• In this paper, we report new limits on 21cm emission from cosmic reionization based on a 135-day observing campaign with a 64-element deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. This work extends the work presented in Parsons et al. (2014) with more collecting area, a longer observing period, improved redundancy-based calibration, optimal fringe-rate filtering, and improved power-spectral analysis using optimal quadratic estimators. The result is a new $2\sigma$ upper limit on $\Delta^{2}(k)$ of (22.4 mK)$^2$ in the range $0.15 < k < 0.5h\ {\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ at $z = 8.4$. This represents a three-fold improvement over the previous best upper limit. As we discuss in more depth in a forthcoming paper (Pober et al. 2015, in prep), this upper limit supports and extends previous evidence against extremely cold reionization scenarios. We conclude with a discussion of implications for future 21cm reionization experiments, including the newly funded Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA). $\textbf{The limits presented in this paper have been retracted: The erratum can be found in Appendix A.}$
  • Foreground power dominates the measurements of interferometers that seek a statistical detection of highly-redshifted HI emission from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). The inherent spectral smoothness of synchrotron radiation, the dominant foreground emission mechanism, and the chromaticity of the instrument allows these experiments to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth and structured emission in Fourier space (the "wedge" or "pitchfork", and the "EoR Window", respectively). Faraday rotation can inject spectral structure into otherwise smooth polarized foreground emission, which through instrument effects or miscalibration could possibly pollute the EoR Window. Using data from the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) 19-element commissioning array, we investigate the polarization response of this new instrument in the power spectrum domain. We confirm the expected structure of foreground emission in Fourier space predicted by Thyagarajan et al. (2015a, 2016) for a HERA-type dish, and detect polarized power within the pitchfork. Using simulations of the polarized response of HERA feeds, we find that almost all of the power in Stokes Q, U and V can be attributed to instrumental leakage effects. Power consistent with noise in the EoR window suggests a negligible amount of spectrally-structured polarized power, to the noise-levels attained. This lends confidence to deep integrations with HERA in the future, but with a lower noise floor these future studies will also have to investigate their polarized response.
  • We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the dust continuum and [C II] 158 $\mu$m fine structure line emission towards a far-infrared-luminous quasar, ULAS J131911.29$+$095051.4 at $z=6.13$, and combine the new Cycle 1 data with ALMA Cycle 0 data. The combined data have an angular resolution $\sim$ $0.3$, and resolve both the dust continuum and the [C II] line emission on few kpc scales. The [C II] line emission is more irregular than the dust continuum emission which suggests different distributions between the dust and [C II]-emitting gas. The combined data confirm the [C II] velocity gradient that we previously detected in lower resolution ALMA image from Cycle 0 data alone. We apply a tilted ring model to the [C II] velocity map to obtain a rotation curve, and constrain the circular velocity to be 427 $\pm$ 55 km s$^{-1}$ at a radius of 3.2 kpc with an inclination angle of 34$^\circ$. We measure the dynamical mass within the 3.2 kpc region to be 13.4$_{-5.3}^{+7.8}$ $\times 10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$. This yields a black hole and host galaxy mass ratio of 0.020$_{-0.007}^{+0.013}$, which is about 4$_{-2}^{+3}$ times higher than the present-day $M_{\rm BH}$/$M_{\rm bulge}$ ratio. This suggests that the supermassive black hole grows the bulk of its mass before the formation of the most of stellar mass in this quasar host galaxy in the early universe.
