• Weyl semimetals are characterized by Fermi arc surface states. As a function of surface momentum, such arcs constitute energy-degenerate line trajectories terminating at the surface projection of two bulk Weyl nodes with opposite chirality. At these projection points, the Fermi arc transcends into a bulk state, and as such yields an intricate connectivity of surface-localized and bulk-delocalized states. Spectroscopic approaches face the challenge to efficiently image this surface-bulk transition of the Fermi arcs for topological semimetals in general. Here, employing a joint analysis from orbital-selective angle-resolved photoemission and first-principles calculations, we unveil the orbital texture on the full Fermi surface of TaP. We put forward a diagnosis scheme to formulate and measure the orbital fingerprint of topological Fermi arcs and their surface-bulk transition in a Weyl semimetal.
  • In two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), new electronic phenomena such as tunable band gaps and strongly bound excitons and trions emerge from strong many-body effects, beyond spin-orbit coupling- and lattice symmetry-induced spin and valley degrees of freedom. Combining single-layer (SL) TMDs with other 2D materials in van der Waals heterostructures offers an intriguing means of controlling the electronic properties through these many-body effects via engineered interlayer interactions. Here, we employ micro-focused angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (microARPES) and in-situ surface doping to manipulate the electronic structure of SL WS$_2$ on hexagonal boron nitride (WS$_2$/h-BN). Upon electron doping, we observe an unexpected giant renormalization of the SL WS$_2$ valence band (VB) spin-orbit splitting from 430~meV to 660~meV, together with a band gap reduction of at least 325~meV, attributed to the formation of trionic quasiparticles. These findings suggest that the electronic, spintronic and excitonic properties are widely tunable in 2D TMD/h-BN heterostructures, as these are intimately linked to the quasiparticle dynamics of the materials.
  • The implementation of graphene in semiconducting technology requires the precise knowledge about the graphene-semiconductor interface. In our work the structure and electronic properties of the graphene/$n$-Ge(110) interface are investigated on the local (nm) and macro (from $\mu\mathrm{m}$ to mm) scales via a combination of different microscopic and spectroscopic surface science techniques accompanied by density functional theory calculations. The electronic structure of freestanding graphene remains almost completely intact in this system, with only a moderate $n$-doping indicating weak interaction between graphene and the Ge substrate. With regard to the optimization of graphene growth it is found that the substrate temperature is a crucial factor, which determines the graphene layer alignment on the Ge(110) substrate during its growth from the atomic carbon source. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the preparation routine for graphene on the doped semiconducting material ($n$-Ge) leads to the effective segregation of dopants at the interface between graphene and Ge(110). Furthermore, it is shown that these dopant atoms might form regular structures at the graphene/Ge interface and induce the doping of graphene. Our findings help to understand the interface properties of the graphene-semiconductor interfaces and the effect of dopants on the electronic structure of graphene in such systems.
  • The kagome lattice is a two-dimensional network of corner-sharing triangles known as a platform for exotic quantum magnetic states. Theoretical work has predicted that the kagome lattice may also host Dirac electronic states that could lead to topological and Chern insulating phases, but these have evaded experimental detection to date. Here we study the d-electron kagome metal Fe$_3$Sn$_2$ designed to support bulk massive Dirac fermions in the presence of ferromagnetic order. We observe a temperature independent intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity persisting above room temperature suggestive of prominent Berry curvature from the time-reversal breaking electronic bands of the kagome plane. Using angle-resolved photoemission, we discover a pair of quasi-2D Dirac cones near the Fermi level with a 30 meV mass gap that accounts for the Berry curvature-induced Hall conductivity. We show this behavior is a consequence of the underlying symmetry properties of the bilayer kagome lattice in the ferromagnetic state with atomic spin-orbit coupling. This report provides the first evidence for a ferromagnetic kagome metal and an example of emergent topological electronic properties in a correlated electron system. This offers insight into recent discoveries of exotic electronic behavior in kagome lattice antiferromagnets and may provide a stepping stone toward lattice model realizations of fractional topological quantum states.
  • There is a substantial interest in the heterostructures of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) amongst each other or with arbitrary materials, through which the control of the chemical, structural, electronic, spintronic, and optical properties can lead to a change in device paradigms. A critical need is to understand the interface between TMDCs and insulating substrates, for example high-$\kappa$ dielectrics, which can strongly impact the electronic properties such as the optical gap. Here we show that the chemical and electronic properties of the single-layer (SL) TMDC, WS$_2$, can be transferred onto high-$\kappa$ transition metal oxide substrates TiO$_2$ and SrTiO$_3$. The resulting samples are much more suitable for measuring their electronic and chemical structures with angle-resolved photoemission than their native-grown SiO$_2$ substrates. We probe the WS$_2$ on the micron scale across 100-micron flakes, and find that the occupied electronic structure is exactly as predicted for freestanding SL WS$_2$ with a strong spin-orbit splitting of 420~meV and a direct band gap at the valence band maximum. Our results suggest that TMDCs can be combined with arbitrary multi-functional oxides, which may introduce alternative means of controlling the optoelectronic properties of such materials.
