• We present detailed ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared light curves of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2012fr, which exploded in the Fornax cluster member NGC 1365. These precise high-cadence light curves provide a dense coverage of the flux evolution from $-$12 to $+$140 days with respect to the epoch of $B$-band maximum (\tmax). Supplementary imaging at the earliest epochs reveals an initial slow, nearly linear rise in luminosity with a duration of $\sim$2.5 days, followed by a faster rising phase that is well reproduced by an explosion model with a moderate amount of $^{56}$Ni mixing in the ejecta. From an analysis of the light curves, we conclude: $(i)$ explosion occurred $< 22$ hours before the first detection of the supernova, $(ii)$ the rise time to peak bolometric ($\lambda > 1800 $\AA) luminosity was $16.5 \pm 0.6$ days, $(iii)$ the supernova suffered little or no host-galaxy dust reddening, $(iv)$ the peak luminosity in both the optical and near-infrared was consistent with the bright end of normal Type Ia diversity, and $(v)$ $0.60 \pm 0.15 M_{\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni was synthesized in the explosion. Despite its normal luminosity, SN 2012fr displayed unusually prevalent high-velocity \ion{Ca}{2} and \ion{Si}{2} absorption features, and a nearly constant photospheric velocity of the \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 line at $\sim$12,000 \kms\ beginning $\sim$5 days before \tmax. Other peculiarities in the early phase photometry and the spectral evolution are highlighted. SN 2012fr also adds to a growing number of Type Ia supernovae hosted by galaxies with direct Cepheid distance measurements.
  • We present final natural system optical (ugriBV) and near-infrared (YJH) photometry of 134 supernovae (SNe) with probable white dwarf progenitors that were observed in 2004-2009 as part of the first stage of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I). The sample consists of 123 Type Ia SNe, 5 Type Iax SNe, 2 super-Chandrasekhar SN candidates, 2 Type Ia SNe interacting with circumstellar matter, and 2 SN 2006bt-like events. The redshifts of the objects range from z = 0.0037 to 0.0835; the median redshift is 0.0241. For 120 (90%) of these SNe, near-infrared photometry was obtained. Average optical extinction coefficients and color terms are derived and demonstrated to be stable during the five CSP-I observing campaigns. Measurements of the CSP-I near-infrared bandpasses are also described, and near-infrared color terms are estimated through synthetic photometry of stellar atmosphere models. Optical and near-infrared magnitudes of local sequences of tertiary standard stars for each supernova are given, and a new calibration of Y-band magnitudes of the Persson et al. (1998) standards in the CSP-I natural system is presented.
  • We present an updated analysis of the intrinsic colors of SNe Ia using the latest data release of the Carnegie Supernova Project. We introduce a new light-curve parameter very similar to stretch that is better suited for fast-declining events, and find that these peculiar types can be seen as extensions to the population of "normal" SNe Ia. With a larger number of objects, an updated fit to the Lira relation is presented along with evidence for a dependence on the late-time slope of the B-V color-curves with stretch and color. Using the full wavelength range from u to H band, we place constraints on the reddening law for the sample as a whole and also for individual events/hosts based solely on the observed colors. The photometric data continue to favor low values of Rv, though with large variations from event to event, indicating an intrinsic distribution. We confirm the findings of other groups that there appears to be a correlation between the derived reddening law, Rv, and the color excess, E(B-V), such that larger E(B-V) tends to favor lower Rv. The intrinsic u-band colors show a relatively large scatter that cannot be explained by variations in Rv or by the Goobar (2008) power-law for circumstellar dust, but rather is correlated with spectroscopic features of the supernova and is therefore likely due to metallicity effects.