  • The experimental efforts to detect the redshifted 21 cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) are limited predominantly by the chromatic instrumental systematic effect. The delay spectrum methodology for 21 cm power spectrum measurements brought new attention to the critical impact of an antenna's chromaticity on the viability of making this measurement. This methodology established a straightforward relationship between time-domain response of an instrument and the power spectrum modes accessible to a 21 cm EoR experiment. We examine the performance of a prototype of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) array element that is currently observing in Karoo desert, South Africa. We present a mathematical framework to derive the beam integrated frequency response of a HERA prototype element in reception from the return loss measurements between 100-200 MHz and determined the extent of additional foreground contamination in the delay space. The measurement reveals excess spectral structures in comparison to the simulation studies of the HERA element. Combined with the HERA data analysis pipeline that incorporates inverse covariance weighting in optimal quadratic estimation of power spectrum, we find that in spite of its departure from the simulated response, HERA prototype element satisfies the necessary criteria posed by the foreground attenuation limits and potentially can measure the power spectrum at spatial modes as low as $k_{\parallel} > 0.1h$~Mpc$^{-1}$. The work highlights a straightforward method for directly measuring an instrument response and assessing its impact on 21 cm EoR power spectrum measurements for future experiments that will use reflector-type antenna.
  • We report Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission of the {\it z=6.326} quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter J0100+2802). J0100+2802 is, by far the most optically luminous, and radio-quiet quasar with the most massive black hole known at z>6. The VLBA observations have a synthesized beam size of 12.10 mas $\times$5.36 mas (FWHM), and detected the radio continuum emission from this object with a peak surface brightness of 64.6+/-9.0 micro-Jy/beam and a total flux density of 88+/-19 micro-Jy. The position of the radio peak is consistent with that from SDSS in the optical and Chandra in the X-ray. The radio source is marginally resolved by the VLBA observations. A 2-D Gaussian fit to the image constrains the source size to $\rm (7.1+/-3.5) mas x (3.1+/-1.7) mas. This corresponds to a physical scale of (40+/-20) pc x (18+/-10) pc. We estimate the intrinsic brightness temperature of the VLBA source to be T_{B}=(1.6 +/- 1.2) x 10^{7} K. This is significantly higher than the maximum value in normal star forming galaxies, indicating an AGN origin for the radio continuum emission. However, it is also significantly lower than the brightness temperatures found in highest redshift radio-loud quasars. J0100+2802 provides a unique example to study the radio activity in optically luminous and radio quiet active galactic nuclei in the early universe. Further observations at multiple radio frequencies will accurately measure the spectral index and address the dominant radiation mechanism of the radio emission.
  • We report new IRAM/PdBI, JCMT/SCUBA-2, and VLA observations of the ultraluminous quasar SDSSJ010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter, J0100+2802) at z=6.3, which hosts the most massive supermassive black hole (SMBH) of 1.24x10^10 Msun known at z>6. We detect the [C II] 158 $\mu$m fine structure line and molecular CO(6-5) line and continuum emission at 353 GHz, 260 GHz, and 3 GHz from this quasar. The CO(2-1) line and the underlying continuum at 32 GHz are also marginally detected. The [C II] and CO detections suggest active star formation and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxy. The redshift determined with the [C II] and CO lines shows a velocity offset of ~1000 km/s from that measured with the quasar Mg II line. The CO (2-1) line luminosity provides direct constraint on the molecular gas mass which is about (1.0+/-0.3)x10^10 Msun. We estimate the FIR luminosity to be (3.5+/-0.7)x10^12 Lsun, and the UV-to-FIR spectral energy distribution of J0100+2802 is consistent with the templates of the local optically luminous quasars. The derived [C II]-to-FIR luminosity ratio of J0100+2802 is 0.0010+/-0.0002, which is slightly higher than the values of the most FIR luminous quasars at z~6. We investigate the constraint on the host galaxy dynamical mass of J0100+2802 based on the [C II] line spectrum. It is likely that this ultraluminous quasar lies above the local SMBH-galaxy mass relationship, unless we are viewing the system at a small inclination angle.