  • Topological insulators host spin-polarized surface states born out of the energetic inversion of bulk bands driven by the spin-orbit interaction. Here we discover previously unidentified consequences of band-inversion on the surface electronic structure of the topological insulator Bi$_2$Se$_3$. By performing simultaneous spin, time, and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we map the spin-polarized unoccupied electronic structure and identify a surface resonance which is distinct from the topological surface state, yet shares a similar spin- orbital texture with opposite orientation. Its momentum- dependence and spin texture imply an intimate connection with the topological surface state. Calculations show these two distinct states can emerge from trivial Rashba-like states that change topology through the spin-orbit-induced band inversion. This work thus provides a compelling view of the coevolution of surface states through a topological phase transition, enabled by the unique capability of directly measuring the spin-polarized unoccupied band structure.
  • We use time- and angle-resolved photoemission to measure quasiparticle relaxation dynamics across a laser-induced superconducting phase transition in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta. Whereas low-fluence measurements reveal picosecond dynamics, sharp femtosecond dynamics emerge at higher fluence. Analyses of data as a function of energy, momentum, and doping indicate that the closure of the near-nodal gap and disruption of macroscopic coherence are primary mechanisms driving this onset. The results demonstrate the important influence of transient electronic structure on relaxation dynamics, which is relevant for developing an understanding of nonequilibrium phase transitions.
  • We use time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to characterize the dynamics of the energy gap in superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta (Bi2212). Photoexcitation drives the system into a nonequilibrium pseudogap state: Near the Brillouin zone diagonal (inside the normal-state Fermi arc), the gap completely closes for a pump fluence beyond F = 15 {\mu}J/cm^2; toward the Brillouin zone face (outside the Fermi arc), it remains open to at least 24 {\mu}J/cm^2. This strongly anisotropic gap response may indicate multiple competing ordering tendencies in Bi2212. Despite these contrasts, the gap recovers with relatively momentum-independent dynamics at all probed momenta, which shows the persistent influence of superconductivity both inside and outside the Fermi arc.
  • We use time- and angle-resolved photoemission to measure the nodal non-equilibrium electronic states in various dopings of Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$. We find that the initial pump-induced transient signal of these ungapped states is strongly affected by the onset of the superconducting gap at $T_c$, superconducting pairing fluctuations at $T_p$, and the pseudogap at $T^*$. Moreover, $T_p$ marks a suggestive threshold in the fluence-dependent transient signal, with the appearance of a critical fluence below $T_p$ that corresponds to the energy required to break apart all Cooper pairs. These results challenge the notion of a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in cuprate superconductors by establishing a new link between nodal quasiparticles and the cuprate phase diagram.
  • Recently discovered materials called three-dimensional topological insulators constitute examples of symmetry protected topological states in the absence of applied magnetic fields and cryogenic temperatures. A hallmark characteristic of these non-magnetic bulk insulators is the protected metallic electronic states confined to the material's surfaces. Electrons in these surface states are spin polarized with their spins governed by their direction of travel (linear momentum), resulting in a helical spin texture in momentum space. Spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) has been the only tool capable of directly observing this central feature with simultaneous energy, momentum, and spin sensitivity. By using an innovative photoelectron spectrometer with a high-flux laser-based light source, we discovered another surprising property of these surface electrons which behave like Dirac fermions. We found that the spin polarization of the resulting photoelectrons can be fully manipulated in all three dimensions through selection of the light polarization. These surprising effects are due to the spin-dependent interaction of the helical Dirac fermions with light, which originates from the strong spin-orbit coupling in the material. Our results illustrate unusual scenarios in which the spin polarization of photoelectrons is completely different from the spin state of electrons in the originating initial states. The results also provide the basis for a novel source of highly spin-polarized electrons with tunable polarization in three dimensions.
  • High resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) was performed on the three-dimensional topological insulator Bi$_2$Se$_3$ using a recently developed high-efficiency spectrometer. The topological surface state's helical spin structure is observed, in agreement with theoretical prediction. Spin textures of both chiralities, at energies above and below the Dirac point, are observed, and the spin structure is found to persist at room temperature. The measurements reveal additional unexpected spin polarization effects, which also originate from the spin-orbit interaction, but are well differentiated from topological physics by contrasting momentum and photon energy and polarization dependencies. These observations demonstrate significant deviations of photoelectron and quasiparticle spin polarizations. Our findings illustrate the inherent complexity of spin-resolved ARPES and demonstrate key considerations for interpreting experimental results.