• In this paper, we focus on numerical solutions for random genetic drift problem, which is governed by a degenerated convection-dominated parabolic equation. Due to the fixation phenomenon of genes, Dirac delta singularities will develop at boundary points as time evolves. Based on an energetic variational approach (EnVarA), a balance between the maximal dissipation principle (MDP) and least action principle (LAP), we obtain the trajectory equation. In turn, a numerical scheme is proposed using a convex splitting technique, with the unique solvability (on a convex set) and the energy decay property (in time) justified at a theoretical level. Numerical examples are presented for cases of pure drift and drift with semi-selection. The remarkable advantage of this method is its ability to catch the Dirac delta singularity close to machine precision over any equidistant grid.
  • This paper considers the reduction of the Langevin equation arising from bio-molecular models. The problem is formulated as a {reduced-order modeling}, and the Krylov subspace projection method is applied to obtain the reduced model. The equivalence to { a} moment-matching procedure is proved. A particular emphasis is placed on the reduction of the stochastic noise. In particular, for order less than six we can show the reduced model obtained from the subspace projection automatically satisfies the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Implementations { details}, including the orthogonalization of the subspaces and the minimization of the matrix multiplications, will be discussed as well.
  • We derive a model describing the evolution of a nematic liquid-crystal material under the action of thermal effects. The first and second laws of thermodynamics lead to an extension of the general Ericksen-Leslie system where the Leslie stress tensor and the Oseen-Frank energy density are considered in their general forms. The work postulate proposed by Ericksen-Leslie is traduced in terms of entropy production. We finally analyze the global-in-time well-posedness of the system for small initial data in the framework of Besov spaces.
  • We consider an extension of the Higgs sector in the standard model (SM) with six Higgs doublets. The gauge couplings are unified without supersymmetry in this model. The lightest of the extra Higgs particles, being stabilized by a discrete symmetry imposed from the outset, presents a plausible candidate for dark matter. For a specific acceptable benchmark point, we show that the model is viable regarding the constraints of relic density, direct detection and invisible Higgs decay. We comment on the mean free path of the dark matter candidate.
  • The action potential signal of nerve and muscle is produced by voltage sensitive channels that include a specialized device to sense voltage. Gating currents of the voltage sensor are now known to depend on the back-and-forth movements of positively charged arginines through the hydrophobic plug of a voltage sensor domain. Transient movements of these permanently charged arginines, caused by the change of transmembrane potential, further drag the S4 segment and induce opening/closing of ion conduction pore by moving the S4-S5 linker. The ion conduction pore is a separate device from the voltage sensor, linked (in an unknown way) by the mechanical motion and electric field changes of the S4-S5 linker. This moving permanent charge induces capacitive current flow everywhere. Everything interacts with everything else in the voltage sensor so everything must interact with everything else in its mathematical model, as everything does in the whole protein. A PNP-steric model of arginines and a mechanical model for the S4 segment are combined using energy variational methods in which all movements of charge and mass satisfy conservation laws of current and mass. The resulting 1D continuum model is used to compute gating currents under a wide range of conditions, corresponding to experimental situations. Chemical-reaction-type models based on ordinary differential equations cannot capture such interactions with one set of parameters. Indeed, they may inadvertently violate conservation of current. Conservation of current is particularly important since small violations (<0.01%) quickly (<< 10-6 seconds) produce forces that destroy molecules. Our model reproduces signature properties of gating current: (1) equality of on and off charge in gating current (2) saturating voltage dependence in QV curve and (3) many (but not all) details of the shape of gating current as a function of voltage.
  • We present the reduction of generalized Langevin equations to a coordinate-only stochastic model, which in its exact form, involves a forcing term with memory and a general Gaussian noise. It will be shown that a similar fluctuation-dissipation theorem still holds at this level. We study the approximation by the typical Brownian dynamics as a first approximation. Our numerical test indicates how the intrinsic frequency of the kernel function influences the accuracy of this approximation. In the case when such an approximate is inadequate, further approximations can be derived by embedding the nonlocal model into an extended dynamics without memory. By imposing noises in the auxiliary variables, we show how the second fluctuation-dissipation theorem is still exactly satisfied.
  • We present a derivation of a coarse-grained model from the Langevin dynamics. The focus is placed on the memory kernel function and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Also presented is an hierarchy of approximations for the memory and random noise terms, using rational approximations in the Laplace domain. These approximations offer increasing accuracy. More importantly, they eliminate the need to evaluate the integral associated with the memory term at each time step.
  • In this paper, we focus on numerical methods for the genetic drift problems, which is governed by a degenerated convection-dominated parabolic equation. Due to the degeneration and convection, Dirac singularities will always be developed at boundary points as time evolves. In order to find a \emph{complete solution} which should keep the conservation of total probability and expectation, three different schemes based on finite volume methods are used to solve the equation numerically: one is a upwind scheme, the other two are different central schemes. We observed that all the methods are stable and can keep the total probability, but have totally different long-time behaviors concerning with the conservation of expectation. We prove that any extra infinitesimal diffusion leads to a same artificial steady state. So upwind scheme does not work due to its intrinsic numerical viscosity. We find one of the central schemes introduces a numerical viscosity term too, which is beyond the common understanding in the convection-diffusion community. Careful analysis is presented to prove that the other central scheme does work. Our study shows that the numerical methods should be carefully chosen and any method with intrinsic numerical viscosity must be avoided.
