• A systematic approach is given for engineering dissipative environments that steer quantum wavepackets along desired trajectories. The methodology is demonstrated with several illustrative examples: environment-assisted tunneling, trapping, effective mass assignment, and pseudo-relativistic behavior. Non-conservative stochastic forces do not inevitably lead to decoherence - we show that purity can be well-preserved. These findings highlight the flexibility offered by non-equilibrium open quantum dynamics.
  • Actin filaments are critical components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton, playing important roles in a number of cellular functions, such as cell migration, organelle transport, and mechanosensation. They are helical polymers with a well-defined polarity, composed of globular monomers that bind nucleotides in one of three hydrolysis states (ATP, ADP-Pi, or ADP). Mean-field models of the dynamics of actin polymerization have succeeded in, among other things, determining the nucleotide profile of an average filament and resolving the mechanisms of accessory proteins, however these models require numerical solution of a high-dimensional system of nonlinear ODE's. By truncating a set of recursion equations, the Brooks-Carlsson model reduces dimensionality to 11, but it remains nonlinear and does not admit an analytical solution, hence, significantly hindering understanding of its resulting dynamics. In this work, by taking advantage of the fast timescales of the hydrolysis states of the filament tips, we propose two model reduction schemes that achieve low dimensionality and linearity. We provide an exact solution of the resulting linear equations and use it to shed light on the dynamical behaviors of the full BC model, highlighting the relative ordering of the timescales of various collective processes, and explaining some unusual dependence of the steady-state behavior on initial conditions.
  • Although nonequilibrium work and fluctuation relations have been studied in detail within classical statistical physics, extending these results to open quantum systems has proven to be conceptually difficult. For systems that undergo decoherence but not dissipation, we argue that it is natural to define quantum work exactly as for isolated quantum systems, using the two-point measurement protocol. Complementing previous theoretical analysis using quantum channels, we show that the nonequilibrium work relation remains valid in this situation, and we test this assertion experimentally using a system engineered from an optically trapped ion. Our experimental results reveal the work relation's validity over a variety of driving speeds, decoherence rates, and effective temperatures and represent the first confirmation of the work relation for non-unitary dynamics.
  • A $\textit{shortcut to adiabaticity}$ is a recipe for generating adiabatic evolution at an arbitrary pace. Shortcuts have been developed for quantum, classical and (most recently) stochastic dynamics. A shortcut might involve a $\textit{counterdiabatic}$ Hamiltonian that causes a system to follow the adiabatic evolution at all times, or it might utilize a $\textit{fast-forward}$ potential, which returns the system to the adiabatic path at the end of the process. We develop a general framework for constructing shortcuts to adiabaticity from $\textit{flow fields}$ that describe the desired adiabatic evolution. Our approach encompasses quantum, classical and stochastic dynamics, and provides surprisingly compact expressions for both counterdiabatic Hamiltonians and fast-forward potentials. We illustrate our method with numerical simulations of a model system, and we compare our shortcuts with previously obtained results. We also consider the semiclassical connections between our quantum and classical shortcuts. Our method, like the fast-forward approach developed by previous authors, is susceptible to singularities when applied to excited states of quantum systems; we propose a simple, intuitive criterion for determining whether these singularities will arise, for a given excited state.
  • While thermodynamics is a useful tool to describe the driving of large systems close to equilibrium, fluctuations dominate the distribution of heat and work in small systems and far from equilibrium. We study the heat generated by driving a small system and change the drive parameters to analyse the transition from a drive leaving the system close to equilibrium to driving it far from equilibrium. Our system is a quantum dot in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure hosting a two-dimensional electron gas. The dot is tunnel-coupled to one part of the two-dimensional electron gas acting as a heat and particle reservoir. We use standard rate equations to model the driven dot-reservoir system and find excellent agreement with the experiment. Additionally, we quantify the fluctuations by experimentally test the theoretical concept of the arrow of time, predicting our ability to distinguish whether a process goes in the forward or backward drive direction.
  • We show how the classical action, an adiabatic invariant, can be preserved under non-adiabatic conditions. Specifically, for a time-dependent Hamiltonian $H = p^2/2m + U(q,t)$ in one degree of freedom, and for an arbitrary choice of action $I_0$, we construct a "fast-forward" potential energy function $V_{\rm FF}(q,t)$ that, when added to $H$, guides all trajectories with initial action $I_0$ to end with the same value of action. We use this result to construct a local dynamical invariant $J(q,p,t)$ whose value remains constant along these trajectories. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations. Finally, we sketch how our classical results may be used to design approximate quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity.
