• Angular momentum plays very important roles in the formation of PBHs in the matter-dominated phase if it lasts sufficiently long. In fact, most collapsing masses are bounced back due to centrifugal force, since angular momentum significantly grows before collapse. As a consequence, most of the formed PBHs are rapidly rotating near the extreme value $a_{*}=1$, where $a_{*}$ is the nondimensional Kerr parameter at their formation. The smaller the density fluctuation $\sigma_{H}$ at horizon entry is, the stronger the tendency towards the extreme rotation. Combining the effect of angular momentum with that of anisotropy, we estimate the black hole production rate. We find that the production rate suffers from suppression dominantly due to angular momentum for a smaller value of $\sigma_{H}$, while due to anisotrpopy for a larger value of $\sigma_{H}$. We argue that matter domination significantly enhances the production of PBHs despite the suppression. If the matter-dominated phase does not last so long, the effect of the finite duration significantly suppresses PBH formation and weakens the tendency towards large spins. (abridged)
  • The production rate of primordial black holes is often calculated by considering a nearly Gaussian distribution of cosmological perturbations, and assuming that black holes will form in regions where the amplitude of such perturbations exceeds a certain threshold. A threshold $\zeta_{\rm th}$ for the curvature perturbation is somewhat inappropriate for this purpose, because it depends significantly on environmental effects, not essential to the local dynamics. By contrast, a threshold $\delta_{\rm th}$ for the density perturbation at horizon crossing seems to provide a more robust criterion. On the other hand, the density perturbation is known to be bounded above by a maximum limit $\delta_{\rm max}$, and given that $\delta_{\rm th}$ is comparable to $\delta_{\rm max}$, the density perturbation will be far from Gaussian near or above the threshold. In this paper we provide a new plausible estimate for the primordial black hole abundance based on peak theory. In our approach, we assume a Gaussian distribution for the curvature perturbation, while an optimized criterion for PBH formation is imposed, based on the locally averaged density perturbation around the nearly spherically symmetric high peaks. Both variables are related by the full nonlinear expression derived in the long-wavelength approximation of general relativity. We find that the mass spectrum is shifted to larger mass scales by one order of magnitude or so, compared to a conventional calculation. The abundance of PBHs becomes significantly larger than the conventional one, by many orders of magnitude, mainly due to the optimized criterion for PBH formation.
  • We investigate the validity of screening mechanism of the fifth force for chameleon field in highly inhomogeneous density profile. For simplicity, we consider a static and spherically symmetric system which is composed of concentric infinitely thin shells. We calculate the fifth force profile by using a numerical method for a relatively large Compton wavelength of the chameleon field. An approximate solution is also derived for the small Compton wavelength limit. Our results show that, if the thin-shell condition for the corresponding smoothed density profile is satisfied, the fifth force is safely screened outside the system irrespective of the configuration of the shells inside the system. In contrast to the screening outside the system, we find that the fifth force can be comparable to the Newtonian gravitational force inside the system. If the system is highly inhomogeneous, the chameleon field cannot trace the potential minimum varying with the density and repeats being kicked, climbing up and rolling down the potential even when the effective mass of the chameleon field is sufficiently large in the system on average. One should not feel complacent about the wellbehavedness of the fifth force field with an averaged density distribution when we consider inhomogeneous objects.
  • The quest for fundamental limitations on physical processes is old and venerable. Here, we investigate the maximum possible power, or luminosity, that any event can produce. We show, via full nonlinear simulations of Einstein's equations, that there exist initial conditions which give rise to arbitrarily large luminosities. However, the requirement that there is no past horizon in the spacetime seems to limit the luminosity to below the Planck value, ${{\cal L}_\textrm{P}\!=\!c^5/G}$. Numerical relativity simulations of critical collapse yield the largest luminosities observed to date, ${\approx \! 0.2 {\cal L}_\textrm{P}}$. We also present an analytic solution to the Einstein equations which seems to give an unboundedly large luminosity; this will guide future numerical efforts to investigate super-Planckian luminosities.
