• We present new radial velocity and trigonometric parallax measurements indicating that the unusually red and photometrically variable T2 dwarf 2MASS J13243553+6358281 is a member of the young (~150 Myr) AB Doradus moving group based on its space velocity. We estimate its model-dependent mass in the range 11-12 $M_{\rm Jup}$ at the age of the AB Doradus moving group, and its trigonometric parallax distance of 12.7 $\pm$ 1.5 pc makes it one of the nearest known isolated planetary-mass objects. The unusually red continuum of 2MASS J13243553+6358281 in the near-infrared was previously suspected to be caused by an unresolved L+T brown dwarf binary, although it was never observed with high-spatial resolution imaging. This new evidence of youth suggests that a low surface gravity may be sufficient to explain this peculiar feature. Using the new parallax we find that its absolute $J$-band magnitude is ~0.4 mag fainter than equivalent-type field brown dwarfs, suggesting that the binary hypothesis is unlikely. The fundamental properties of 2MASS J13243553+6358281 follow the spectral type sequence of other known high-likelihood members of the AB Doradus moving group. The effective temperature of 2MASS J13243553+6358281 provides the first precise constraint on the L/T transition at a known young age, and indicates that it happens at a temperature of ~1150 K at ~150 Myr, compared to ~1250 K for field brown dwarfs.
  • We present 2MASS J11151597+1937266, a recently identified low-surface gravity L dwarf, classified as an L2$\gamma$ based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical spectroscopy. We confirm this spectral type with near-infrared spectroscopy, which provides further evidence that 2MASS J11151597+1937266 is a low-surface gravity L dwarf. This object also shows significant excess mid-infrared flux, indicative of circumstellar material; and its strong H$\alpha$ emission (EW$_{\mathrm{H}\alpha}=560\pm82$ \AA) is an indicator of enhanced magnetic activity or weak accretion. Comparison of its spectral energy distribution to model photospheres yields an effective temperature of $1724^{+184}_{-38}$ K. We also provide a revised distance estimate of $37\pm6$ pc using a spectral type-luminosity relationship for low-surface gravity objects. The 3-dimensional galactic velocities and positions of 2MASS J11151597+1937266 do not match any known young association or moving group. Assuming a probable age in the range of 5-45 Myr, the model-dependent estimated mass of this object is between 7-21 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$, making it a potentially isolated planetary-mass object. We also identify a candidate co-moving, young stellar companion, 2MASS J11131089+2110086.
  • We present the Late-Type Extension to the Motion Verified Red Stars (LaTE-MoVeRS) catalog, containing 46,463 photometric late-type ($>$ M5) dwarfs within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. Proper motions were computed for objects combining astrometry from the SDSS Data Release 12 (DR12), the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) Point Source Catalog (PSC), and the \emph{Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} (\emph{WISE}) AllWISE datasets. LaTE-MoVeRS objects were required to have significant proper motion ($\mu_\mathrm{tot} \geqslant 2\sigma_{\mu_\mathrm{tot}}$). Using the LaTE-MoVeRS sample and \emph{Gaia} Data Release 1, we estimate \emph{Gaia} will be $\sim$64\% complete for very-low-mass objects ($>$ M5) in comparison to the combined SDSS+2MASS+\emph{WISE} dataset ($i < 21.3$). We computed photometric distances and estimated stellar effective temperatures for the LaTE-MoVeRS catalog. The majority of the dwarfs in the sample have distances $< 150$ pc and $T_\mathrm{eff} < 3000$ K. Thirteen objects were identified within LaTE-MoVeRS with estimated photometric distances within 25 pc that have not been previously identified as nearby objects. We also identified one new object with a large amount of excess mid-infrared flux that has not been previously identified (2MASS J11151597$+$1937266). This object appears to be an L2$\gamma$ at $\sim$50 pc showing spectroscopic signs of a flaring event (e.g., strong Hydrogen Balmer emission lines). This object does not exhibit kinematics similar to any known kinematic association. The LaTE-MoVeRS catalog is available through SDSS CasJobs and VizieR.
  • We present a photometric catalog of 8,735,004 proper motion selected low-mass stars (KML-spectral types) within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint, from the combined SDSS Data Release 10 (DR10), Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) Point Source Catalog (PSC), and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) AllWISE catalog. Stars were selected using $r-i$, $i-z$, $r-z$, $z-J$, and $z-W1$ colors, and SDSS, WISE, and 2MASS astrometry was combined to compute proper motions. The resulting 3,518,150 stars were augmented with proper motions for 5,216,854 earlier type stars from the combined SDSS and United States Naval Observatory B1.0 catalog (USNO-B). We used SDSS+USNO-B proper motions to determine the best criteria for selecting a clean sample of stars. Only stars whose proper motions were greater than their $2$$\sigma$ uncertainty were included. Our Motion Verified Red Stars (MoVeRS) catalog is available through SDSS CasJobs and VizieR.