  • High-dispersion observations of the Na I D 5890, 5896 and K I 7665, 7699 interstellar lines, and the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms in the spectra of 32 Type Ia supernovae are used as an independent means of probing dust extinction. We show that the dust extinction of the objects where the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms is detected is consistent with the visual extinction derived from the supernova colors. This strongly suggests that the dust producing the extinction is predominantly located in the interstellar medium of the host galaxies and not in circumstellar material associated with the progenitor system. One quarter of the supernovae display anomalously large Na I column densities in comparison to the amount of dust extinction derived from their colors. Remarkably, all of the cases of unusually strong Na I D absorption correspond to "Blueshifted" profiles in the classification scheme of Sternberg et al. (2011). This coincidence suggests that outflowing circumstellar gas is responsible for at least some of the cases of anomalously large Na I column densities. Two supernovae with unusually strong Na I D absorption showed essentially normal K I column densities for the dust extinction implied by their colors, but this does not appear to be a universal characteristic. Overall, we find the most accurate predictor of individual supernova extinction to be the equivalent width of the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms, and provide an empirical relation for its use. Finally, we identify ways of producing significant enhancements of the Na abundance of circumstellar material in both the single-degenerate and double-degenerate scenarios for the progenitor system.
  • This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts, and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further study the correlations between spectroscopic and photometric parameters such as light-curve decline rate and color. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the pW of Si II absorption features are very good indicators of light-curve decline rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that parameters such as pW2(SiII4130) and pW6(SiII5972) provide precise calibrations of the peak B-band luminosity with dispersions of ~0.15 mag. In the search for a secondary parameter in the calibration of peak luminosity for SNe Ia, we find a ~2--3-sigma correlation between B-band Hubble residuals and the velocity at maximum light of S II and Si II lines.
  • We present the first definitive measurement of the absolute magnitude of RR Lyrae c-type variable stars (RRc) determined purely from statistical parallax. We use a sample of 247 RRc selected from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) for which high-quality light curves, photometry and proper motions are available. We obtain high-resolution echelle spectra for these objects to determine radial velocities and abundances as part of the Carnegie RR Lyrae Survey (CARRS). We find that M_(V,RRc) = 0.52 +/- 0.11 at a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.59. This is to be compared with previous estimates for RRab stars (M_(V,RRab) = 0.75 +/- 0.13 and the only direct measurement of an RRc absolute magnitude (RZ Cephei, M_(V, RRc) = 0.27 +/- 0.17). We find the bulk velocity of the halo to be (W_pi, W_theta, W_z) = (10.9,34.9,7.2) km/s in the radial, rotational and vertical directions with dispersions (sigma_(W_pi), sigma_(W_theta), sigma_(W_z)) = (154.7, 103.6, 93.8) km/s. For the disk, we find (W_pi, W_theta, W_z) = (8.5, 213.2, -22.1) km/s with dispersions (sigma_(W_pi), sigma_(W_theta), sigma_(W_z)) = (63.5, 49.6, 51.3) km/s. Finally, we suggest that UCAC2 proper motion errors may be overestimated by about 25%
  • Comparing the ejecta velocities at maximum brightness and narrow circumstellar/interstellar Na D absorption line profiles of a sample of 23 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), we determine that the properties of SN Ia progenitor systems and explosions are intimately connected. As demonstrated by Sternberg et al. (2011), half of all SNe Ia with detectable Na D absorption at the host-galaxy redshift in high-resolution spectroscopy have Na D line profiles with significant blueshifted absorption relative to the strongest absorption component, which indicates that a large fraction of SN Ia progenitor systems have strong outflows. In this study, we find that SNe Ia with blueshifted circumstellar/interstellar absorption systematically have higher ejecta velocities and redder colors at maximum brightness relative to the rest of the SN Ia population. This result is robust at a 98.9-99.8% confidence level, providing the first link between the progenitor systems and properties of the explosion. This finding is further evidence that the outflow scenario is the correct interpretation of the blueshifted Na D absorption, adding additional confirmation that some SNe Ia are produced from a single-degenerate progenitor channel. An additional implication is that either SN Ia progenitor systems have highly asymmetric outflows that are also aligned with the SN explosion or SNe Ia come from a variety of progenitor systems where SNe Ia from systems with strong outflows tend to have more kinetic energy per unit mass than those from systems with weak or no outflows.