  • We derive an observational constraint on a spherical inhomogeneity of the void centered at our position from the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background(CMB) and local measurements of the Hubble parameter. The late time behaviour of the void is assumed to be well described by the so-called $\Lambda$-Lema\^itre-Tolman-Bondi~($\Lambda$LTB) solution. Then, we restrict the models to the asymptotically homogeneous models each of which is approximated by a flat Friedmann-Lema\^itre-Robertson-Walker model. The late time $\Lambda$LTB models are parametrized by four parameters including the value of the cosmological constant and the local Hubble parameter. The other two parameters are used to parametrize the observed distance-redshift relation. Then, the $\Lambda$LTB models are constructed so that they are compatible with the given distance-redshift relation. Including conventional parameters for the CMB analysis, we characterize our models by seven parameters in total. The local Hubble measurements are reflected in the prior distribution of the local Hubble parameter. As a result of a Markov-Chains-Monte-Carlo analysis for the CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies, we found that the inhomogeneous universe models with vanishing cosmological constant are ruled out as is expected. However, a significant under-density around us is still compatible with the angular power spectrum of CMB and the local Hubble parameter.
  • The dynamical evolution of self-interacting scalars is of paramount importance in cosmological settings, and can teach us about the content of Einstein's equations. In flat space, nonlinear scalar field theories can give rise to localized, non-singular, time-dependent, long-lived solutions called {\it oscillons}. Here, we discuss the effects of gravity on the properties and formation of these structures, described by a scalar field with a double well potential. We show that oscillons continue to exist even when gravity is turned on, and we conjecture that there exists a sequence of critical solutions with infinite lifetime. Our results suggest that a new type of critical behavior appears in this theory, characterized by modulations of the lifetime of the oscillon around the scaling law and the modulations of the amplitude of the critical solutions.
  • We simulate the spindle gravitational collapse of a collisionless particle system in a 3D numerical relativity code and compare the qualitative results with the old work done by Shapiro and Teukolsky(ST). The simulation starts from the prolate-shaped distribution of particles and a spindle collapse is observed. The peak value and its spatial position of curvature invariants are monitored during the time evolution. We find that the peak value of the Kretschmann invariant takes a maximum at some moment, when there is no apparent horizon, and its value is greater for a finer resolution, which is consistent with what is reported in ST. We also find a similar tendency for the Weyl curvature invariant. Therefore, our results lend support to the formation of a naked singularity as a result of the axially symmetric spindle collapse of a collisionless particle system in the limit of infinite resolution. However, unlike in ST, our code does not break down then but go well beyond.We find that the peak values of the curvature invariants start to gradually decrease with time for a certain period of time. Another notable difference from ST is that, in our case, the peak position of the Kretschmann curvature invariant is always inside the matter distribution.
  • We investigate primordial black hole formation in the matter-dominated phase of the Universe, where nonspherical effects in gravitational collapse play a crucial role. This is in contrast to the black hole formation in a radiation-dominated era. We apply the Zel'dovich approximation, Thorne's hoop conjecture, and Doroshkevich's probability distribution and subsequently derive the production probability $\beta_{0}$ of primordial black holes. The numerical result obtained is applicable even if the density fluctuation $\sigma$ at horizon entry is of the order of unity. For $\sigma\ll 1$, we find a semi-analytic formula $\beta_{0}\simeq 0.05556 \sigma^{5}$, which is comparable with the Khlopov-Polnarev formula. We find that the production probability in the matter-dominated era is much larger than that in the radiation-dominated era for $\sigma\lesssim 0.05$, while they are comparable with each other for $\sigma\gtrsim 0.05$. We also discuss how $\sigma$ can be written in terms of primordial curvature perturbations.