  • The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a staged experiment to measure 21 cm emission from the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM) throughout cosmic reionization ($z=6-12$), and to explore earlier epochs of our Cosmic Dawn ($z\sim30$). During these epochs, early stars and black holes heated and ionized the IGM, introducing fluctuations in 21 cm emission. HERA is designed to characterize the evolution of the 21 cm power spectrum to constrain the timing and morphology of reionization, the properties of the first galaxies, the evolution of large-scale structure, and the early sources of heating. The full HERA instrument will be a 350-element interferometer in South Africa consisting of 14-m parabolic dishes observing from 50 to 250 MHz. Currently, 19 dishes have been deployed on site and the next 18 are under construction. HERA has been designated as an SKA Precursor instrument. In this paper, we summarize HERA's scientific context and provide forecasts for its key science results. After reviewing the current state of the art in foreground mitigation, we use the delay-spectrum technique to motivate high-level performance requirements for the HERA instrument. Next, we present the HERA instrument design, along with the subsystem specifications that ensure that HERA meets its performance requirements. Finally, we summarize the schedule and status of the project. We conclude by suggesting that, given the realities of foreground contamination, current-generation 21 cm instruments are approaching their sensitivity limits. HERA is designed to bring both the sensitivity and the precision to deliver its primary science on the basis of proven foreground filtering techniques, while developing new subtraction techniques to unlock new capabilities. The result will be a major step toward realizing the widely recognized scientific potential of 21 cm cosmology.
  • We construct foreground simulations comprising spatially correlated extragalactic and diffuse Galactic emission components and calculate the `intrinsic' (instrument-free) two-dimensional spatial power spectrum and the cylindrically and spherically averaged three-dimensional k-space power spectra of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and our foreground simulations using a Bayesian power spectral estimation framework. This leads us to identify a model dependent region of optimal signal estimation for our foreground and EoR models, within which the spatial power in the EoR signal relative to foregrounds is maximised. We identify a target field dependent region, in k-space, of intrinsic foreground power spectral contamination at low k_perp and k_parallel and a transition to a relatively foreground-free intrinsic EoR window in the complement to this region. The contaminated region of k-space demonstrates that simultaneous estimation of the EoR and foregrounds is important for obtaining statistically robust estimates of the EoR power spectrum; biased results will be obtained from methodologies that ignore their covariance. Using simulated observations with frequency dependent uv-coverage and primary beam, with the former derived for HERA in 37-antenna and 331-antenna configuration, we recover instrumental power spectra consistent with their intrinsic counterparts. We discuss the implications of these results for optimal strategies for unbiased estimation of the EoR power spectrum.
  • We present CO(1-0) observations obtained at the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) for 14 z~2 galaxies with existing CO(3-2) measurements, including 11 galaxies which contain active galactic nuclei (AGN) and three submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). We combine this sample with an additional 15 z~2 galaxies from the literature that have both CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) measurements in order to evaluate differences in CO excitation between SMGs and AGN host galaxies, measure the effects of CO excitation on the derived molecular gas properties of these populations, and to look for correlations between the molecular gas excitation and other physical parameters. With our expanded sample of CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) line ratio measurements, we do not find a statistically significant difference in the mean line ratio between SMGs and AGN host galaxies as found in the literature, instead finding r_3,1=1.03+/-0.50 for AGN host galaxies and r_3,1=0.78+/-0.27 for SMGs (or r_3,1=0.90+/-0.40 for both populations combined). We also do not measure a statistically significant difference between the distributions of the line ratios for these populations at the p=0.05 level, although this result is less robust. We find no excitation dependence on the index or offset of the integrated Schmidt-Kennicutt relation for the two CO lines, and obtain indices consistent with N=1 for the various sub-populations. However, including low-z "normal" galaxies increases our best-fit Schmidt-Kennicutt index to N~1.2. While we do not reproduce correlations between the CO line width and luminosity, we do reproduce correlations between CO excitation and star formation efficiency.
