• The global sensitivity analysis of a numerical model aims to quantify, by means of sensitivity indices estimate, the contributions of each uncertain input variable to the model output uncertainty. The so-called Sobol' indices, which are based on the functional variance analysis, present a difficult interpretation in the presence of statistical dependence between inputs. The Shapley effect was recently introduced to overcome this problem as they allocate the mutual contribution (due to correlation and interaction) of a group of inputs to each individual input within the group.In this paper, using several new analytical results, we study the effects of linear correlation between some Gaussian input variables on Shapley effects, and compare these effects to classical first-order and total Sobol' indices.This illustrates the interest, in terms of sensitivity analysis setting and interpretation, of the Shapley effects in the case of dependent inputs. For the practical issue of computationally demanding computer models, we show that the substitution of the original model by a metamodel (here, kriging) makes it possible to estimate these indices with precision at a reasonable computational cost.
  • We propose a gradient-based method for detecting and exploiting low-dimensional input parameter dependence of multivariate functions. The methodology consists in minimizing an upper bound, obtained by Poincar\'e-type inequalities, on the approximation error. The resulting method can be used to approximate vector-valued functions (e.g., functions taking values in $\mathbb{R}^n$ or functions taking values in function spaces) and generalizes the notion of active subspaces associated with scalar-valued functions. A comparison with the truncated Karhunen-Lo\`eve decomposition shows that using gradients of the function can yield more effective dimension reduction. Numerical examples reveal that the choice of norm on the codomain of the function can have a significant impact on the function's low-dimensional approximation.
  • This paper makes the case for using Shapley value to quantify the importance of random input variables to a function. Alternatives based on the ANOVA decomposition can run into conceptual and computational problems when the input variables are dependent. Our main goal here is to show that Shapley value removes the conceptual problems. We do this with some simple examples where Shapley value leads to intuitively reasonable nearly closed form values.
  • This paper is the third part of our study started with Cattiaux, Le\'{o}n and Prieur [Stochastic Process. Appl. 124 (2014) 1236-1260; ALEA Lat. Am. J. Probab. Math. Stat. 11 (2014) 359-384]. For some ergodic Hamiltonian systems, we obtained a central limit theorem for a nonparametric estimator of the invariant density [Stochastic Process. Appl. 124 (2014) 1236-1260] and of the drift term [ALEA Lat. Am. J. Probab. Math. Stat. 11 (2014) 359-384], under partial observation (only the positions are observed). Here, we obtain similarly a central limit theorem for a nonparametric estimator of the diffusion term.
  • The goal of this paper is to solve the global sensitivity analysis for a particular control problem. More precisely, the boundary control problem of an open-water channel is considered, where the boundary conditions are defined by the position of a down stream overflow gate and an upper stream underflow gate. The dynamics of the water depth and of the water velocity are described by the Shallow Water equations, taking into account the bottom and friction slopes. Since some physical parameters are unknown, a stabilizing boundary control is first computed for their nominal values, and then a sensitivity anal-ysis is performed to measure the impact of the uncertainty in the parameters on a given to-be-controlled output. The unknown physical parameters are de-scribed by some probability distribution functions. Numerical simulations are performed to measure the first-order and total sensitivity indices.
  • This paper is dedicated to the study of an estimator of the generalized Hoeffding decomposition. We build such an estimator using an empirical Gram-Schmidt approach and derive a consistency rate in a large dimensional settings. Then, we apply a greedy algorithm with these previous estimators to Sensitivity Analysis. We also establish the consistency of this $\mathbb L_2$-boosting up to sparsity assumptions on the signal to analyse. We end the paper with numerical experiments, which demonstrates the low computational cost of our method as well as its efficiency on standard benchmark of Sensitivity Analysis.
  • We explicitly construct a coupling attaining Ornstein's $\bar{d}$-distance between ordered pairs of binary chains of infinite order. Our main tool is a representation of the transition probabilities of the coupled bivariate chain of infinite order as a countable mixture of Markov transition probabilities of increasing order. Under suitable conditions on the loss of memory of the chains, this representation implies that the coupled chain can be represented as a concatenation of iid sequence of bivariate finite random strings of symbols. The perfect simulation algorithm is based on the fact that we can identify the first regeneration point to the left of the origin almost surely.
  • We propose an estimation procedure for linear functionals based on Gaussian model selection techniques. We show that the procedure is adaptive, and we give a non asymptotic oracle inequality for the risk of the selected estimator with respect to the $\mathbb{L}_p$ loss. An application to the problem of estimating a signal or its $r^{th}$ derivative at a given point is developed and minimax rates are proved to hold uniformly over Besov balls. We also apply our non asymptotic oracle inequality to the estimation of the mean of the signal on an interval with length depending on the noise level. Simulations are included to illustrate the performances of the procedure for the estimation of a function at a given point. Our method provides a pointwise adaptive estimator.