• We study linear rough partial differential equations in the setting of [Friz and Hairer, Springer, 2014, Chapter 12]. More precisely, we consider a linear parabolic partial differential equation driven by a deterministic rough path $\mathbf{W}$ of H\"older regularity $\alpha$ with $1/3 < \alpha \le 1/2$. Based on a stochastic representation of the solution of the rough partial differential equation, we propose a regression Monte Carlo algorithm for spatio-temporal approximation of the solution. We provide a full convergence analysis of the proposed approximation method which essentially relies on the new bounds for the higher order derivatives of the solution in space. Finally, a comprehensive simulation study showing the applicability of the proposed algorithm is presented.
  • We consider rough stochastic volatility models where the driving noise of volatility has fractional scaling, in the "rough" regime of Hurst parameter $H < 1/2$. This regime recently attracted a lot of attention both from the statistical and option pricing point of view. With focus on the latter, we sharpen the large deviation results of Forde-Zhang (2017) in a way that allows us to zoom-in around the money while maintaining full analytical tractability. More precisely, this amounts to proving higher order moderate deviation estimates, only recently introduced in the option pricing context. This in turn allows us to push the applicability range of known at-the-money skew approximation formulae from CLT type log-moneyness deviations of order $t^{1/2}$ (recent works of Al\`{o}s, Le\'{o}n & Vives and Fukasawa) to the wider moderate deviations regime.
  • A new paradigm recently emerged in financial modelling: rough (stochastic) volatility, first observed by Gatheral et al. in high-frequency data, subsequently derived within market microstructure models, also turned out to capture parsimoniously key stylized facts of the entire implied volatility surface, including extreme skews that were thought to be outside the scope of stochastic volatility. On the mathematical side, Markovianity and, partially, semi-martingality are lost. In this paper we show that Hairer's regularity structures, a major extension of rough path theory, which caused a revolution in the field of stochastic partial differential equations, also provides a new and powerful tool to analyze rough volatility models.
  • This work addresses the problem of pricing American basket options in a multivariate setting, which includes among others, the Bachelier and the Black-Scholes models. In high dimensions, nonlinear partial differential equation methods for solving the problem become prohibitively costly due to the curse of dimensionality. Instead, this work proposes to use a stopping rule that depends on the dynamics of a low-dimensional Markovian projection of the given basket of assets. It is shown that the ability to approximate the original value function by a lower-dimensional approximation is a feature of the dynamics of the system and is unaffected by the path-dependent nature of the American basket option. Assuming that we know the density of the forward process and using the Laplace approximation, we first efficiently evaluate the diffusion coefficient corresponding to the low-dimensional Markovian projection of the basket. Then, we approximate the optimal early-exercise boundary of the option by solving a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman partial differential equation in the projected, low-dimensional space. The resulting near-optimal early-exercise boundary is used to produce an exercise strategy for the high-dimensional option, thereby providing a lower bound for the price of the American basket option. A corresponding upper bound is also provided. These bounds allow to assess the accuracy of the proposed pricing method. Indeed, our approximate early-exercise strategy provides a straightforward lower bound for the American basket option price. Following a duality argument due to Rogers, we derive a corresponding upper bound solving only the low-dimensional optimal control problem. Numerically, we show the feasibility of the method using baskets with dimensions up to fifty. In these examples, the resulting option price relative errors are only of the order of few percent.
  • We consider the problem of pricing basket options in a multivariate Black Scholes or Variance Gamma model. From a numerical point of view, pricing such options corresponds to moderate and high dimensional numerical integration problems with non-smooth integrands. Due to this lack of regularity, higher order numerical integration techniques may not be directly available, requiring the use of methods like Monte Carlo specifically designed to work for non-regular problems. We propose to use the inherent smoothing property of the density of the underlying in the above models to mollify the payoff function by means of an exact conditional expectation. The resulting conditional expectation is unbiased and yields a smooth integrand, which is amenable to the efficient use of adaptive sparse grid cubature. Numerical examples indicate that the high-order method may perform orders of magnitude faster compared to Monte Carlo or Quasi Monte Carlo in dimensions up to 35.