  • Adiabatic quantum state evolution can be accelerated through a variety of shortcuts to adiabaticity. In one approach, a counterdiabatic quantum Hamiltonian $\hat H_{CD}$ is constructed to suppress nonadiabatic excitations. In the analogous classical problem, a counterdiabatic classical Hamiltonian $H_{CD}$ ensures that the classical action remains constant even under rapid driving. Both the quantum and classical versions of this problem have been solved for the special case of scale-invariant driving, characterized by linear expansions, contractions or translations of the system. Here we investigate an example of a non-scale-invariant system -- a tilted piston. We solve exactly for the classical counterdiabatic Hamiltonian $H_{CD}(q,p,t)$, which we then quantize to obtain a Hermitian operator $\hat H_{CD}(t)$. Using numerical simulations, we find that $\hat H_{CD}$ effectively suppresses non-adiabatic excitations under rapid driving. These results offer a proof of principle -- beyond the special case of scale-invariant driving -- that quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity can successfully be constructed from their classical counterparts.
  • The difference Delta F between free energies has applications in biology, chemistry, and pharmacology. The value of Delta F can be estimated from experiments or simulations, via fluctuation theorems developed in statistical mechanics. Calculating the error in a Delta F estimate is difficult. Worse, atypical trials dominate estimates. How many trials one should perform was estimated roughly in [Jarzynski, Phys. Rev. E 73, 046105 (2006)]. We enhance the approximation with information-theoretic strategies: We quantify "dominance" with a tolerance parameter chosen by the experimenter or simulator. We bound the number of trials one should expect to perform, using the order-infinity Renyi entropy. The bound can be estimated if one implements the "good practice" of bidirectionality, known to improve estimates of Delta F. Estimating Delta F from this number of trials leads to an error that we bound approximately. Numerical experiments on a weakly interacting dilute classical gas support our analytical calculations.
  • The need for Hamiltonians with many-body interactions arises in various applications of quantum computing. However, interactions beyond two-body are difficult to realize experimentally. Perturbative gadgets were introduced to obtain arbitrary many-body effective interactions using Hamiltonians with two-body interactions only. Although valid for arbitrary $k$-body interactions, their use is limited to small $k$ because the strength of interaction is $k$'th order in perturbation theory. In this paper we develop a nonperturbative technique for obtaining effective $k$-body interactions using Hamiltonians consisting of at most $l$-body interactions with $l<k$. This technique works best for Hamiltonians with a few interactions with very large $k$ and can be used together with perturbative gadgets to embed Hamiltonians of considerable complexity in proper subspaces of two-local Hamiltonians. We describe how our technique can be implemented in a hybrid (gate-based and adiabatic) as well as solely adiabatic quantum computing scheme.
  • For discrete-state stochastic systems obeying Markovian dynamics, we establish the counterpart of the conditional reversibility theorem obtained by Gallavotti for deterministic systems [Ann. de l'Institut Henri Poincar\'e (A) 70, 429 (1999)]. Our result states that stochastic trajectories conditioned on opposite values of entropy production are related by time reversal, in the long-time limit. In other words, the probability of observing a particular sequence of events, given a long trajectory with a specified entropy production rate $\sigma$, is the same as the probability of observing the time-reversed sequence of events, given a trajectory conditioned on the opposite entropy production, $-\sigma$, where both trajectories are sampled from the same underlying Markov process. To obtain our result, we use an equivalence between conditioned ("microcanonical") and biased ("canonical") ensembles of nonequilibrium trajectories. We provide an example to illustrate our findings.
  • We establish a correspondence between two very general paradigms for systems that persist away from thermal equilibrium. In the first paradigm, a nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) is maintained by applying fixed thermodynamic forces that break detailed balance. In the second paradigm, known as a stochastic pump (SP), a time-periodic state is maintained by the periodic variation of a system's external parameters. In both cases, currents are generated and entropy is produced. Restricting ourselves to discrete-state systems, we establish a mapping between these scenarios. Given a NESS characterized by a particular set of stationary probabilities, currents and entropy production rates, we show how to construct a SP with exactly the same (time-averaged) values. The mapping works in the opposite direction as well. These results establish an equivalence between the two paradigms, by showing that stochastic pumps are able to mimic the behavior of nonequilibrium steady states, and vice-versa.
