• Quantum communication has been successfully implemented in optical fibres and through free-space [1-3]. Fibre systems, though capable of fast key rates and low quantum bit error rates (QBERs), are impractical in communicating with destinations without an established fibre link [4]. Free-space quantum channels can overcome such limitations and reach long distances with the advent of satellite-to-ground links [5-8]. Shorter line-of-sight free-space links have also been realized for intra-city conditions [2, 9]. However, turbulence, resulting from local fluctuations in refractive index, becomes a major challenge by adding errors and losses [10]. Recently, an interest in investigating the possibility of underwater quantum channels has arisen, which could provide global secure communication channels among submersibles and boats [11-13]. Here, we investigate the effect of turbulence on an underwater quantum channel using twisted photons in outdoor conditions. We study the effect of turbulence on transmitted QBERs, and compare different QKD protocols in an underwater quantum channel showing the feasibility of high-dimensional encoding schemes. Our work may open the way for secure high-dimensional quantum communication between submersibles, and provides important input for potential submersibles-to-satellite quantum communication.
  • Models of quantum systems on curved space-times lack sufficient experimental verification. Some speculative theories suggest that quantum properties, such as entanglement, may exhibit entirely different behavior to purely classical systems. By measuring this effect or lack thereof, we can test the hypotheses behind several such models. For instance, as predicted by Ralph and coworkers [T C Ralph, G J Milburn, and T Downes, Phys. Rev. A, 79(2):22121, 2009, T C Ralph and J Pienaar, New Journal of Physics, 16(8):85008, 2014], a bipartite entangled system could decohere if each particle traversed through a different gravitational field gradient. We propose to study this effect in a ground to space uplink scenario. We extend the above theoretical predictions of Ralph and coworkers and discuss the scientific consequences of detecting/failing to detect the predicted gravitational decoherence. We present a detailed mission design of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Space QUEST (Space - Quantum Entanglement Space Test) mission, and study the feasibility of the mission schema.
  • The measurement of quantum signals that traveled through long distances is of fundamental and technological interest. We present quantum-limited coherent measurements of optical signals, sent from a satellite in geostationary Earth orbit to an optical ground station. We bound the excess noise that the quantum states could have acquired after having propagated 38600 km through Earth's gravitational potential as well as its turbulent atmosphere. Our results indicate that quantum communication is feasible in principle in such a scenario, highlighting the possibility of a global quantum key distribution network for secure communication.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) promises information-theoretically secure communication, and is already on the verge of commercialization. Thus far, different QKD protocols have been proposed theoretically and implemented experimentally [1, 2]. The next step will be to implement high-dimensional protocols in order to improve noise resistance and increase the data rate [3-7]. Hitherto, no experimental verification of high-dimensional QKD in the single-photon regime has been conducted outside of the laboratory. Here, we report the realization of such a single-photon QKD system in a turbulent free-space link of 0.3 km over the city of Ottawa, taking advantage of both the spin and orbital angular momentum photonic degrees of freedom. This combination of optical angular momenta allows us to create a 4-dimensional state [8]; wherein, using a high-dimensional BB84 protocol [3, 4], a quantum bit error rate of 11\% was attained with a corresponding secret key rate of 0.65 bits per sifted photon. While an error rate of 5\% with a secret key rate of 0.43 bits per sifted photon is achieved for the case of 2-dimensional structured photons. Even through moderate turbulence without active wavefront correction, it is possible to securely transmit information carried by structured photons, opening the way for intra-city high-dimensional quantum communications under realistic conditions.
  • With the emergence of an information society, the idea of protecting sensitive data is steadily gaining importance. Conventional encryption methods may not be sufficient to guarantee data protection in the future. Quantum key distribution (QKD) is an emerging technology that exploits fundamental physical properties to guarantee perfect security in theory. However, it is not easy to ensure in practice that the implementations of QKD systems are exactly in line with the theoretical specifications. Such theory-practice deviations can open loopholes and compromise the security. Several of such loopholes have been discovered and investigated in the last decade. These activities have motivated the proposal and implementation of appropriate countermeasures, thereby preventing future attacks and enhancing the practical security of QKD. This article introduces the so-called field of quantum hacking by summarizing a variety of attacks and their prevention mechanisms.