  • Radio emission at cm wavelengths from highly star-forming galaxies, such as SMGs, is dominated by synchrotron radiation arising from supernova activity. Using deep, high-resolution ($1\sigma=2.3$ $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$; $0.75^{"}$) cm radio-continuum observations taken by the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project, we studied the radio-emitting sizes of a flux-limited sample of SMGs in the COSMOS field. Of the 39 SMGs studied here, 3 GHz emission was detected towards 18 of them ($\sim46\pm11\%$) with S/N ratios in the range of ${\rm S/N=4.2-37.4}$. Using 2D elliptical Gaussian fits, we derived a median deconvolved major axis FWHM size of $0.54^{"}\pm 0.11^{"}$ for our 18 SMGs detected at 3 GHz. For the 15 SMGs with known redshift we derived a median linear major axis FWHM of $4.2\pm0.9$ kpc. No clear correlation was found between the radio-emitting size and the 3 GHz or submm flux density, or the redshift of the SMG. However, there is a hint of larger radio sizes at $z\sim2.5-5$ compared to lower redshifts. The sizes we derived are consistent with previous SMG sizes measured at 1.4 GHz and in mid-$J$ CO emission, but significantly larger than those seen in the (sub)mm continuum emission. One possible scenario is that SMGs have i) an extended gas component with a low dust temperature, and which can be traced by low- to mid-$J$ CO line emission and radio continuum emission, and ii) a warmer, compact starburst region giving rise to the high-$J$ line emission of CO, which could dominate the dust continuum size measurements. Because of the rapid cooling of CR electrons in dense starburst galaxies ($\sim10^4-10^5$ yr), the more extended synchrotron radio-emitting size being a result of CR diffusion seems unlikely. Instead, if SMGs are driven by galaxy mergers the radio synchrotron emission might arise from more extended magnetised ISM around the starburst region.
  • We present constraints on both the kinetic temperature of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z=8.4, and on models for heating the IGM at high-redshift with X-ray emission from the first collapsed objects. These constraints are derived using a semi-analytic method to explore the new measurements of the 21 cm power spectrum from the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), which were presented in a companion paper, Ali et al. (2015). Twenty-one cm power spectra with amplitudes of hundreds of mK^2 can be generically produced if the kinetic temperature of the IGM is significantly below the temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB); as such, the new results from PAPER place lower limits on the IGM temperature at z=8.4. Allowing for the unknown ionization state of the IGM, our measurements find the IGM temperature to be above ~5 K for neutral fractions between 10% and 85%, above ~7 K for neutral fractions between 15% and 80%, or above ~10 K for neutral fractions between 30% and 70%. We also calculate the heating of the IGM that would be provided by the observed high redshift galaxy population, and find that for most models, these galaxies are sufficient to bring the IGM temperature above our lower limits. However, there are significant ranges of parameter space that could produce a signal ruled out by the PAPER measurements; models with a steep drop-off in the star formation rate density at high redshifts or with relatively low values for the X-ray to star formation rate efficiency of high redshift galaxies are generally disfavored. The PAPER measurements are consistent with (but do not constrain) a hydrogen spin temperature above the CMB temperature, a situation which we find to be generally predicted if galaxies fainter than the current detection limits of optical/NIR surveys are included in calculations of X-ray heating.
  • We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the CO ($J = 2 \rightarrow 1$) line emission towards the $z = 6.419$ quasar SDSS J$114816.64+525150.3$ (J$1148+5251$). The molecular gas is found to be marginally resolved with a major axis of $0.9"$ (consistent with previous size measurements of the CO ($J = 7 \rightarrow 6$) emission). We observe tentative evidence for extended line emission towards the south west on a scale of ~$1.4"$, but this is only detected at $3.3\sigma$ significance and should be confirmed. The position of the molecular emission region is in excellent agreement with previous detections of low frequency radio continuum emission as well as [C ii] line and thermal dust continuum emission. These CO ($J = 2 \rightarrow 1$) observations provide an anchor for the low excitation part of the molecular line SED. We find no evidence for extended low excitation component, neither in the spectral line energy distribution nor the image. We fit a single kinetic gas temperature model of 50 K. We revisit the gas and dynamical masses in light of this new detection of a low order transition of CO, and confirm previous findings that there is no extended reservoir of cold molecular gas in J$1148+5251$, and that the source departs substantially from the low $z$ relationship between black hole mass and bulge mass. Hence, the characteristics of J$1148+5251$ at $z = 6.419$ are very similar to $z$~$2$ quasars, in the lack of a diffuse cold gas reservoir and kpc-size compactness of the star forming region.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) detections of atomic carbon line and dust continuum emission in two UV-luminous galaxies at redshift 6. The far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of these galaxies are substantially lower than similar starbursts at later cosmic epochs, indicating an evolution in the dust properties with redshift, in agreement with the evolution seen in ultraviolet (UV) attenuation by dust. The [CII] to FIR ratios are found to be higher than at low redshift showing that [CII] should be readily detectable by ALMA within the reionization epoch. One of the two galaxies shows a complex merger nature with the less massive component dominating the UV emission and the more massive component dominating the FIR line and continuum. Using the interstellar atomic carbon line to derive the systemic redshifts we investigate the velocity of Lyman alpha emission emerging from high-z galaxies. In contrast to previous work, we find no evidence for decreasing Lyman alpha velocity shifts at high-redshift. We observe an increase in velocity shifts from z$\sim$2 to z$\sim$6, consistent with the effects of increased IGM absorption.