  • We consider a stochastic model for the dynamics of the two-sided limit order book (LOB). Our model is flexible enough to allow for a dependence of the price dynamics on volumes. For the joint dynamics of best bid and ask prices and the standing buy and sell volume densities, we derive a functional limit theorem, which states that our LOB model converges in distribution to a fully coupled SDE-SPDE system when the order arrival rates tend to infinity and the impact of an individual order arrival on the book as well as the tick size tends to zero. The SDE describes the bid/ask price dynamics while the SPDE describes the volume dynamics.
  • New classes of stochastic differential equations can now be studied using rough path theory (e.g. Lyons et al. [LCL07] or Friz--Hairer [FH14]). In this paper we investigate, from a numerical analysis point of view, stochastic differential equations driven by Gaussian noise in the aforementioned sense. Our focus lies on numerical implementations, and more specifically on the saving possible via multilevel methods. Our analysis relies on a subtle combination of pathwise estimates, Gaussian concentration, and multilevel ideas. Numerical examples are given which both illustrate and confirm our findings.
  • The state price density of a basket, even under uncorrelated Black-Scholes dynamics, does not allow for a closed from density. (This may be rephrased as statement on the sum of lognormals and is especially annoying for such are used most frequently in Financial and Actuarial Mathematics.) In this note we discuss short time and small volatility expansions, respectively. The method works for general multi-factor models with correlations and leads to the analysis of a system of ordinary (Hamiltonian) differential equations. Surprisingly perhaps, even in two asset Black-Scholes situation (with its flat geometry), the expansion can degenerate at a critical (basket) strike level; a phenomena which seems to have gone unnoticed in the literature to date. Explicit computations relate this to a phase transition from a unique to more than one "most-likely" paths (along which the diffusion, if suitably conditioned, concentrates in the afore-mentioned regimes). This also provides a (quantifiable) understanding of how precisely a presently out-of-money basket option may still end up in-the-money.
  • In this article we consider affine generalizations of the Merton jump diffusion model [Merton, J. Fin. Econ., 1976] and the respective pricing of European options. On the one hand, the Brownian motion part in the Merton model may be generalized to a log-Heston model, and on the other hand, the jump part may be generalized to an affine process with possibly state dependent jumps. While the characteristic function of the log-Heston component is known in closed form, the characteristic function of the second component may be unknown explicitly. For the latter component we propose an approximation procedure based on the method introduced in [Belomestny et al., J. Func. Anal., 2009]. We conclude with some numerical examples.
  • The difference of the values of observables for the time-independent Schroedinger equation, with matrix valued potentials, and the values of observables for ab initio Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, of the ground state, depends on the probability to be in excited states and the electron/nuclei mass ratio. The paper first proves an error estimate (depending on the electron/nuclei mass ratio and the probability to be in excited states) for this difference of microcanonical observables, assuming that molecular dynamics space-time averages converge, with a rate related to the maximal Lyapunov exponent. The error estimate is uniform in the number of particles and the analysis does not assume a uniform lower bound on the spectral gap of the electron operator and consequently the probability to be in excited states can be large. A numerical method to determine the probability to be in excited states is then presented, based on Ehrenfest molecular dynamics and stability analysis of a perturbed eigenvalue problem.
  • In this work, we present an extension to the context of Stochastic Reaction Networks (SRNs) of the forward-reverse representation introduced in "Simulation of forward-reverse stochastic representations for conditional diffusions", a 2014 paper by Bayer and Schoenmakers. We apply this stochastic representation in the computation of efficient approximations of expected values of functionals of SNR bridges, i.e., SRNs conditioned to its values in the extremes of given time-intervals. We then employ this SNR bridge-generation technique to the statistical inference problem of approximating the reaction propensities based on discretely observed data. To this end, we introduce a two-phase iterative inference method in which, during phase I, we solve a set of deterministic optimization problems where the SRNs are replaced by their reaction-rate Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) approximation; then, during phase II, we apply the Monte Carlo version of the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm starting from the phase I output. By selecting a set of over dispersed seeds as initial points for phase I, the output of parallel runs from our two-phase method is a cluster of approximate maximum likelihood estimates. Our results are illustrated by numerical examples.