  • We analyze the standardizability of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the near-infrared (NIR) by investigating the correlation between observed peak NIR absolute magnitude and post-maximum B-band decline rate. A sample of 27 low-redshift SNe Ia observed by the Carnegie Supernova Project between 2004 to 2007 is used. All 27 objects have pre-maximum coverage in optical bands, with a subset of 13 having pre-maximum NIR observations as well. We describe the methods used to derive absolute peak magnitudes and decline rates from both spline- and template-fitting procedures, and confirm prior findings that fitting templates to SNe Ia light curves in the NIR is problematic due to the diversity of post-maximum behaviour of objects that are characterized by similar decline rate values, especially at high decline rates. Nevertheless, we show that NIR light curves can be reasonably fit with a template, especially if the observations begin within 5 days after NIR maximum. For the subset of 13 objects in our dataset that excludes the highly reddened and fast declining SNe Ia, and includes only those objects for which NIR observations began prior to five days after maximum light, we find modest evidence for a peak luminosity-decline rate relation in Y, and stronger evidence in J and H. Using Rv values differing from the canonical value of 3.1 is shown to have little effect on the results. A Hubble diagram is presented for the NIR bands and the B band. The resulting scatter for the combined NIR bands is 0.13 mag, while the B band produces a scatter of 0.22 mag. The data suggest that applying a correction to SNe Ia peak luminosities for decline rate is likely to be beneficial in the J and H bands to make SNe Ia more precise distance indicators, but of only marginal importance in the Y band.
  • (Abridged) The presence of unburned material in the ejecta of normal Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) is investigated using early-time spectroscopy obtained by the CSP. The tell-tale signature of pristine material from a C+O white dwarf progenitor star is the presence of carbon. The most prominent carbon lines in optical spectra of SNeIa are due to C II. We find that at least 30% of the objects in the sample show an absorption at ~6300 AA which is attributed to C II 6580. An association to H_alpha is considered to be unlikely. These findings imply a larger incidence of carbon in SNeIa ejecta than previously noted. We show how observational biases and physical conditions may hide these C II lines, and account for the scarcity of previous carbon detections. This relatively large frequency of carbon detections has crucial implications on our understanding of the explosive process. The observations indicate that carbon is present merely ~1000 km s^-1 above the bulk of Si II. Spectral modeling shows the detections are consistent with a mass of carbon of 10^-3--10^-2 M_sun. This would imply substantial mixing, which may be related to asymmetries of the flame propagation or clumps of unburned material along the line of sight. However, the uniformity of the relation between C II and Si II velocities is not consistent with the latter scenario. The observational properties of SNeIa with and without carbon signatures are compared. A trend toward bluer color and lower luminosity is found for objects with carbon.
  • In providing an independent measure of the expansion history of the Universe, the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) has observed 71 high-z Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the near-infrared bands Y and J. These can be used to construct rest-frame i-band light curves which, when compared to a low-z sample, yield distance moduli that are less sensitive to extinction and/or decline-rate corrections than in the optical. However, working with NIR observed and i-band rest frame photometry presents unique challenges and has necessitated the development of a new set of observational tools in order to reduce and analyze both the low-z and high-z CSP sample. We present in this paper the methods used to generate uBVgriYJH light-curve templates based on a sample of 24 high-quality low-z CSP SNe. We also present two methods for determining the distances to the hosts of SN Ia events. A larger sample of 30 low-z SNe Ia in the Hubble Flow are used to calibrate these methods. We then apply the method and derive distances to seven galaxies that are so nearby that their motions are not dominated by the Hubble flow.