  • A number of experiments are currently working towards a measurement of the 21 cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization. Whether or not these experiments deliver a detection of cosmological emission, their limited sensitivity will prevent them from providing detailed information about the astrophysics of reionization. In this work, we consider what types of measurements will be enabled by a next-generation of larger 21 cm EoR telescopes. To calculate the type of constraints that will be possible with such arrays, we use simple models for the instrument, foreground emission, and the reionization history. We focus primarily on an instrument modeled after the $\sim 0.1~\rm{km}^2$ collecting area Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) concept design, and parameterize the uncertainties with regard to foreground emission by considering different limits to the recently described "wedge" footprint in k-space. Uncertainties in the reionization history are accounted for using a series of simulations which vary the ionizing efficiency and minimum virial temperature of the galaxies responsible for reionization, as well as the mean free path of ionizing photons through the IGM. Given various combinations of models, we consider the significance of the possible power spectrum detections, the ability to trace the power spectrum evolution versus redshift, the detectability of salient power spectrum features, and the achievable level of quantitative constraints on astrophysical parameters. Ultimately, we find that $0.1~\rm{km}^2$ of collecting area is enough to ensure a very high significance ($\gtrsim30\sigma$) detection of the reionization power spectrum in even the most pessimistic scenarios. This sensitivity should allow for meaningful constraints on the reionization history and astrophysical parameters, especially if foreground subtraction techniques can be improved and successfully implemented.
  • The epoch of reionization power spectrum is expected to evolve strongly with redshift, and it is this variation with cosmic history that will allow us to begin to place constraints on the physics of reionization. The primary obstacle to the measurement of the EoR power spectrum is bright foreground emission. We present an analysis of observations from the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) telescope which place new limits on the HI power spectrum over the redshift range of $7.5<z<10.5$, extending previously published single redshift results to cover the full range accessible to the instrument. To suppress foregrounds, we use filtering techniques that take advantage of the large instrumental bandwidth to isolate and suppress foreground leakage into the interesting regions of $k$-space. Our 500 hour integration is the longest such yet recorded and demonstrates this method to a dynamic range of $10^4$. Power spectra at different points across the redshift range reveal the variable efficacy of the foreground isolation. Noise limited measurements of $\Delta^2$ at $k=$0.2hMpc$^{-1}$ and z$=7.55$ reach as low as (48mK)$^2$ ($1\sigma$). We demonstrate that the size of the error bars in our power spectrum measurement as generated by a bootstrap method is consistent with the fluctuations due to thermal noise. Relative to this thermal noise, most spectra exhibit an excess of power at a few sigma. The likely sources of this excess include residual foreground leakage, particularly at the highest redshift, and unflagged RFI. We conclude by discussing data reduction improvements that promise to remove much of this excess.
