• Determining the principal energy pathways for allosteric communication in biomolecules, that occur as a result of thermal motion, remains challenging due to the intrinsic complexity of the systems involved. Graph theory provides an approach for making sense of such complexity, where allosteric proteins can be represented as networks of amino acids. In this work, we establish the eigenvector centrality metric in terms of the mutual information, as a mean of elucidating the allosteric mechanism that regulates the enzymatic activity of proteins. Moreover, we propose a strategy to characterize the range of the physical interactions that underlie the allosteric process. In particular, the well known enzyme, imidazol glycerol phosphate synthase (IGPS), is utilized to test the proposed methodology. The eigenvector centrality measurement successfully describes the allosteric pathways of IGPS, and allows to pinpoint key amino acids in terms of their relevance in the momentum transfer process. The resulting insight can be utilized for refining the control of IGPS activity, widening the scope for its engineering. Furthermore, we propose a new centrality metric quantifying the relevance of the surroundings of each residue. In addition, the proposed technique is validated against experimental solution NMR measurements yielding fully consistent results. Overall, the methodologies proposed in the present work constitute a powerful and cost effective strategy to gain insight on the allosteric mechanism of proteins.
  • Quantum-based molecular dynamics (QMD) is a highly accurate and transferable method for material science simulations. However, the time scales and system sizes accessible to QMD are typically limited to picoseconds and a few hundred atoms. These constraints arise due to expensive self-consistent ground-state electronic structure calculations that can often scale cubically with the number of atoms. Linearly scaling methods depend on computing the density matrix P from the Hamiltonian matrix H by exploiting the sparsity in both matrices. The second-order spectral projection (SP2) algorithm is an O(N) algorithm that computes P with a sequence of 40-50 matrix-matrix multiplications. In this paper, we present task-based implementations of a recently developed data-parallel graph-based approach to the SP2 algorithm, G-SP2. We represent the density matrix P as an undirected graph and use graph partitioning techniques to divide the computation into smaller independent tasks. The partitions thus obtained are generally not of equal size and give rise to undesirable load imbalances in standard MPI-based implementations. This load-balancing challenge can be mitigated by dynamically scheduling parallel computations at runtime using task-based programming models. We develop task-based implementations of the data-parallel G-SP2 algorithm using both Intel's Concurrent Collections (CnC) as well as the Charm++ programming model and evaluate these implementations for future use. Scaling and performance results of our implementations are investigated for representative segments of QMD simulations for solvated protein systems containing more than 10,000 atoms.
  • In this work, we explore graph partitioning (GP) using quantum annealing on the D-Wave 2X machine. Motivated by a recently proposed graph-based electronic structure theory applied to quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, graph partitioning is used for reducing the calculation of the density matrix into smaller subsystems rendering the calculation more computationally efficient. Unconstrained graph partitioning as community clustering based on the modularity metric can be naturally mapped into the Hamiltonian of the quantum annealer. On the other hand, when constraints are imposed for partitioning into equal parts and minimizing the number of cut edges between parts, a quadratic unconstrained binary optimization (QUBO) reformulation is required. This reformulation may employ the graph complement to fit the problem in the Chimera graph of the quantum annealer. Partitioning into 2 parts, 2^N parts recursively, and k parts concurrently are demonstrated with benchmark graphs, random graphs, and small material system density matrix based graphs. Results for graph partitioning using quantum and hybrid classical-quantum approaches are shown to equal or out-perform current "state of the art" methods.