• We present an extremely deep CO(1-0) observation of a confirmed $z=1.62$ galaxy cluster. We detect two spectroscopically confirmed cluster members in CO(1-0) with $S/N>5$. Both galaxies have log(${\cal M_{\star}}$/\msol)$>11$ and are gas rich, with ${\cal M}_{\rm mol}$/(${\cal M_{\star}}+{\cal M}_{\rm mol}$)$\sim 0.17-0.45$. One of these galaxies lies on the star formation rate (SFR)-${\cal M_{\star}}$ sequence while the other lies an order of magnitude below. We compare the cluster galaxies to other SFR-selected galaxies with CO measurements and find that they have CO luminosities consistent with expectations given their infrared luminosities. We also find that they have comparable gas fractions and star formation efficiencies (SFE) to what is expected from published field galaxy scaling relations. The galaxies are compact in their stellar light distribution, at the extreme end for all high redshift star-forming galaxies. However, their SFE is consistent with other field galaxies at comparable compactness. This is similar to two other sources selected in a blind CO survey of the HDF-N. Despite living in a highly quenched proto-cluster core, the molecular gas properties of these two galaxies, one of which may be in the processes of quenching, appear entirely consistent with field scaling relations between the molecular gas content, stellar mass, star formation rate, and redshift. We speculate that these cluster galaxies cannot have any further substantive gas accretion if they are to become members of the dominant passive population in $z<1$ clusters.
  • Using data from the DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey and the All Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey we obtain stacked X-ray maps of galaxies at 0.7 < z < 1.0 as a function of stellar mass. We compute the total X-ray counts of these galaxies and show that in the soft band (0.5--2,kev) there exists a significant correlation between galaxy X-ray counts and stellar mass at these redshifts. The best-fit relation between X-ray counts and stellar mass can be characterized by a power law with a slope of 0.58 +/- 0.1. We do not find any correlation between stellar mass and X-ray luminosities in the hard (2--7,kev) and ultra-hard (4--7,kev) bands. The derived hardness ratios of our galaxies suggest that the X-ray emission is degenerate between two spectral models, namely point-like power-law emission and extended plasma emission in the interstellar medium. This is similar to what has been observed in low redshift galaxies. Using a simple spectral model where half of the emission comes from power-law sources and the other half from the extended hot halo we derive the X-ray luminosities of our galaxies. The soft X-ray luminosities of our galaxies lie in the range 10^39-8x10^40, ergs/s. Dividing our galaxy sample by the criteria U-B > 1, we find no evidence that our results for X-ray scaling relations depend on optical color.
  • We report the detection of the Paschen-alpha emission line in the z=2.515 galaxy SMM J163554.2+661225 using Spitzer spectroscopy. SMM J163554.2+661225 is a sub-millimeter-selected infrared (IR)-luminous galaxy maintaining a high star-formation rate (SFR), with no evidence of an AGN from optical or infrared spectroscopy, nor X-ray emission. This galaxy is lensed gravitationally by the cluster Abell 2218, making it accessible to Spitzer spectroscopy. Correcting for nebular extinction derived from the H-alpha and Pa-alpha lines, the dust-corrected luminosity is L(Pa-alpha) = (2.57+/-0.43) x 10^43 erg s^-1, which corresponds to an ionization rate, Q = (1.6+/-0.3) x 10^55 photons s^-1. The instantaneous SFR is 171+/-28 solar masses per year, assuming a Salpeter-like initial mass function. The total IR luminosity derived using 70, 450, and 850 micron data is L(IR) = (5-10) x 10^11 solar luminosities, corrected for gravitational lensing. This corresponds to a SFR=90-180 solar masses per year, where the upper range is consistent with that derived from the Paschen-alpha luminosity. While the L(8 micron) / L(Pa-alpha) ratio is consistent with the extrapolated relation observed in local galaxies and star-forming regions, the rest-frame 24 micron luminosity is significantly lower with respect to local galaxies of comparable Paschen-alpha luminosity. Thus, SMM J163554.2+661225 arguably lacks a warmer dust component (T ~ 70 K), which is associated with deeply embedded star formation, and which contrasts with local galaxies with comparable SFRs. Rather, the starburst is consistent with star-forming local galaxies with intrinsic luminosities, L(IR) ~ 10^10 solar luminosities, but "scaled-up" by a factor of 10-100.
  • We present a new method to estimate the average star formation rate per unit stellar mass (SSFR) of a stacked population of galaxies. We combine the spectra of 600-1000 galaxies with similar stellar masses and parameterise the star formation history of this stacked population using a set of exponentially declining functions. The strength of the Hydrogen Balmer absorption line series in the rest-frame wavelength range 3750-4150\AA is used to constrain the SSFR by comparing with a library of models generated using the BC03 stellar population code. Our method, based on a principal component analysis (PCA), can be applied in a consistent way to spectra drawn from local galaxy surveys and from surveys at $z \sim 1$, and is only weakly influenced by attenuation due to dust. We apply our method to galaxy samples drawn from SDSS and DEEP2 to study mass-dependent growth of galaxies from $z \sim 1$ to $z \sim 0$. We find that, (1) high mass galaxies have lower SSFRs than low mass galaxies; (2) the average SSFR has decreased from $z=1$ to $z=0$ by a factor of $\sim 3-4$, independent of galaxy mass. Additionally, at $z \sim 1$ our average SSFRs are a factor of $2-2.5$ lower than those derived from multi-wavelength photometry using similar datasets. We then compute the average time (in units of the Hubble time, $t_{\rm H}(z)$) needed by galaxies of a given mass to form their stars at their current rate. At both $z=0$ and at $z=1$, this timescale decreases strongly with stellar mass from values close to unity for galaxies with masses $\sim 10^{10} M_{\odot}$, to more than ten for galaxies more massive than $ 10^{11} M_{\odot}$. Our results are in good agreement with models in which AGN feedback is more efficient at preventing gas from cooling and forming stars in high mass galaxies.
  • We have selected a sample of X-ray emitting active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in low-mass host galaxies (5e9-2e10 Msun) out to z~1. By comparing to AGNs in more massive hosts, we have found that the AGN spatial number density and the fraction of galaxies hosting AGNs depends strongly on the host mass, with the AGN host mass function peaking at intermediate mass and with the AGN fraction increasing with host mass. AGNs in low-mass hosts show strong cosmic evolution in comoving number density, the fraction of such galaxies hosting active nuclei and the comoving X-ray energy density. The integrated X-ray luminosity function is used to estimate the amount of the accreted black hole mass in these AGNs and places a strong lower limit of 12% to the fraction of local low-mass galaxies hosting black holes, though a more likely value is probably much higher (> 50%) once the heavily-obscured objects missed in current X-ray surveys are accounted for.
  • We describe observations of aromatic features at 7.7 and 11.3 um in AGN of three types including PG, 2MASS and 3CR objects. The feature has been demonstrated to originate predominantly from star formation. Based on the aromatic-derived star forming luminosity, we find that the far-IR emission of AGN can be dominated by either star formation or nuclear emission; the average contribution from star formation is around 25% at 70 and 160 um. The star-forming infrared luminosity functions of the three types of AGN are flatter than that of field galaxies, implying nuclear activity and star formation tend to be enhanced together. The star-forming luminosity function is also a function of the strength of nuclear activity from normal galaxies to the bright quasars, with luminosity functions becoming flatter for more intense nuclear activity. Different types of AGN show different distributions in the level of star formation activity, with 2MASS> PG> 3CR star formation rates.