  • Limited studies have been performed on the radio-loud fraction in X-ray selected type 1 AGN samples. The consistency between various radio-loudness definitions also needs to be checked. We measure the radio-loudness of the 407 type 1 AGNs in the XMM-COSMOS quasar sample using nine criteria from the literature (six defined in the rest-frame and three defined in the observed frame): $R_L=\log(L_{5GHz}/L_B)$, $q_{24}=\log(L_{24\mu m}/L_{1.4GHz})$, $R_{uv}=\log(L_{5GHz}/L_{2500\AA})$, $R_{i}=\log(L_{1.4GHz}/L_i)$, $R_X=\log(\nu L_{\nu}(5GHz)/L_X)$, $P_{5GHz}=\log(P_{5GHz}(W/Hz/Sr))$, $R_{L,obs}=\log(f_{1.4GHz}/f_B)$ (observed frame), $R_{i,obs}=\log(f_{1.4GHz}/f_i)$ (observed frame), and $q_{24, obs}=\log(f_{24\mu m}/f_{1.4GHz})$ (observed frame). Using any single criterion defined in the rest-frame, we find a low radio-loud fraction of $\lesssim 5\%$ in the XMM-COSMOS type 1 AGN sample, except for $R_{uv}$. Requiring that any two criteria agree reduces the radio-loud fraction to $\lesssim 2\%$ for about 3/4 of the cases. The low radio-loud fraction cannot be simply explained by the contribution of the host galaxy luminosity and reddening. The $P_{5GHz}=\log(P_{5GHz}(W/Hz/Sr))$ gives the smallest radio-loud fraction. Two of the three radio-loud fractions from the criteria defined in the observed frame without k-correction ($R_{L,obs}$ and $R_{i,obs}$) are much larger than the radio-loud fractions from other criteria.
  • We present 90 cm VLA imaging of the COSMOS field, comprising a circular area of 3.14 square degrees at 8.0"x6.0" angular resolution with an average rms of 0.5 mJy/beam. The extracted catalog contains 182 sources (down to 5.5sigma), 30 of which are multi-component sources. Using Monte Carlo artificial source simulations we derive the completeness of the catalog, and we show that our 90 cm source counts agree very well with those from previous studies. Using X-ray, NUV-NIR and radio COSMOS data to investigate the population mix of our 90 cm radio sample, we find that our sample is dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN). The average 90-20 cm spectral index (S_nu~nu**alpha, where S_nu is the flux density at frequency nu, and alpha the spectral index) of our 90 cm selected sources is -0.70, with an interquartile range of -0.90 to -0.53. Only a few ultra-steep-spectrum sources are present in our sample, consistent with results in the literature for similar fields. Our data do not show clear steepening of the spectral index with redshift. Nevertheless, our sample suggests that sources with spectral indices steeper than -1 all lie at z>1, in agreement with the idea that ultra-steep-spectrum radio sources may trace intermediate-redshift galaxies (z>1).
  • We present ALMA observations of the [CII] line and far-infrared (FIR) continuum of a normally star-forming galaxy in the reionization epoch, the z=6.96 Ly-alpha emitter (LAE) IOK-1. Probing to sensitivities of sigma_line = 240 micro-Jy/beam (40 km/s channel) and sigma_cont = 21 micro-Jy/beam, we found the galaxy undetected in both [CII] and continuum. Comparison of UV - FIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of IOK-1, including our ALMA limit, with those of several types of local galaxies (including the effects of the cosmic microwave background, CMB, on the FIR continuum) suggests that IOK-1 is similar to local dwarf/irregular galaxies in SED shape rather than highly dusty/obscured galaxies. Moreover, our 3 sigma FIR continuum limit, corrected for CMB effects, implies intrinsic dust mass M_dust < 6.4 x 10^7 M_sun, FIR luminosity L_FIR < 3.7 x 10^{10} L_sun (42.5 - 122.5 micron), total IR luminosity L_IR < 5.7 x 10^{10} L_sun (8 - 1000 micron) and dust-obscured star formation rate (SFR) < 10 M_sun/yr, if we assume that IOK-1 has a dust temperature and emissivity index typical of local dwarf galaxies. This SFR is 2.4 times lower than one estimated from the UV continuum, suggesting that < 29% of the star formation is obscured by dust. Meanwhile, our 3 sigma [CII] flux limit translates into [CII] luminosity, L_[CII] < 3.4 x 10^7 L_sun. Locations of IOK-1 and previously observed LAEs on the L_[CII] vs. SFR and L_[CII]/L_FIR vs. L_FIR diagrams imply that LAEs in the reionization epoch have significantly lower gas and dust enrichment than AGN-powered systems and starbursts at similar/lower redshifts, as well as local star-forming galaxies.
