• We present a fully consistent catalog of local and global properties of host galaxies of 882 Type Ia supernov\ae\ (SNIa) that were selected based on their light-curve properties, spanning the redshift range $0.01 < z < 1.\text{}$ This catalog corresponds to a preliminary version of the compilation sample and includes Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) 5-year data, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and low-redshift surveys. We measured low- and moderate-redshift host galaxy photometry in SNLS and SDSS images and used spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting techniques to derive host properties such as stellar mass and $U-V$ rest-frame colors; the latter are an indicator of the luminosity-weighted age of the stellar population in a galaxy. We also estimated the local observed fluxes at the supernova location within a proper distance radius of 3 kpc, and transposed them into local $U-V$ rest-frame colors. Selecting SNIa based on host photometry quality, we then performed cosmological fits using local color as a third standardization variable, for which we split the sample at the median value. We find a local color step as significant as the maximum mass step effect. Correcting for the maximum mass step correction, we still find a significant local color effect, which shows that additional information is provided by the close environment of SNIa. Departures from the initial choices were investigated, and we discuss the possible implications for cosmology. This will be of tremendous importance for the forthcoming SNIa surveys, and in particular for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), for which uncertainties on the dark energy equation of state will be comparable to the effects reported here.
  • We present observations of four rapidly rising (t_{rise}~10d) transients with peak luminosities between those of supernovae (SNe) and superluminous SNe (M_{peak}~-20) - one discovered and followed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three by the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). The light curves resemble those of SN 2011kl, recently shown to be associated with an ultra-long-duration gamma ray burst (GRB), though no GRB was seen to accompany our SNe. The rapid rise to a luminous peak places these events in a unique part of SN phase space, challenging standard SN emission mechanisms. Spectra of the PTF event formally classify it as a Type II SN due to broad Halpha emission, but an unusual absorption feature, which can be interpreted as either high velocity Halpha (though deeper than in previously known cases) or Si II (as seen in Type Ia SNe), is also observed. We find that existing models of white dwarf detonations, CSM interaction, shock breakout in a wind (or steeper CSM) and magnetar spindown can not readily explain the observations. We consider the possibility that a "Type 1.5 SN" scenario could be the origin of our events. More detailed models for these kinds of transients and more constraining observations of future such events should help better determine their nature.
  • We present deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging at the locations of four, potentially hostless, long-faded Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in low-redshift, rich galaxy clusters that were identified in the Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster Survey. Assuming a steep faint-end slope for the galaxy cluster luminosity function ($\alpha_d=-1.5$), our data includes all but $\lesssim0.2\%$ percent of the stellar mass in cluster galaxies ($\lesssim0.005\%$ with $\alpha_d=-1.0$), a factor of 10 better than our ground-based imaging. Two of the four SNe Ia still have no possible host galaxy associated with them ($M_R>-9.2$), confirming that their progenitors belong to the intracluster stellar population. The third SNe Ia appears near a faint disk galaxy ($M_V=-12.2$) which has a relatively high probability of being a chance alignment. A faint, red, point source coincident with the fourth SN Ia's explosion position ($M_V=-8.4$) may be either a globular cluster (GC) or faint dwarf galaxy. We estimate the local surface densities of GCs and dwarfs to show that a GC is more likely, due to the proximity of an elliptical galaxy, but neither can be ruled out. This faint host implies that the SN Ia rate in dwarfs or GCs may be enhanced, but remains within previous observational constraints. We demonstrate that our results do not preclude the use of SNe Ia as bright tracers of intracluster light at higher redshifts, but that it will be necessary to first refine the constraints on their rate in dwarfs and GCs with deep imaging for a larger sample of low-redshift, apparently hostless SNe Ia.