  • We develop a forward-reverse EM (FREM) algorithm for estimating parameters that determine the dynamics of a discrete time Markov chain evolving through a certain measurable state space. As a key tool for the construction of the FREM method we develop forward-reverse representations for Markov chains conditioned on a certain terminal state. These representations may be considered as an extension of the earlier work Bayer and Schoenmakers [2013] on conditional diffusions. We proof almost sure convergence of our algorithm for a Markov chain model with curved exponential family structure. On the numerical side we give a complexity analysis of the forward-reverse algorithm by deriving its expected cost. Two application examples are discuss to demonstrate the scope of possible applications ranging from models based on continuous time processes to discrete time Markov chain models.
  • In this paper we derive stochastic representations for the finite dimensional distributions of a multidimensional diffusion on a fixed time interval, conditioned on the terminal state. The conditioning can be with respect to a fixed point or more generally with respect to some subset. The representations rely on a reverse process connected with the given (forward) diffusion as introduced in Milstein, Schoenmakers and Spokoiny [Bernoulli 10 (2004) 281-312] in the context of a forward-reverse transition density estimator. The corresponding Monte Carlo estimators have essentially root-$N$ accuracy, and hence they do not suffer from the curse of dimensionality. We provide a detailed convergence analysis and give a numerical example involving the realized variance in a stochastic volatility asset model conditioned on a fixed terminal value of the asset.
  • Cubature on Wiener space [Lyons, T.; Victoir, N.; Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 8 January 2004 vol. 460 no. 2041 169-198] provides a powerful alternative to Monte Carlo simulation for the integration of certain functionals on Wiener space. More specifically, and in the language of mathematical finance, cubature allows for fast computation of European option prices in generic diffusion models. We give a random walk interpretation of cubature and similar (e.g. the Ninomiya--Victoir) weak approximation schemes. By using rough path analysis, we are able to establish weak convergence for general path-dependent option prices.
  • We consider the problem of optimizing the expected logarithmic utility of the value of a portfolio in a binomial model with proportional transaction costs with a long time horizon. By duality methods, we can find expressions for the boundaries of the no-trade-region and the asymptotic optimal growth rate, which can be made explicit for small transaction costs. Here we find that, contrary to the classical results in continuous time, the size of the no-trade-region as well as the asymptotic growth rate depend analytically on the level of transaction costs, implying a linear first order effect of perturbations of (small) transaction costs. We obtain the asymptotic expansion by an almost explicit construction of the shadow price process.
  • Born-Oppenheimer dynamics is shown to provide an accurate approximation of time-independent Schr\"odinger observables for a molecular system with an electron spectral gap, in the limit of large ratio of nuclei and electron masses, without assuming that the nuclei are localized to vanishing domains. The derivation, based on a Hamiltonian system interpretation of the Schr\"odinger equation and stability of the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi equation, bypasses the usual separation of nuclei and electron wave functions, includes caustic states and gives a different perspective on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, Schr\"odinger Hamiltonian systems and numerical simulation in molecular dynamics modeling at constant energy microcanonical ensembles.
  • Cubature methods, a powerful alternative to Monte Carlo due to Kusuoka~[Adv.~Math.~Econ.~6, 69--83, 2004] and Lyons--Victoir~[Proc.~R.~Soc.\\Lond.~Ser.~A 460, 169--198, 2004], involve the solution to numerous auxiliary ordinary differential equations. With focus on the Ninomiya-Victoir algorithm~[Appl.~Math.~Fin.~15, 107--121, 2008], which corresponds to a concrete level $5$ cubature method, we study some parametric diffusion models motivated from financial applications, and exhibit structural conditions under which all involved ODEs can be solved explicitly and efficiently. We then enlarge the class of models for which this technique applies, by introducing a (model-dependent) variation of the Ninomiya-Victoir method. Our method remains easy to implement; numerical examples illustrate the savings in computation time.
  • We prove a stochastic Taylor expansion for SPDEs and apply this result to obtain cubature methods, i. e. high order weak approximation schemes for SPDEs, in the spirit of T. Lyons and N. Victoir. We can prove a high-order weak convergence for well-defined classes of test functions if the process starts at sufficiently regular initial values. We can also derive analogous results in the presence of L\'evy processes of finite type, here the results seem to be new even in finite dimension. Several numerical examples are added.
  • We provide a simple proof of Tchakaloff's Theorem on the existence of cubature formulas of degree $m$ for Borel measures with moments up to order $m$. The result improves known results for non-compact supports, since we do not need conditions on $(m+1)$st moments.