  • The notions of qubits and coherent states correspond to different physical systems and are described by specific formalisms. Qubits are associated with a two-dimensional Hilbert space and can be illustrated on the Bloch sphere. In contrast, the underlying Hilbert space of coherent states is infinite-dimensional and the states are typically represented in phase space. For the particular case of binary coherent state alphabets these otherwise distinct formalisms can equally be applied. We capitalize this formal connection to analyse the properties of optimally cloned binary coherent states. Several practical and near-optimal cloning schemes are discussed and the associated fidelities are compared to the performance of the optimal cloner.
  • Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are an important building block for linear, nonlinear and quantum optical experiments. In such experiments, independent control of coupling rates to different modes can lead to improved conversion efficiencies and greater flexibility in generation of non-classical states based on parametric down conversion. In this work, we introduce a scheme which enables selective out-coupling of WGMs belonging to a specific polarization family, while the orthogonally polarized modes remain largely unperturbed. Our technique utilizes material birefringence in both the resonator and coupler such that a negative (positive) birefringence allows selective coupling to TE (TM) polarized WGMs. We formulate a new coupling condition suitable for describing the case where the refractive indices of the resonator and the coupler are almost the same, from which we derive the criterion for polarization-selective coupling. We experimentally demonstrate our proposed method using a lithium niobate disk resonator coupled to a lithium niobate prism, where we show a 22dB suppression of coupling to TM modes relative to TE modes.
  • Optical Whispering Gallery Modes (WGMs) derive their name from a famous acoustic phenomenon of guiding a wave by a curved boundary observed nearly a century ago. This phenomenon has a rather general nature, equally applicable to sound and all other waves. It enables resonators of unique properties attractive both in science and engineering. Very high quality factors of optical WGM resonators persisting in a wide wavelength range spanning from radio frequencies to ultraviolet light, their small mode volume, and tunable in- and out- coupling make them exceptionally efficient for nonlinear optical applications. Nonlinear optics facilitates interaction of photons with each other and with other physical systems, and is of prime importance in quantum optics. In this paper we review numerous applications of WGM resonators in nonlinear and quantum optics. We outline the current areas of interest, summarize progress, highlight difficulties, and discuss possible future development trends in these areas.
  • Quantum repeaters rely on an interfacing of flying qubits with quantum memories. The most common implementations include a narrowband single photon matched in bandwidth and central frequency to an atomic system. Previously, we demonstrated the compatibility of our versatile source of heralded single photons, which is based on parametric down-conversion in a triply-resonant whispering-gallery mode resonator, with alkaline transitions [Schunk et al., Optica 2, 773 (2015)]. In this paper, we analyze our source in terms of phase matching, available wavelength-tuning mechanisms, and applications to narrow-band atomic systems. We resonantly address the D1 transitions of cesium and rubidium with this optical parametric oscillator pumped above its oscillation threshold. Below threshold, the efficient coupling of single photons to atomic transitions heralded by single telecom-band photons is demonstrated. Finally, we present an accurate analytical description of our observations. Providing the demonstrated flexibility in connecting various atomic transitions with telecom wavelengths, we show a promising approach to realize an essential building block for quantum repeaters.
  • We present the quantum theory of the measurement of bosonic particles by multipixel detectors. For the sake of clarity, we specialize on beams of photons. We study the measurement of different spatial beam characteristics, as position and width. The limits of these measurements are set by the quantum nature of the light field. We investigate how both, detector imperfections and finite pixel size affect the photon counting distribution. An analytic theory for the discretized measurement scheme is derived. We discuss the results and compare them to the theory presented by Chille et al. in "Quantum uncertainty in the beam width of spatial optical modes," Opt. Express 23, 32777 (2015), which investigates the beam width noise independently of the measurement system. Finally, we present numerical simulations which furnish realistic and promising predictions for possible experimental studies.
  • The accuracy in determining the quantum state of a system depends on the type of measurement performed. Homodyne and heterodyne detection are the two main schemes in continuous-variable quantum information. The former leads to a direct reconstruction of the Wigner function of the state, whereas the latter samples its Husimi $Q$~function. We experimentally demonstrate that heterodyne detection outperforms homodyne detection for almost all Gaussian states, the details of which depend on the squeezing strength and thermal noise.
  • Digital signatures guarantee the authorship of electronic communications. Currently used "classical" signature schemes rely on unproven computational assumptions for security, while quantum signatures rely only on the laws of quantum mechanics. Previous quantum signature schemes have used unambiguous quantum measurements. Such measurements, however, sometimes give no result, reducing the efficiency of the protocol. Here, we instead use heterodyne detection, which always gives a result, although there is always some uncertainty. We experimentally demonstrate feasibility in a real environment by distributing signature states through a noisy 1.6km free-space channel. Our results show that continuous-variable heterodyne detection improves the signature rate for this type of scheme and therefore represents an interesting direction in the search for practical quantum signature schemes.