  • We present new constraints on the 21cm Epoch of Reionization (EoR) power spectrum derived from 3 months of observing with a 32-antenna, dual-polarization deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. In this paper, we demonstrate the efficacy of the delay-spectrum approach to avoiding foregrounds, achieving over 8 orders of magnitude of foreground suppression (in $\textrm{mK}^2$). Combining this approach with a procedure for removing off-diagonal covariances arising from instrumental systematics, we achieve a best 2-sigma upper limit of $(41\,\textrm{mK})^2$ for $k=0.27 h\textrm{Mpc}^{-1}$ at $z=7.7$. This limit falls within an order of magnitude of the brighter predictions of the expected 21cm EoR signal level. Using the upper limits set by these measurements, we generate new constraints on the brightness temperature of 21cm emission in neutral regions for various reionization models. We show that for several ionization scenarios, our measurements are inconsistent with cold reionization. That is, heating of the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) is necessary to remain consistent with the constraints we report. Hence, we have suggestive evidence that by $z=7.7$, the HI has been warmed from its cold primordial state, probably by X-rays from high-mass X-ray binaries or mini-quasars. The strength of this evidence depends on the ionization state of the IGM, which we are not yet able to constrain. This result is consistent with standard predictions for how reionization might have proceeded.
  • We present deep IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) observations, searching for CO-emission toward two massive, non-lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z=3.216 and 4.058. With one low significance CO detection (3.5 sigma) and one sensitive upper limit, we find that the CO lines are >~ 3-4 times weaker than expected based on the relation between IR and CO luminosities followed by similarly, massive galaxies at z=0-2.5. This is consistent with a scenario in which these galaxies have low metallicity, causing an increased CO-to-H_2 conversion factor, i.e., weaker CO-emission for a given molecular (H_2) mass. The required metallicities at z>3 are lower than predicted by the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) at these redshifts, consistent with independent evidence. Unless our galaxies are atypical in this respect, detecting molecular gas in normal galaxies at z>3 may thus remain challenging even with ALMA.
  • We present ALMA observations of the [C II] 158 micron fine structure line and dust continuum emission from the host galaxies of five redshift 6 quasars. We also report complementary observations of 250 GHz dust continuum and CO (6-5) line emission from the z=6.00 quasar SDSS J231038.88+185519.7. The ALMA observations were carried out in the extended array at 0.7" resolution. We have detected the line and dust continuum in all five objects. The derived [C II] line luminosities are 1.6x10^{9} to 8.8x10^{9} Lsun and the [C II]-to-FIR luminosity ratios are 3.0-5.6x10^{-4}, which is comparable to the values found in other high-redshift quasar-starburst systems and local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. The sources are marginally resolved and the intrinsic source sizes (major axis FWHM) are constrained to be 0.3" to 0.6" (i.e., 1.7 to 3.5 kpc) for the [C II] line emission and 0.2" to 0.4" (i.e., 1.2 to 2.3 kpc) for the continuum. These measurements indicate that there is vigorous star formation over the central few kpc in the quasar host galaxies. The ALMA observations also constrain the dynamical properties of the atomic gas in the starburst nuclei. The intensity-weighted velocity maps of three sources show clear velocity gradients. Such velocity gradients are consistent with a rotating, gravitationally bound gas component, although they are not uniquely interpreted as such. Under the simplifying assumption of rotation, the implied dynamical masses within the [C II]-emitting regions are of order 10^{10} to 10^{11} Msun. Given these estimates, the mass ratios between the SMBHs and the spheroidal bulge are an order of magnitude higher than the mean value found in local spheroidal galaxies, which is in agreement with results from previous CO observations of high redshift quasars.