  • We present a sample of 20 runaway M dwarf candidates (RdMs) within 1 kpc of the Sun whose Galactocentric velocities exceed 400 km s$^{-1}$. The candidates were selected from the SDSS DR7 M Dwarf Catalog of West et al. (2011). Our RdMs have SDSS+USNO-B proper motions that are consistent with those recorded in the PPMXL, LSPM, and combined WISE+SDSS+2MASS catalogs. Sixteen RdMs are classified as dwarfs, while the remaining four RdMs are subdwarfs. We model the Galactic potential using a bulge-disk-halo profile (Kenyon et al. 2008; Brown et al. 2014). Our fastest RdM, with Galactocentric velocity 658.5 $\pm$ 236.9 km s$^{-1}$, is a possible hypervelocity candidate, as it is unbound in 77% of our simulations. About half of our RdMs have kinematics that are consistent with ejection from the Galactic center. Seven of our RdMs have kinematics consistent with an ejection scenario from M31 or M32 to within 2{\sigma}, although our distance-limited survey makes such a realization unlikely. No more than four of our RdMs may have originated from the Leo stream. We propose that to within measurement errors, most of our bound RdMs are likely disk runaways or halo objects, and may have been accelerated through a series of multi-body interactions within the Galactic disk or possibly supernovae explosions.
  • Using the SDSS DR7 spectroscopic catalog, we searched the WISE AllWISE catalog to investigate the occurrence of warm dust, as inferred from IR excesses, around field M dwarfs (dMs). We developed SDSS/WISE color selection criteria to identify 175 dMs (from 70,841) that show IR flux greater than typical dM photosphere levels at 12 and/or 22 $\mu$m, including seven new stars within the Orion OB1 footprint. We characterize the dust populations inferred from each IR excess, and investigate the possibility that these excesses could arise from ultracool binary companions by modeling combined SEDs. Our observed IR fluxes are greater than levels expected from ultracool companions ($>3\sigma$). We also estimate that the probability the observed IR excesses are due to chance alignments with extragalactic sources is $<$ 0.1%. Using SDSS spectra we measure surface gravity dependent features (K, Na, and CaH 3), and find $<$ 15% of our sample indicate low surface gravities. Examining tracers of youth (H$\alpha$, UV fluxes, and Li absorption), we find $<$ 3% of our sample appear young, indicating we are observing a population of field stars $\gtrsim$ 1 Gyr, likely harboring circumstellar material. We investigate age-dependent properties probed by this sample, studying the disk fraction as a function of Galactic height. The fraction remains small and constant to $|Z| \sim 700$ pc, and then drops, indicating little to no trend with age. Possible explanations for disks around field dMs include: 1) collisions of planetary bodies, 2) tidal disruption of planetary bodies, or 3) failed planet formation.
  • We present the results of a Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) archival search for blue transients which lie in the magnitude range between "normal" core-collapse and superluminous supernovae (i.e. with $-21\,{\leq}M_{R\,(peak)}\,{\leq}-19$). Of the six events found after excluding all interacting Type~IIn and Ia-CSM supernovae, three (PTF09ge, 09axc and 09djl) are coincident with the centers of their hosts, one (10iam) is offset from the center, and for two (10nuj and 11glr) a precise offset can not be determined. All the central events have similar rise times to the He-rich tidal disruption candidate PS1-10jh, and the event with the best-sampled light curve also has similar colors and power-law decay. Spectroscopically, PTF09ge is He-rich, while PTF09axc and 09djl display broad hydrogen features around peak magnitude. All three central events are in low star-formation hosts, two of which are E+A galaxies. Our spectrum of the host of PS1-10jh displays similar properties. PTF10iam, the one offset event, is different photometrically and spectroscopically from the central events and its host displays a higher star formation rate. Finding no obvious evidence for ongoing galactic nuclei activity or recent star formation, we conclude that the three central transients likely arise from the tidal disruption of a star by a super-massive black hole. We compare the spectra of these events to tidal disruption candidates from the literature and find that all of these objects can be unified on a continuous scale of spectral properties. The accumulated evidence of this expanded sample strongly supports a tidal disruption origin for this class of nuclear transients.