  • Squeezed light generation has come of age. Significant advances on squeezed light generation has been made over the last 30 years - from the initial, conceptual experiment in 1985 till todays top- tuned, application-oriented setups. Here we review the main experimental platforms for generating quadrature squeezed light that has been investigated the last 30 years.
  • We present an experimental method for the generation of amplitude squeezed high-order vector beams. The light is modified twice by a spatial light modulator such that the vector beam is created by means of a collinear interferometric technique. A major advantage of this approach is that it avoids systematic losses, which are detrimental as they cause decoherence in continuous-variable quantum systems. The utilisation of a spatial light modulator (SLM) gives the flexibility to switch between arbitrary mode orders. The conversion efficiency with our setup is only limited by the efficiency of the SLM. We show the experimental generation of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) modes with radial indices up to 1 and azimuthal indices up to 3 with complex polarization structures and a quantum noise reduction up to -0.9dB$\pm$0.1dB. The corresponding polarization structures are studied in detail by measuring the spatial distribution of the Stokes parameters.
  • Linking classical microwave electrical circuits to the optical telecommunication band is at the core of modern communication. Future quantum information networks will require coherent microwave-to-optical conversion to link electronic quantum processors and memories via low-loss optical telecommunication networks. Efficient conversion can be achieved with electro-optical modulators operating at the single microwave photon level. In the standard electro-optic modulation scheme this is impossible because both, up- and downconverted, sidebands are necessarily present. Here we demonstrate true single sideband up- or downconversion in a triply resonant whispering gallery mode resonator by explicitly addressing modes with asymmetric free spectral range. Compared to previous experiments, we show a three orders of magnitude improvement of the electro-optical conversion efficiency reaching 0.1% photon number conversion for a 10GHz microwave tone at 0.42mW of optical pump power. The presented scheme is fully compatible with existing superconducting 3D circuit quantum electrodynamics technology and can be used for non-classical state conversion and communication. Our conversion bandwidth is larger than 1MHz and not fundamentally limited.
  • As the generation of squeezed states of light has become a standard technique in laboratories, attention is increasingly directed towards adapting the optical parameters of squeezed beams to the specific requirements of individual applications. It is known that imaging, metrology, and quantum information may benefit from using squeezed light with a tailored transverse spatial mode. However, experiments have so far been limited to generating only a few squeezed spatial modes within a given setup. Here, we present the generation of single-mode squeezing in Laguerre-Gauss and Bessel-Gauss modes, as well as an arbitrary intensity pattern, all from a single setup using a spatial light modulator (SLM). The degree of squeezing obtained is limited mainly by the initial squeezing and diffractive losses introduced by the SLM, while no excess noise from the SLM is detectable at the measured sideband. The experiment illustrates the single-mode concept in quantum optics and demonstrates the viability of current SLMs as flexible tools for the spatial reshaping of squeezed light.
  • Tracking the kinematics of fast-moving objects is an important diagnostic tool for science and engineering. Existing optical methods include high-speed CCD/CMOS imaging, streak cameras, lidar, serial time-encoded imaging and sequentially timed all-optical mapping. Here, we demonstrate an entirely new approach to positional and directional sensing based on the concept of classical entanglement in vector beams of light. The measurement principle relies on the intrinsic correlations existing in such beams between transverse spatial modes and polarization. The latter can be determined from intensity measurements with only a few fast photodiodes, greatly outperforming the bandwidth of current CCD/CMOS devices. In this way, our setup enables two-dimensional real-time sensing with temporal resolution in the GHz range. We expect the concept to open up new directions in photonics-based metrology and sensing.
  • Quantum information technology strongly relies on coupling of optical photons with narrowband quantum systems, such as quantum dots, color centers, and atomic systems. This coupling requires matching the optical wavelength and bandwidth to the desired system, which presents a considerable problem for most available sources of quantum light. Here we demonstrate coupling of alkali dipole transitions with a tunable source of photon pairs. Our source is based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a triply-resonant whispering-gallery mode resonator. For this, we have developed novel wavelength tuning mechanisms, which allow for a coarse tuning to either cesium or rubidium wavelength with subsequent continuous fine-tuning to the desired transition. As a demonstration of the functionality of the source, we performed a heralded single photon measurement of the atomic decay. We present a major advance in controlling the spontaneous down-conversion process, which makes our bright source of single photons now compatible with a plethora of narrow-band resonant systems.