  • We introduce and study a model of time-dependent billiard systems with billiard boundaries undergoing infinitesimal wiggling motions. The so-called quivering billiard is simple to simulate, straightforward to analyze, and is a faithful representation of time-dependent billiards in the limit of small boundary displacements. We assert that when a billiard's wall motion approaches the quivering motion, deterministic particle dynamics become inherently stochastic. Particle ensembles in a quivering billiard are shown to evolve to a universal energy distribution through an energy diffusion process, regardless of the billiard's shape or dimensionality, and as a consequence universally display Fermi acceleration. Our model resolves a known discrepancy between the one-dimensional Fermi-Ulam model and the simplified static wall approximation. We argue that the quivering limit is the true fixed wall limit of the Fermi-Ulam model.
  • Transitions between nonequilibrium steady states obey a generalized Clausius inequality, which becomes an equality in the quasistatic limit. For slow but finite transitions, we show that the behavior of the system is described by a response matrix whose elements are given by a far-from-equilibrium Green-Kubo formula, involving the decay of correlations evaluated in the nonequilibrium steady state. This result leads to a fluctuation-dissipation relation between the mean and variance of the nonadiabatic entropy production, $\Delta s_{\rm na}$. Furthermore, our results extend -- to nonequilibrium steady states -- the thermodynamic metric structure introduced by Sivak and Crooks for analyzing minimal-dissipation protocols for transitions between equilibrium states.
  • For closed quantum systems driven away from equilibrium, work is often defined in terms of projective measurements of initial and final energies. This definition leads to statistical distributions of work that satisfy nonequilibrium work and fluctuation relations. While this two-point measurement definition of quantum work can be justified heuristically by appeal to the first law of thermodynamics, its relationship to the classical definition of work has not been carefully examined. In this paper we employ semiclassical methods, combined with numerical simulations of a driven quartic oscillator, to study the correspondence between classical and quantal definitions of work in systems with one degree of freedom. We find that a semiclassical work distribution, built from classical trajectories that connect the initial and final energies, provides an excellent approximation to the quantum work distribution when the trajectories are assigned suitable phases and are allowed to interfere. Neglecting the interferences between trajectories reduces the distribution to that of the corresponding classical process. Hence, in the semiclassical limit, the quantum work distribution converges to the classical distribution, decorated by a quantum interference pattern. We also derive the form of the quantum work distribution at the boundary between classically allowed and forbidden regions, where this distribution tunnels into the forbidden region. Our results clarify how the correspondence principle applies in the context of quantum and classical work distributions, and contribute to the understanding of work and nonequilibrium work relations in the quantum regime.
  • We propose a physically realizable Maxwell's demon device using a spin valve interacting unitarily for a short time with electrons placed on a tape of quantum dots, which is thermodynamically equivalent to the device introduced by Mandal and Jarzynski [PNAS 109, 11641 (2012)]. The model is exactly solvable and we show that it can be equivalently interpreted as a Brownian ratchet demon. We then consider a measurement based discrete feedback scheme, which produces identical system dynamics, but possesses a different second law inequality. We show that the second law for discrete feedback control can provide a smaller, equal or larger bound on the maximum extractable work as compared to the second law involving the tape of bits. Finally, we derive an effective master equation governing the system evolution for Poisson distributed bits on the tape (or measurement times respectively) and we show that its associated entropy production rate contains the same physical statement as the second law involving the tape of bits.
  • A shortcut to adiabaticity is a driving protocol that reproduces in a short time the same final state that would result from an adiabatic, infinitely slow process. A powerful technique to engineer such shortcuts relies on the use of auxiliary counterdiabatic fields. Determining the explicit form of the required fields has generally proven to be complicated. We present explicit counterdiabatic driving protocols for scale-invariant dynamical processes, which describe for instance expansion and transport. To this end, we use the formalism of generating functions, and unify previous approaches independently developed in classical and quantum studies. The resulting framework is applied to the design of shortcuts to adiabaticity for a large class of classical and quantum, single-particle, non-linear, and many-body systems.