  • We prove existence of weak solutions to an evolutionary model derived for magnetoelastic materials. The model is phrased in Eulerian coordinates and consists in particular of (i) a Navier-Stokes equation that involves magnetic and elastic terms in the stress tensor obtained by a variational approach, of (ii) a regularized transport equation for the deformation gradient and of (iii) the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the dynamics of the magnetization. The proof is built on a Galerkin method and a fixed-point argument. It is based on ideas from F.-H. Lin and the third author for systems modeling the flow of liquid crystals as well as on methods by G. Carbou and P. Fabrie for solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz equation.
  • The performance of different mutation operators is usually evaluated in conjunc-tion with specific parameter settings of genetic algorithms and target problems. Most studies focus on the classical genetic algorithm with different parameters or on solving unconstrained combinatorial optimization problems such as the traveling salesman problems. In this paper, a subpopulation-based genetic al-gorithm that uses only mutation and selection is developed to solve multi-robot task allocation problems. The target problems are constrained combinatorial optimization problems, and are more complex if cooperative tasks are involved as these introduce additional spatial and temporal constraints. The proposed genetic algorithm can obtain better solutions than classical genetic algorithms with tournament selection and partially mapped crossover. The performance of different mutation operators in solving problems without/with cooperative tasks is evaluated. The results imply that inversion mutation performs better than others when solving problems without cooperative tasks, and the swap-inversion combination performs better than others when solving problems with cooperative tasks.
  • The Poisson Boltzmann equation is known for its success in describing the Debye layer that arises from the charge separation phenomenon at the silica/water interface. However, by treating only the mobile ionic charges in the liquid, the Poisson Boltzmann equation accounts for only half of the electrical double layer, with the other half, the surface charge layer, being beyond its computational domain. In this work, we take a holistic approach to the charge separation phenomenon at the silica/water interface by treating, within a single computational domain, the electrical double layer that comprises both the mobile ions in the liquid and the surface charge density. The Poisson Nernst Planck equations are used as the rigorous basis for our methodology. The holistic approach has the advantage of being able to predict surface charge variations that arise either from the addition of salt and acid to the liquid, or from the decrease of the liquid channel width to below twice the Debye length. As the electrical double layer must be overall neutral, we use this constraint to derive both the form of the static limit of the Poisson Nernst Planck equations, as well as a global chemical potential that replaces the classical zeta potential as the boundary value for the PB equation, which can be re-derived from our formalism. We present several predictions of our theory that are beyond the framework of the PB equation alone, e.g., the surface capacitance and the so-called pK and pL values, the isoelectronic point at which the surface charge layer is neutralized, and the appearance of a Donnan potential that arises from the formation of an electrical double layer at the inlet regions of a nano-channel connected to the bulk reservoir. All theory predictions are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental observations.
  • We propose a formalization for dissipative fluids with interfaces in an inhomogeneous temperature field from the viewpoint of a variational principle. Generally, the Lagrangian of a fluid is given by the kinetic energy density minus the internal energy density. The necessary condition for minimizing an action with subject to the constraint of entropy yields the equation of motion. However, it is sometimes to know the proper equation of entropy. Our main purpose is to obtain it by using the three requirements, which are a generalization of Noether's Theorem, the second law of thermodynamics, and well-posedness. To illustrate this approach, we investigate several phenomena in an inhomogeneous temperature field. In the case of vaporization, diffusion and the rotation of a chiral liquid crystals, we clarify the cross effects between the entropy flux and these phenomena via the internal energy.
  • For multispecies ions, we study boundary layer solutions of charge conserving Poisson-Boltzmann (CCPB) equations [50] (with a small parameter \k{o}) over a finite one-dimensional (1D) spatial domain, subjected to Robin type boundary conditions with variable coefficients. Hereafter, 1D boundary layer solutions mean that as \k{o} approaches zero, the profiles of solutions form boundary layers near boundary points and become flat in the interior domain. These solutions are related to electric double layers with many applications in biology and physics. We rigorously prove the asymptotic behaviors of 1D boundary layer solutions at interior and boundary points. The asymptotic limits of the solution values(electric potentials) at interior and boundary points with a potential gap (related to zeta potential) are uniquely determined by explicit nonlinear formulas (cannot be found in classical Poisson-Boltzmann equations) which are solvable by numerical computations.
  • In this paper, we consider the initial and boundary value problem of a simplified nematic liquid crystal flow in dimension three and construct two examples of finite time singularity. The first example is constructed within the class of axisymmetric solutions, while the second example is constructed for any generic initial data $(u_0,d_0)$ that has sufficiently small energy, and $d_0$ has a nontrivial topology
  • A finite element discretization using a method of lines approached is proposed for approximately solving the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations. This discretization scheme enforces positivity of the computed solutions, corresponding to particle density functions, and a discrete energy estimate is established that resembles the familiar energy law for the PNP system. This energy estimate is extended to finite element solutions to an electrokinetic model, which couples the PNP system with the Navier-Stokes equations. Numerical experiments are conducted to validate convergence of the computed solution and verify the discrete energy estimate.