  • Critical collapse of a spherically symmetric domain wall is investigated. The domain wall is made of a minimally coupled scalar field with a double well potential. We consider a sequence of the initial data which describe a momentarily static domain wall characterized by its initial radius. The time evolution is performed by a full general relativistic numerical code for spherically symmetric systems. In this paper, we use the maximal slice gauge condition, in which spacelike time slices may penetrate the black hole horizon differently from other widely used procedures. In this paper, we consider two specific shapes of the double well potential, and observe the Type II critical behavior in both cases. The mass scaling, sub-critical curvature scaling, and those fine structures are confirmed. The index of the scaling behavior agrees with the massless scalar case.
  • Spherically symmetric dust universe models with a positive cosmological constant $\Lambda$, known as $\Lambda$-Lema\^itre-Tolman-Bondi($\Lambda$LTB) models, are considered. We report a method to construct the $\Lambda$LTB model from a given distance-redshift relation observed at the symmetry center. The spherical inhomogeneity is assumed to be composed of growing modes. We derive a set of ordinary differential equations for three functions of the redshift, which specify the spherical inhomogeneity. Once a distance-redshift relation is given, with careful treatment of possible singular points, we can uniquely determine the model by solving the differential equations for each value of $\Lambda$. As a demonstration, we fix the distance-redshift relation as that of the flat $\Lambda$CDM model with $(\Omega^{\rm dis}_{\rm m0}, \Omega^{\rm dis}_{\rm \Lambda 0})=(0.3,0.7)$, where $\Omega^{\rm dis}_{\rm m0}$ and $\Omega^{\rm dis}_{\rm \Lambda 0}$ are the normalized matter density and the cosmological constant, respectively. Then, we construct the $\Lambda$LTB model for several values of $\Omega_{\rm \Lambda 0}:=\Lambda/(3H_0^2)$, where $H_0$ is the present Hubble parameter observed at the symmetry center. We obtain void structure around the symmetry center for $\Omega_{\Lambda 0}<\Omega^{\rm dis}_{\Lambda 0}$. We show the relation between the ratio $\Omega_{\Lambda0}/\Omega^{\rm dis}_{\Lambda 0}$ and the amplitude of the inhomogeneity.
  • Pulsars orbiting around the black hole at our galactic center provide us a unique testing site for gravity. In this work, we propose an approach to probe the gravity around the black hole introducing two phenomenological parameters which characterize deviation from the vacuum Einstein theory. The two phenomenological parameters are associated with the energy momentum tensor in the framework of the Einstein theory. Therefore, our approach can be regarded as the complement to the parametrized post-Newtonian framework in which phenomenological parameters are introduced for deviation of gravitational theories from general relativity. In our formulation, we take the possibility of existence of a relativistic and exotic matter component into account. Since the pulsars can be regarded as test particles, as the first step, we consider geodesic motion in the system composed of a central black hole and a perfect fluid whose distribution is static and spherically symmetric. It is found that the mass density of the fluid and a parameter of the equation of state can be determined with precision with $0.1\%$ if the density on the pulsar orbit is larger than $10^{-9}~{\rm g/cm^3}$.
  • The so-called black hole shadow is a dark region which is expected to appear in a fine image of optical observation of black holes. It is essentially an absorption cross section of black hole, and the boundary of shadow is determined by unstable circular orbits of photons (UCOP). If there exists a compact object possessing UCOP but no black hole horizon, it can provide us with the same shadow image with black holes, and a detection of shadow image cannot be a direct evidence of black hole existence. Then, this paper examine whether or not such compact objects can exist under some suitable conditions. We investigate thoroughly the static spherical polytropic ball of perfect fluid with single polytrope index, and then investigate a representative example of the piecewise polytropic ball. Our result is that the spherical polytropic ball which we have investigated cannot possess UCOP, if the sound speed at center is subluminal (slower-than-light). This means that, if the polytrope treated in this paper is a good model of stellar matter in compact objects, the detection of shadow image is regarded as a good evidence of black hole existence. As a by-product, we have found the upper bound of the mass-to-radius radio (M/R) of polytropic ball with single index, M/R < 0.281, under the subluminal-sound-speed condition.
