board Hinode, suggests a total number of $1.62\times10^5$ swirls in the photosphere, with an average radius and rotating speed of $\sim290$ km and $< 1.0$ km s$^{-1}$, respectively. Comparisons between swirls detected in Bifrost numerical MHD simulations and both ground-based and space-borne observations, suggest that: 1) the spatial resolution of data plays a vital role in the total number and radii of swirls detected; and 2) noise introduced by seeing effects could decrease the detection rate of swirls, but has no significant influences in determining their inferred properties. All results have shown that there is no significant difference in the analysed properties between counter-clockwise or clockwise rotating swirls. About 70% of swirls are located in intergranular lanes. Most of the swirls have lifetimes less than twice of the cadences, meaning future research should aim to use data with much higher cadences than 6 s. In the conclusions, we propose some promising future research applications where ASDA may provide useful insights.
  • We report on high-resolution imaging and spectral observations of eruptions of a spiral structure in the transition region, which were taken with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS), the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The eruption coincided with the appearance of two series of jets, with velocities comparable to the Alfv\'en speeds in their footpoints. Several pieces of evidence of magnetic braiding in the eruption are revealed, including localized bright knots, multiple well-separated jet threads, transition region explosive events and the fact that all these three are falling into the same locations within the eruptive structures. Through analysis of the extrapolated three-dimensional magnetic field in the region, we found that the eruptive spiral structure corresponded well to locations of twisted magnetic flux tubes with varying curl values along their lengths. The eruption occurred where strong parallel currents, high squashing factors, and large twist numbers were obtained. The electron number density of the eruptive structure is found to be $\sim3\times10^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$, indicating that significant amount of mass could be pumped into the corona by the jets. Following the eruption, the extrapolations revealed a set of seemingly relaxed loops, which were visible in the AIA 94 \AA\ channel indicating temperatures of around 6.3 MK. With these observations, we suggest that magnetic braiding could be part of the mechanisms explaining the formation of solar eruption and the mass and energy supplement to the corona.