  • The transport and distribution of charged particles are crucial in the study of many physical and biological problems. In this paper, we employ an Energy Variational Approach to derive the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Navier-Stokes system. All physics is included in the choices of corresponding energy law and kinematic transport of particles. The variational derivations give the coupled force balance equations in a unique and deterministic fashion. We also discuss the situations with different types of boundary conditions. Finally, we show that the Onsager's relation holds for the electrokinetics, near the initial time of a step function applied field.
  • In order to describe the dynamics of crowded ions (charged particles), we use an energetic variation approach to derive a modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) system which includes an extra dissipation due to the effective velocity differences between ion species. Such a system is more complicated than the original PNP system but with the same equilibrium states. Using Schauder's fixed-point theorem, we develop a local existence theorem of classical solutions for the modified PNP system. Different dynamics (but same equilibrium states) between the original and modified PNP systems can be represented by numerical simulations using finite element method techniques.
  • In ionic solutions, there are multi-species charged particles (ions) with different properties like mass, charge etc. Macroscopic continuum models like the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) systems have been extensively used to describe the transport and distribution of ionic species in the solvent. Starting from the kinetic theory for the ion transport, we study a Vlasov-Poisson-Fokker-Planck (VPFP) system in a bounded domain with reflection boundary conditions for charge distributions and prove that the global renormalized solutions of the VPFP system converge to the global weak solutions of the PNP system, as the small parameter related to the scaled thermal velocity and mean free path tends to zero. Our results may justify the PNP system as a macroscopic model for the transport of multi-species ions in dilute solutions.
  • We present a numerical method to compute the approximation of the memory functions in the generalized Langevin models for collective dynamics of macromolecules. We first derive the exact expressions of the memory functions, obtained from projection to subspaces that correspond to the selection of coarse-grain variables. In particular, the memory functions are expressed in the forms of matrix functions, which will then be approximated by Krylov-subspace methods. It will also be demonstrated that the random noise can be approximated under the same framework, and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is automatically satisfied. The accuracy of the method is examined through several numerical examples.
  • A natural model of realizing the effective supersymmetry is presented. Two sets of the Standard Model-like gauge group $G_1\times G_2$ are introduced, where $G_i=SU(3)_i\times SU(2)_i\times U(1)_i$, which break diagonally to the Standard Model gauge group at the energy scale $M \sim 10^7$ GeV. Gauge couplings in $G_1$ are assumed much larger than that in $G_2$. Gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking is adopted. The first two generations (third one) are charged only under $G_1$ ($G_2$). The effective supersymmetry spectrum is obtained. How to reproduce realistic Yukawa couplings is studied. Fine-tuning for an 126 GeV Higgs is much reduced by the large $A$ term due to direct Higgs-messenger interaction. Finally, $G_2$ is found to be a non-trivial realization of the strong unification scenario in which case we can predict $\alpha_s(M_Z)$ without real unification
  • In this paper, we study the formation of finite time singularities in the form of super norm blowup for a spatially inhomogeneous hyperbolic system. The system is related to the variational wave equations as those in [18]. The system posses a unique $C^1$ solution before the emergence of vacuum in finite time, for given initial data that are smooth enough, bounded and uniformly away from vacuum. At the occurrence of blowup, the density becomes zero, while the momentum stays finite, however the velocity and the energy are both infinity.
  • We address several issues regarding the derivation and implementation of the Cauchy-Born approximation of the stress at finite temperature. In particular, an asymptotic expansion is employed to derive a closed form expression for the first Piola-Kirchhoff stress. For systems under periodic boundary conditions, a derivation is presented, which takes into account the translational invariance and clarifies the removal of the zero phonon modes. Also revealed by the asymptotic approach is the role of the smoothness of the interatomic potential. Several numerical examples are provided to validate this approach.
  • Large N_c relations among baryonic Isgur-Wise functions appearing at the order of 1/m_Q are analyzed. An application to \Omega_b \to \Omega_c weak decays is given.
  • WIMP dark matter and gauge coupling unification are considered in an R-parity violating MSSM with vector-like matter. Dark matter is contained in an additional vector-like SU(2)$_L$ doublet which possesses a new U(1) gauge symmetry. The Higgs fields are extended to be in a ${\bf 5\oplus \bar{5}}$ representation of SU(5). The stability of dark matter is a result of gauge symmetries, and the mass of the dark matter particle is between (1.1-1.5) TeV. Dark matter has a very small cross section with nucleis, thus the model is consistent with current dark matter direct detection experiments such as Xenon100. The model also predicts new charged and colored particles to be observed at LHC.
  • Phenomenological analysis to the R-parity violating supersymmetry with a vector-like extra generation is performed in detail. It is found that, via the trilinear couplings, the correct neutrino spectrum can be obtained. The Higgs mass rises to 125 GeV by new up-type Yukawa couplings of vector-like quarks with no need of very heavy superpartners. Phenomena of new heavy fermions at LHC are predicted.