  • We present the analysis of the first set of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project. Well-sampled, high-precision optical (ugriBV) and near-infrared (NIR; YJHKs) light curves obtained in a well-understood photometric system are used to provide light-curve parameters, and ugriBVYJH template light curves. The intrinsic colors at maximum light are calibrated to compute optical--NIR color excesses for the full sample, thus allowing the properties of the reddening law in the host galaxies to be studied. A low value of Rv~1.7, is derived when using the entire sample of SNe. However, when the two highly reddened SNe in the sample are excluded, a value Galactic standard of Rv~3.2 is obtained. The colors of these two events are well matched by a reddening model due to circumstellar dust. The peak luminosities are calibrated using a two-parameter linear fit to the decline rates and the colors, or alternatively, the color excesses. In both cases, dispersions in absolute magnitude of 0.12--0.16 mag are obtained, depending on the filter-color combination. In contrast to the results obtained from color excesses, these fits give Rv~1--2, even when the two highly reddened SNe are excluded. This discrepancy suggests that, beyond the "normal" interstellar reddening produced in the host galaxies, there is an intrinsic dispersion in the colors of SNe Ia which is correlated with luminosity but independent of the decline rate. Finally, a Hubble diagram is produced by combining the results of the fits for each filter. The resulting scatter of 0.12 mag appears to be limited by peculiar velocities as evidenced by the strong correlation between the distance-modulus residuals among the different filters. The implication is that the actual precision of SN Ia distances is 3--4%.
  • The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) is a five-year survey being carried out at the Las Campanas Observatory to obtain high-quality light curves of ~100 low-redshift Type Ia supernovae in a well-defined photometric system. Here we present the first release of photometric data that contains the optical light curves of 35 Type Ia supernovae, and near-infrared light curves for a subset of 25 events. The data comprise 5559 optical (ugriBV) and 1043 near-infrared (YJHKs) data points in the natural system of the Swope telescope. Twenty-eight supernovae have pre-maximum data, and for 15 of these, the observations begin at least 5 days before B maximum. This is one of the most accurate datasets of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae published to date. When completed, the CSP dataset will constitute a fundamental reference for precise determinations of cosmological parameters, and serve as a rich resource for comparison with models of Type Ia supernovae.
  • The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) is designed to measure the luminosity distance for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as a function of redshift, and to set observational constraints on the dark energy contribution to the total energy content of the Universe. The CSP differs from other projects to date in its goal of providing an I-band {rest-frame} Hubble diagram. Here we present the first results from near-infrared (NIR) observations obtained using the Magellan Baade telescope for SNe Ia with 0.1 < z < 0.7. We combine these results with those from the low-redshift CSP at z <0.1 (Folatelli et al. 2009). We present light curves and an I-band Hubble diagram for this first sample of 35 SNe Ia and we compare these data to 21 new SNe Ia at low redshift. These data support the conclusion that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating. When combined with independent results from baryon acoustic oscillations (Eisenstein et al. 2005), these data yield Omega_m = 0.27 +/- 0.0 (statistical), and Omega_DE = 0.76 +/- 0.13 (statistical) +/- 0.09 (systematic), for the matter and dark energy densities, respectively. If we parameterize the data in terms of an equation of state, w, assume a flat geometry, and combine with baryon acoustic oscillations, we find that w = -1.05 +/- 0.13 (statistical) +/- 0.09 (systematic). The largest source of systematic uncertainty on w arises from uncertainties in the photometric calibration, signaling the importance of securing more accurate photometric calibrations for future supernova cosmology programs. Finally, we conclude that either the dust affecting the luminosities of SNe Ia has a different extinction law (R_V = 1.8) than that in the Milky Way (where R_V = 3.1), or that there is an additional intrinsic color term with luminosity for SNe Ia independent of the decline rate.
  • A detailed study spanning approximately a year has been conducted on the Type Ib supernova 2007Y. Imaging was obtained from X-ray to radio wavelengths, and a comprehensive set of multi-band (w2m2w1u'g'r'i'UBVYJHKs) light curves and optical spectroscopy is presented. A virtually complete bolometric light curve is derived, from which we infer a (56)Ni-mass of 0.06 M_sun. The early spectrum strongly resembles SN 2005bf and exhibits high-velocity features of CaII and H_alpha; during late epochs the spectrum shows evidence of a ejecta-wind interaction. Nebular emission lines have similar widths and exhibit profiles that indicate a lack of major asymmetry in the ejecta. Late phase spectra are modeled with a non-LTE code, from which we find (56)Ni, O and total-ejecta masses (excluding He) to be 0.06, 0.2 and 0.42 M_sun, respectively, below 4,500 km/s. The (56)Ni mass confirms results obtained from the bolometric light curve. The oxygen abundance suggests the progenitor was most likely a ~3.3 M_sun He core star that evolved from a zero-age-main-sequence mass of 10-13 M_sun. The explosion energy is determined to be ~10^50 erg, and the mass-loss rate of the progenitor is constrained from X-ray and radio observations to be <~10^-6 M_sun/yr. SN 2007Y is among the least energetic normal Type Ib supernovae ever studied.