  • The discrepancy between the amplitudes of matter fluctuations inferred from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) cluster number counts, the primary temperature, and the polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) measured by the Planck satellite can be reconciled if the local universe is embedded in an under-dense region as shown by Lee, 2014. Here using a simple void model assuming the open Friedmann-Robertson-Walker geometry and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, we investigate how deep the local under-dense region needs to be to resolve this discrepancy. Such local void, if exists, predicts the local Hubble parameter value that is different from the global Hubble constant. We derive the posterior distribution of the local Hubble parameter from a joint fitting of the Planck CMB data and SZ cluster number counts assuming the simple void model. We show that the predicted local Hubble parameter value of $H_{\rm loc}=70.1\pm0.34~{\rm km\,s^{-1}Mpc^{-1}}$ is in better agreement with direct local Hubble parameter measurements, indicating that the local void model may provide a consistent solution to the cluster number counts and Hubble parameter discrepancies.
  • The ratio of total mass $M$ to surface radius $R$ of spherical perfect fluid ball has an upper bound, $M/R < B$. Buchdahl obtained $B = 4/9$ under the assumptions; non-increasing mass density in outward direction, and barotropic equation of states. Barraco and Hamity decreased the Buchdahl's bound to a lower value $B = 3/8$ $(< 4/9)$ by adding the dominant energy condition to Buchdahl's assumptions. In this paper, we further decrease the Barraco-Hamity's bound to $B \simeq 0.3636403$ $(< 3/8)$ by adding the subluminal (slower-than-light) condition of sound speed. In our analysis, we solve numerically Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations, and the mass-to-radius ratio is maximized by variation of mass, radius and pressure inside the fluid ball as functions of mass density.
  • To clarify observational consequence of bubble nucleations in inflationary era, we analyse dynamics of a spherical domain wall in an expanding universe. We consider a spherical shell of the domain wall with tension $\sigma$ collapsing in a spherically-symmetric dust universe, which is initially separated into the open Friedmann-Lema\^itre-Robertson-Walker universe inside the shell and the Einstein-de Sitter universe outside. The domain wall shell collapses due to the tension, and sweeps the dust fluid. The universe after the collapse becomes inhomogeneous and is described by the Lema\^itre-Tolman-Bondi model. We construct solutions describing this inhomogeneous universe by solving dynamical equations obtained from Israel's junction conditions applied to this system. We find that a black hole forms after the domain wall collapse for any initial condition, and that the black hole mass at the moment of its formation is universally given by $M_{\rm BH}\simeq 17 \sigma/H_{\rm hc}$, where $H_{\rm hc}$ is the Hubble parameter at the time when the shell radius becomes equal to the Hubble radius. We also find that the dust fluid is distributed as $\rho\propto R^{3/2}$ near the central region after the collapse, where $R$ is the area radius. These features would provide observable signatures of a spherical domain wall generated in the early universe.
  • We test the validity of Isaacson's formula which states that high frequency and low amplitude gravitational waves behave as a radiation fluid on average. For this purpose, we numerically construct a solution of the vacuum Einstein equations which contains nonlinear standing gravitational waves. The solution is constructed in a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions. The time evolution is solved in a gauge in which the trace of the extrinsic curvature $K$ of the time slice becomes spatially uniform. Then, the Hubble expansion rate $H$ is defined by $H=-K/3$ and compared with the effective scale factor $L$ defined by the proper volume, area and length of the cubic box. We find that, even when the wave length of the gravitational waves is comparable to the Hubble scale, the deviation from Isaacson's formula $H\propto L^{-2}$ is at most 3\% without taking a temporal average and is below 0.1\% with a temporal average.
