• We present the results of a closure phase analysis of 3 mm very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements performed on Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We have analyzed observations made in May 2015 using the Very Long Baseline Array, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano and obtained non-zero closure phase measurements on several station triangles - indicative of a non-point-symmetric source structure. The data are fitted with an asymmetric source structure model in Sgr A*, represented by a simple two-component model, which favours a fainter component due East of the main source. This result is discussed in light of a scattering screen with substructure or an intrinsically asymmetric source.
  • Our aim is to characterize the polarized continuum emission properties including intensity, polarization position angle, and polarization percentage of Sgr A* at $\sim$100 (3.0 mm), $\sim$230 (1.3 mm), $\sim$345 (0.87 mm), $\sim$500 (0.6 mm), and $\sim$700 GHz (0.43 mm). We report continuum emission properties of Sgr A* at the above frequency bands, based on the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations. We measured flux densities of Sgr A* from ALMA single pointing and mosaic observations. We performed sinusoidal fittings to the observed (XX-YY)/I intensity ratios, to derive the polarization position angles and polarization percentages. We successfully detect polarized continuum emission from all observed frequency bands. We observed lower Stokes I intensity at $\sim$700 GHz than that at $\sim$500 GHz, which suggests that emission at $\gtrsim$500 GHz is from optically thin part of a synchrotron emission spectrum. Both the Stokes I intensity and the polarization position angle at our highest observing frequency of $\sim$700 GHz, may be varying with time. However, we do not yet detect variation in the polarization percentage at $>$500 GHz. The polarization percentage at $\sim$700 GHz is likely lower than that at $\sim$500 GHz. By comparing the $\sim$500 GHz and $\sim$700 GHz observations with the observations at lower frequency bands, we suggest that the intrinsic polarization position angle of Sgr A* is varying with time. This paper also reports the measurable polarization properties from the observed calibration quasars. The future simultaneous multi-frequency polarization observations are required for clarifying the time and frequency variation of polarization position angle and polarization percentage.
  • We report linearly polarized continuum emission properties of Sgr A* at $\sim$492 GHz, based on the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations. We used the observations of the likely unpolarized continuum emission of Titan, and the observations of C\textsc{i} line emission, to gauge the degree of spurious polarization. The Stokes I flux of 3.6$\pm$0.72 Jy during our run is consistent with extrapolations from the previous, lower frequency observations. We found that the continuum emission of Sgr A* at $\sim$492 GHz shows large amplitude differences between the XX and the YY correlations. The observed intensity ratio between the XX and YY correlations as a function of parallactic angle may be explained by a constant polarization position angle of $\sim$158$^{\circ}$$\pm$3$^{\circ}$. The fitted polarization percentage of Sgr A* during our observational period is 14\%$\pm$1.2\%. The calibrator quasar J1744-3116 we observed at the same night can be fitted to Stokes I = 252 mJy, with 7.9\%$\pm$0.9\% polarization in position angle P.A. = 4.1$^{\circ}$$\pm$4.2$^{\circ}$. The observed polarization percentage and polarization position angle in the present work appear consistent with those expected from longer wavelength observations in the period of 1999-2005. In particular, the polarization position angle at 492 GHz, expected from the previously fitted 167$^{\circ}$$\pm$7$^{\circ}$ intrinsic polarization position angle and (-5.6$\pm$0.7)$\times$10$^{5}$ rotation measure, is 155$^{+9}_{-8}$, which is consistent with our new measurement of polarization position angle within 1$\sigma$. The polarization percentage and the polarization position angle may be varying over the period of our ALMA 12m Array observations, which demands further investigation with future polarization observations.
  • Radio and mm-wavelength observations of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the radio source associated with the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy, show that it behaves as a partially self-absorbed synchrotron-emitting source. The measured size of Sgr A* shows that the mm-wavelength emission comes from a small region and consists of the inner accretion flow and a possible collimated outflow. Existing observations of Sgr A* have revealed a time lag between light curves at 43 GHz and 22 GHz, which is consistent with a rapidly expanding plasma flow and supports the presence of a collimated outflow from the environment of an accreting black hole. Here we wish to measure simultaneous frequency-dependent time lags in the light curves of Sgr A* across a broad frequency range to constrain direction and speed of the radio-emitting plasma in the vicinity of the black hole. Light curves of Sgr A* were taken in May 2012 using ALMA at 100 GHz using the VLA at 48, 39, 37, 27, 25.5, and 19 GHz. As a result of elevation limits and the longitude difference between the stations, the usable overlap in the light curves is approximately four hours. Although Sgr A* was in a relatively quiet phase, the high sensitivity of ALMA and the VLA allowed us to detect and fit maxima of an observed minor flare where flux density varied by ~10%. The fitted times of flux density maxima at frequencies from 100 GHz to 19 GHz, as well as a cross-correlation analysis, reveal a simple frequency-dependent time lag relation where maxima at higher frequencies lead those at lower frequencies. Taking the observed size-frequency relation of Sgr A* into account, these time lags suggest a moderately relativistic (lower estimates: 0.5c for two-sided, 0.77c for one-sided) collimated outflow.