  • In this paper we present the theoretical basis for the modeling of weakly gravitationally lensed extended sources that are polarized. This technique has been used in the past to constrain the mass profiles of galaxies projected against the jet of the quasar 3C9. Since then, work has been done to improve both the measurement and theoretical modeling of the lensing signal, which manifests itself as an alignment breaking between the morphology and the polarization, parametrized as eta-g. To this end, we present the mathematical derivation of the theoretical value of eta-g as well as numerical simulations of expected signals in polarized radio jets. We use the radio jet sources 3C9 and 1253+104 as illustrative examples of the measurement and modeling of the eta-g signal. For 3C9, we present constraints on the parameters of the two intervening lenses and quantify their confidence intervals. One lens has no measured redshift and in this case, we show the dependence of mass and mass-to-light ratio on assumed redshift.
  • We present a detailed analysis of the distance determination for one intermediate Velocity Cloud (IVC G139.6+47.6) from the ongoing DDO IVC Distance Project. Stars along the line of sight to G139.6+47.6 are examined for the presence of sodium absorption attributable to the cloud, and the distance bracket is established by astrometric and spectroscopic parallax measurements of demonstrated foreground and background stars. We detail our strategy regarding target selection, observational setup, and analysis of the data, including a discussion of wavelength calibration and sky subtraction uncertainties. We find a distance estimate of 129 (+/- 10) pc for the lower limit and 257 (+211-33) pc for the upper limit. Given the high number of stars showing absorption due to this IVC, we also discuss the small-scale covering factor of the cloud and the likely significance of non-detections for subsequent observations of this and other similar IVC's. Distance measurements of the remaining targets in the DDO IVC project will be detailed in a companion paper.
  • We present the first set of distance limits from the David Dunlap Observatory Intermediate Velocity Cloud (DDO IVC) distance project. Such distance measures are crucial to understanding the origins and dynamics of IVCs, as the distances set most of the basic physical parameters for the clouds. Currently there are very few IVCs with reliably known distances. This paper describes in some detail the basic techniques used to measure distances, with particular emphasis on the the analysis of interstellar absorption line data, which forms the basis of our distance determinations. As an example, we provide a detailed description of our distance determination for the Draco Cloud. Preliminary distance limits for a total of eleven clouds are provided.
  • We present distance estimates to a set of high-latitude intermediate-velocity HI clouds. We explore some of the physical parameters that can be determined from these results, such as cloud mass, infall velocity and height above the Galactic plane. We also briefly describe some astrophysical applications of these data and explore future work.
  • The understanding of the nature of intermediate and high velocity gas in the Milky Way is hampered by a paucity of distance estimates to individual clouds. A project has been started at the David Dunlap Observatory to address this lack of distance measures by observing early-type stars along the line of sight towards these clouds and searching for sodium doublet absorption at the clouds' systemic velocities. Distances to foreground stars (no absorption) and background stars (with absorption) are estimated from spectroscopic parallax, and thus the distance to the bracketed cloud is estimated. In this Letter, we present the first result from this ongoing project, a measurement of the distance to the Draco Cloud, which is the most studied of the intermediate velocity clouds. The result presented here is the first distance bracket which tightly constrains the position of the Draco Cloud. We briefly describe our target selection and observing methodology, and then demonstrate absorption at the velocity of the Draco Cloud for one star (TYC~4194~2188), and a lack of absorption for several other stars. We derive a distance bracket to the Draco Cloud of 463$^{+192}_{-136}$ to 618$^{+243}_{-174}$~pc.