  • By performing quantum-noise-limited optical heterodyne detection, we observe polarization noise in light after propagation through a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF). We compare the noise spectrum to the one of a standard fiber and find an increase of noise even though the light is mainly transmitted in air in a hollow-core PCF. Combined with our simulation of the acoustic vibrational modes in the hollow-core PCF, we are offering an explanation for the polarization noise with a variation of guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering (GAWBS). Here, instead of modulating the strain in the fiber core as in a solid core fiber, the acoustic vibrations in hollow-core PCF influence the effective refractive index by modulating the geometry of the photonic crystal structure. This induces polarization noise in the light guided by the photonic crystal structure.
  • A beam splitter is a basic linear optical element appearing in many optics experiments and is frequently used as a continuous-variable entangler transforming a pair of input modes from a separable Gaussian state into an entangled state. However, a beam splitter is a passive operation that can create entanglement from Gaussian states only under certain conditions. One such condition is that the input light is squeezed. We demonstrate experimentally that a beam splitter can create entanglement even from modes which do not possess such a squeezing provided that they are correlated to but not entangled with a third mode. Specifically, we show that a beam splitter can create three-mode entanglement by acting on two modes of a three-mode fully separable Gaussian state without entangling the two modes themselves. This beam splitter property is a key mechanism behind the performance of the protocol for entanglement distribution by separable states. Moreover, the property also finds application in collaborative quantum dense coding in which decoding of transmitted information is assisted by interference with a mode of the collaborating party.
  • We theoretically investigate the quantum uncertainty in the beam width of transverse optical modes and, for this purpose, define a corresponding quantum operator. Single mode states are studied as well as multimode states with small quantum noise. General relations are derived, and specific examples of different modes and quantum states are examined. For the multimode case, we show that the quantum uncertainty in the beam width can be completely attributed to the amplitude quadrature uncertainty of one specific mode, which is uniquely determined by the field under investigation. This discovery provides us with a strategy for the reduction of the beam width noise by an appropriate choice of the quantum state.
  • Identifying the mode numbers in whispering-gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) is important for tailoring them to experimental needs. Here we report on a novel experimental mode analysis technique based on the combination of frequency analysis and far-field imaging for high mode numbers of large WGMRs. The radial mode numbers q and the angular mode numbers p=$\ell$-m are identified and labeled via far-field imaging. The polar mode numbers $\ell$ are determined unambiguously by fitting the frequency differences between individual whispering gallery modes (WGMs). This allows for the accurate determination of the geometry and the refractive index at different temperatures of the WGMR. For future applications in classical and quantum optics, this mode analysis enables one to control the narrow-band phase-matching conditions in nonlinear processes such as second-harmonic generation or parametric down-conversion.
  • The impossibility of perfectly discriminating non orthogonal quantum states imposes far-reaching consequences both on quantum and classical communication schemes. We propose and numerically analyze an optimized quantum receiver for the discrimination of phase encoded signals. Our scheme outperforms the standard quantum limit and approaches the Helstrom bound for any signal power. The discrimination is performed via an optimized, feedback-mediated displacement prior to a photon counting detector. We provide a detailed analysis of the influence of excess noise and technical imperfections on the average error probability. The results demonstrate the receiver's robustness and show that it can outperform any classical receiver over a wide range of realistic parameters.
  • An eavesdropper Eve may probe a quantum key distribution (QKD) system by sending a bright pulse from the quantum channel into the system and analyzing the back-reflected pulses. Such Trojan-horse attacks can breach the security of the QKD system if appropriate safeguards are not installed or if they can be fooled by Eve. We present a risk analysis of such attacks based on extensive spectral measurements, such as transmittance, reflectivity, and detection sensitivity of some critical components used in typical QKD systems. Our results indicate the existence of wavelength regimes where the attacker gains considerable advantage as compared to launching an attack at 1550 nm. We also propose countermeasures to reduce the risk of such attacks.
  • In this work we review and further develop the controversial concept of "classical entanglement" in optical beams. We present a unified theory for different kinds of light beams exhibiting classical entanglement and we indicate several possible extensions of the concept. Our results shed new light upon the physics at the debated border between the classical and the quantum representations of the world.