  • We calculate the probability distribution of work for an exactly solvable model of a system interacting with its environment. The system of interest is a harmonic oscillator with a time dependent control parameter, the environment is modeled by $N$ independent harmonic oscillators with arbitrary frequencies, and the system-environment coupling is bilinear and not necessarily weak. The initial conditions of the combined system and environment are sampled from a microcanonical distribution and the system is driven out of equilibrium by changing the control parameter according to a prescribed protocol. In the limit of infinitely large environment, i.e. $N \rightarrow \infty$, we recover the nonequilibrium work relation and Crooks's fluctuation relation. Moreover, the microcanonical Crooks relation is verified for finite environments. Finally, we show the equivalence of multi-time correlation functions of the system in the infinite environment limit for canonical and microcanonical ensembles.
  • We obtain generalizations of the Kelvin-Planck, Clausius, and Carnot statements of the second law of thermodynamics, for situations involving information processing. To this end, we consider an information reservoir (representing, e.g. a memory device) alongside the heat and work reservoirs that appear in traditional thermodynamic analyses. We derive our results within an inclusive framework in which all participating elements -- the system or device of interest, together with the heat, work and information reservoirs -- are modeled explicitly by a time-independent, classical Hamiltonian. We place particular emphasis on the limits and assumptions under which cyclic motion of the device of interest emerges from its interactions with work, heat, and information reservoirs.
  • We describe a simple and solvable model of a device that -- like the "neat-fingered being" in Maxwell's famous thought experiment -- transfers energy from a cold system to a hot system by rectifying thermal fluctuations. In order to accomplish this task, our device requires a memory register to which it can write information: the increase in the Shannon entropy of the memory compensates the decrease in the thermodynamic entropy arising from the flow of heat against a thermal gradient. We construct the nonequilibrium phase diagram for this device, and find that it can alternatively act as an eraser of information. We discuss our model in the context of the second law of thermodynamics.
  • Transitionless quantum driving achieves adiabatic evolution in a hurry, using a counter-diabatic Hamiltonian to stifle non-adiabatic transitions. Here this strategy is cast in terms of a generator of adiabatic transport, leading to a classical analogue: dissipationless classical driving. For the single-particle piston, this approach yields simple and exact expressions for both the classical and quantal counter-diabatic terms. These results are further generalized to even-power-law potentials in one degree of freedom.
  • Synthetic nanoscale complexes capable of mechanical movement are often studied theoretically using discrete-state models that involve instantaneous transitions between metastable states. A number of general results have been derived within this framework, including a "no-pumping theorem" that restricts the possibility of generating directed motion by the periodic variation of external parameters. Motivated by recent experiments using time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy [Panman et al., Science 328, 1255 (2010)], we introduce a more detailed and realistic class of models in which transitions between metastable states occur by finite-time, diffusive processes rather than sudden jumps. We show that the no-pumping theorem remains valid within this framework.
  • We present a sequence-based probabilistic formalism that directly addresses co-operative effects in networks of interacting positions in proteins, providing significantly improved contact prediction, as well as accurate quantitative prediction of free energy changes due to non-additive effects of multiple mutations. In addition to these practical considerations, the agreement of our sequence-based calculations with experimental data for both structure and stability demonstrates a strong relation between the statistical distribution of protein sequences produced by natural evolutionary processes, and the thermodynamic stability of the structures to which these sequences fold.
  • We describe a minimal model of an autonomous Maxwell demon, a device that delivers work by rectifying thermal fluctuations while simultaneously writing information to a memory register. We solve exactly for the steady-state behavior of our model, and we construct its phase diagram. We find that our device can also act as a "Landauer eraser", using externally supplied work to remove information from the memory register. By exposing an explicit, transparent mechanism of operation, our model offers a simple paradigm for investigating the thermodynamics of information processing by small systems.
  • Recent work by Teifel and Mahler [Eur. Phys. J. B 75, 275 (2010)] raises legitimate concerns regarding the validity of quantum nonequilibrium work relations in processes involving moving hard walls. We study this issue in the context of the rapidly expanding one-dimensional quantum piston. Utilizing exact solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation, we find that the evolution of the wave function can be decomposed into static and dynamic components, which have simple semiclassical interpretations in terms of particle-piston collisions. We show that nonequilibrium work relations remains valid at any finite piston speed, provided both components are included, and we study explicitly the work distribution for this model system.
  • A stochastic pump is a Markov model of a mesoscopic system evolving under the control of externally varied parameters. In the model, the system makes random transitions among a network of states. For such models, a "no-pumping theorem" has been obtained, which identifies minimal conditions for generating directed motion or currents. We provide a derivation of this result using a simple graphical construction on the network of states.