• We study the problem of exchange when 1) agents are endowed with heterogeneous indivisible objects, and 2) there is no money. In general, no rule satisfies the three central properties Pareto-efficiency, individual rationality, and strategy-proofness \cite{Sonmez1999}. Recently, it was shown that Top Trading Cycles is $\NP$-hard to manipulate \cite{FujitaEA2015}, a relaxation of strategy-proofness. However, parameterized complexity is a more appropriate framework for this and other economic settings. Certain aspects of the problem - number of objects each agent brings to the table, goods up for auction, candidates in an election \cite{consandlang2007}, legislative figures to influence \cite{christian2007complexity} - may face natural bounds or are fixed as the problem grows. We take a parameterized complexity approach to indivisible goods exchange for the first time. Our results represent good and bad news for TTC. When the size of the endowments $k$ is a fixed constant, we show that the computational task of manipulating TTC can be performed in polynomial time. On the other hand, we show that this parameterized problem is $\W[1]$-hard, and therefore unlikely to be \emph{fixed parameter tractable}.
  • We study the computational complexity of computing role colourings of graphs in hereditary classes. We are interested in describing the family of hereditary classes on which a role colouring with k colours can be computed in polynomial time. In particular, we wish to describe the boundary between the "hard" and "easy" classes. The notion of a boundary class has been introduced by Alekseev in order to study such boundaries. Our main results are a boundary class for the k-role colouring problem and the related k-coupon colouring problem which has recently received a lot of attention in the literature. The latter result makes use of a technique for generating regular graphs of arbitrary girth which may be of independent interest.
  • We give a new, simple distributed algorithm for graph colouring in paths and cycles. Our algorithm is fast and self-contained, it does not need any globally consistent orientation, and it reduces the number of colours from $10^{100}$ to $3$ in three iterations.
  • LCLs or locally checkable labelling problems (e.g. maximal independent set, maximal matching, and vertex colouring) in the LOCAL model of computation are very well-understood in cycles (toroidal 1-dimensional grids): every problem has a complexity of $O(1)$, $\Theta(\log^* n)$, or $\Theta(n)$, and the design of optimal algorithms can be fully automated. This work develops the complexity theory of LCL problems for toroidal 2-dimensional grids. The complexity classes are the same as in the 1-dimensional case: $O(1)$, $\Theta(\log^* n)$, and $\Theta(n)$. However, given an LCL problem it is undecidable whether its complexity is $\Theta(\log^* n)$ or $\Theta(n)$ in 2-dimensional grids. Nevertheless, if we correctly guess that the complexity of a problem is $\Theta(\log^* n)$, we can completely automate the design of optimal algorithms. For any problem we can find an algorithm that is of a normal form $A' \circ S_k$, where $A'$ is a finite function, $S_k$ is an algorithm for finding a maximal independent set in $k$th power of the grid, and $k$ is a constant. Finally, partially with the help of automated design tools, we classify the complexity of several concrete LCL problems related to colourings and orientations.
  • We prove several results about the complexity of the role colouring problem. A role colouring of a graph $G$ is an assignment of colours to the vertices of $G$ such that two vertices of the same colour have identical sets of colours in their neighbourhoods. We show that the problem of finding a role colouring with $1< k <n$ colours is NP-hard for planar graphs. We show that restricting the problem to trees yields a polynomially solvable case, as long as $k$ is either constant or has a constant difference with $n$, the number of vertices in the tree. Finally, we prove that cographs are always $k$-role-colourable for $1<k\leq n$ and construct such a colouring in polynomial time.