  • Usually the effects of isotropic inhomogeneities are not seriously taken into account in the determination of the cosmological parameters because of Copernican principle whose statement is that we do not live in the privileged domain in the universe. But Copernican principle has not been observationally confirmed yet in sufficient accuracy, and there is the possibility that there are non-negligible large-scale isotropic inhomogeneities in our universe. In this paper, we study the effects of the isotropic inhomogeneities on the determination of the cosmological parameters and show the probability that non-Copernican isotropic inhomogeneities mislead us into believing, for example, the phantom energy of the equation of state, $p=w\rho$ with $w<-1$, even in case that $w=-1$ is the true value.
  • We construct cosmological long-wavelength solutions without symmetry in general gauge conditions compatible with the long-wavelength scheme. We then specify the relationship among the solutions in different time slicings. Applying this general framework to spherical symmetry, we derive the correspondence relation between long-wavelength solutions in the constant mean curvature slicing with conformally flat spatial coordinates and asymptotic quasihomogeneous solutions in the comoving gauge and compare the numerical results of PBH formation in these two different approaches. To discuss the PBH formation, it is convenient and conventional to use $\tilde{\delta}_{c}$, the value which the averaged density perturbation at threshold in the comoving slicing would take at horizon entry in the lowest-order long-wavelength expansion. We numerically find that within compensated models, the sharper the transition from the overdense region to the FRW universe is, the larger the $\tilde{\delta}_{c}$ becomes. We suggest that, for the equation of state $p=(\Gamma-1)\rho$, we can apply the analytic formulas for the minimum $\tilde{\delta}_{c, {\rm min}}\simeq [3\Gamma/(3\Gamma+2)]\sin^{2}\left[\pi\sqrt{\Gamma-1}/(3\Gamma-2)\right]$ and the maximum $\tilde{\delta}_{c, {\rm max}}\simeq 3\Gamma/(3\Gamma+2)$. As for the threshold peak value of the curvature variable $\psi_{0,c}$, we find that the sharper the transition is, the smaller the $\psi_{0,c}$ becomes. We analytically explain this feature. Using simplified models, we also analytically deduce an environmental effect that $\psi_{0,c}$ can be significantly larger (smaller) if the underlying density perturbation of much longer wavelength is positive (negative).
  • Recently, the present authors studied perturbations in the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi cosmological model by applying the second-order perturbation theory in the dust Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe model. Before this work, the same subject was studied in some papers by analyzing linear perturbations in the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi cosmological model under the assumption proposed by Clarkson, Clifton and February, in which two of perturbation variables are negligible. However, it is a non-trivial issue in what situation the Clarkson-Clifton-February assumption is valid. In this paper, we investigate differences between these two approaches. It is shown that, in general, these two approaches are not compatible with each other. That is, in our perturbative procedure, the Clarkson-Clifton-February assumption is not valid at the order of our interest.
  • We consider a test of the Copernican Principle through observations of the large-scale structures, and for this purpose we study the self-gravitating system in a relativistic huge void universe model which does not invoke the Copernican Principle. If we focus on the the weakly self-gravitating and slowly evolving system whose spatial extent is much smaller than the scale of the cosmological horizon in the homogeneous and isotropic background universe model, the cosmological Newtonian approximation is available. Also in the huge void universe model, the same kind of approximation as the cosmological Newtonian approximation is available for the analysis of the perturbations contained in a region whose spatial size is much smaller than the scale of the huge void: the effects of the huge void are taken into account in a perturbative manner by using the Fermi-normal coordinates. By using this approximation, we derive the equations of motion for the weakly self-gravitating perturbations whose elements have relative velocities much smaller than the speed of light, and show the derived equations can be significantly different from those in the homogeneous and isotropic universe model, due to the anisotropic volume expansion in the huge void. We linearize the derived equations of motion and solve them. The solutions show that the behaviors of linear density perturbations are very different from those in the homogeneous and isotropic universe model.