  • We present new observations with the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) with the aim of measuring the properties of foreground emission for 21cm Epoch of Reionization experiments at 150 MHz. We focus on the footprint of the foregrounds in cosmological Fourier space to understand which modes of the 21cm power spectrum will most likely be compromised by foreground emission. These observations confirm predictions that foregrounds can be isolated to a "wedge"-like region of 2D (k-perpendicular, k-parallel)-space, creating a window for cosmological studies at higher k-parallel values. We also find that the emission extends past the nominal edge of this wedge due to spectral structure in the foregrounds, with this feature most prominent on the shortest baselines. Finally, we filter the data to retain only this "unsmooth" emission and image specific k-parallel modes of it. The resultant images show an excess of power at the lowest modes, but no emission can be clearly localized to any one region of the sky. This image is highly suggestive that the most problematic foregrounds for 21cm EoR studies will not be easily identifiable bright sources, but rather an aggregate of fainter emission.
  • We present observations taken with the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) of the Centaurus A field in the frequency range 114 to 188 MHz. The resulting image has a 25' resolution, a dynamic range of 3500 and an r.m.s. of 0.5 Jy\beam (for a beam size of 25' x 23'). A spectral index map of Cen A is produced across the full band. The spectral index distribution is qualitatively consistent with electron reacceleration in regions of excess turbulence in the radio lobes, as previously identified morphologically. Hence, there appears to be an association of 'severe weather' in radio lobes with energy input into the relativistic electron population. We compare the PAPER large scale radio image with the X-ray image from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. There is a tentative correlation between radio and X-ray features at the end of the southern lobe, some 200 kpc from the nucleus, as might be expected from inverse Compton scattering of the CMB by the relativistic electrons also responsible for the radio synchrotron emission. The magnetic fields derived from the (possible) IC and radio emission are of similar magnitude to fields derived under the minimum pressure assumptions, ~ 1 {\mu}G. However, the X-ray field is complex, with large scale gradients and features possibly unrelated to Cen A. If these X-ray features are unrelated to Cen A, then these fields are lower limits.
  • We report on a measurement of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation field, T_CMB, at z = 0.88582 by imaging HC3N (3-2) and (5-4) absorption in the foreground galaxy of the gravitationally lens magnified radio source PKS 1830-211 using the Very Long Baseline Array and the phased Very Large Array. Low-resolution imaging of the data yields a value of Trot = 5.6+2.5-0.9 K, for the rotational temperature, Trot, which is consistent with the temperature of the cosmic microwave background at the absorber's redshift of 2.73(1+z) K. However, our high-resolution imaging reveals that the absorption peak position of the foreground gas is offset from the continuum peak position of the synchrotron radiation from PKS 1830-211 SW, which indicates that the absorbing cloud is covering only part of the emission from PKS 1830-211, rather than the entire core-jet region. This changes the line-to-continuum ratios, and we find Trot between 1.1 and 2.5 K, which is lower than the expected value. This shows that previous, Trot, measurements could be biased due to unresolved structure.
  • We have been carrying out a systematic survey of the star formation and ISM properties in the host galaxies of z~6 quasars. Our 250 GHz observations, together with available data from the literature, yield a sample of 14 z~6 quasars that are bright in millimeter dust continuum emission with estimated FIR luminosities of a few 10^12 to 10^13 Lsun. Most of these millimeter-detected z~6 quasars have also been detected in molecular CO line emission, indicating molecular gas masses on order of 10^10 Msun. We have searched for [C II] 158 micron fine structure line emission toward four of the millimeter bright z~6 quasars with ALMA and all of them have been detected. All these results suggest massive star formation at rates of about 600 to 2000 Msun/yr over the central few kpc region of these quasar host galaxies.