  • We investigate the effect of small scale inhomogeneities on standard candle observations, such as type Ia supernovae (SNe) observations. Existence of the small scale inhomogeneities may cause a tension between SNe observations and other observations with larger diameter sources, such as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) observation. To clarify the impact of the small scale inhomogeneities, we use the Dyer-Roeder approach. We determined the smoothness parameter $\alpha(z)$ as a function of the redshift $z$ so as to compensate the deviation of cosmological parameters for SNe from those for CMB. The range of the deviation which can be compensated by the smoothness parameter $\alpha(z)$ satisfying $0\leq\alpha(z)\leq1$ is reported. Our result suggests that the tension may give us the information of the small scale inhomogeneities through the smoothness parameter.
  • Time evolution of a black hole lattice universe with a positive cosmological constant $\Lambda$ is simulated. The vacuum Einstein equations are numerically solved in a cubic box with a black hole in the center. Periodic boundary conditions on all pairs of opposite faces are imposed. Configurations of marginally trapped surfaces are analyzed. We describe the time evolution of not only black hole horizons, but also cosmological horizons. Defining the effective scale factor by using the area of a surface of the cubic box, we compare it with that in the spatially flat dust dominated FLRW universe with the same value of $\Lambda$. It is found that the behaviour of the effective scale factor is well approximated by that in the FLRW universe. Our result suggests that local inhomogeneities do not significantly affect the global expansion law of the universe irrespective of the value of $\Lambda$.
  • Based on a physical argument, we derive a new analytic formula for the amplitude of density perturbation at the threshold of primordial black hole formation in the universe dominated by a perfect fluid with the equation of state $p=w\rho c^{2}$ for $w\ge 0$. The formula gives $\delta^{\rm UH}_{H c}=\sin^{2}[\pi \sqrt{w}/(1+3w)]$ and $\tilde{\delta}_{c}=[3(1+w)/(5+3w)]\sin^{2}[\pi\sqrt{w}/(1+3w)]$, where $\delta^{\rm UH}_{H c}$ and $\tilde{\delta}_{c}$ are the amplitude of the density perturbation at the horizon crossing time in the uniform Hubble slice and the amplitude measure used in numerical simulations, respectively, while the conventional one gives $\delta^{\rm UH}_{H c}=w$ and $\tilde{\delta}_{c}=3w(1+w)/(5+3w)$. Our formula shows a much better agreement with the result of recent numerical simulations both qualitatively and quantitatively than the conventional formula. For a radiation fluid, our formula gives $\delta^{\rm UH}_{H c}=\sin^{2}(\sqrt{3}\pi/6)\simeq 0.6203$ and $\tilde{\delta}_{c}=(2/3)\sin^{2}(\sqrt{3}\pi/6)\simeq 0.4135$. We also discuss the maximum amplitude and the cosmological implications of the present result.
  • We study the network of Type-I cosmic strings using the field-theoretic numerical simulations in the Abelian-Higgs model. For Type-I strings, the gauge field plays an important role, and thus we find that the correlation length of the strings is strongly dependent upon the parameter \beta, the ratio between the self-coupling constant of the scalar field and the gauge coupling constant, namely, \beta=\lambda/2e^2. In particular, if we take the cosmic expansion into account, the network becomes densest in the comoving box for a specific value of \beta for \beta<1.
  • Time evolution of a black hole lattice universe is simulated. The vacuum Einstein equations in a cubic box with a black hole at the origin are numerically solved with periodic boundary conditions on all pairs of opposite faces. Defining effective scale factors by using the area of a surface and the length of an edge of the cubic box, we compare them with that in the Einstein-deSitter universe. It is found that the behaviour of the effective scale factors is well approximated by that in the Einstein-deSitter universe. Our result suggests that local inhomogeneities do not significantly affect the global expansion law of the universe even if the inhomogeneity is extremely nonlinear.