• Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are considered among the best understood samples of galaxies, and they are employed in a broad range of cosmological studies. Because they form a relatively homogeneous population, with high stellar masses and red colors, they are expected to occupy halos in a relatively simple way. In this paper, we study how LRGs occupy massive halos via direct counts in clusters and we reveal several unexpected trends suggesting that the connection between LRGs and dark matter halos may not be straightforward. Using the redMaPPer cluster catalog, we derive the central occupation of LRGs as a function richness, Ncen({\lambda}). Assuming no correlation between cluster mass and central galaxy luminosity at fixed richness, we show that clusters contain a significantly lower fraction of central LRGs than predicted from the two-point correlation function. At halo masses of 10^14.5 Msun, we find Ncen=0.73, compared to Ncen of 0.89 from correlation studies. Our central occupation function for LRGs converges to 0.95 at large halo masses. A strong anti-correlation between central luminosity and cluster mass at fixed richness is required to reconcile our results with those based on clustering studies. We also derive P_BNC, the probability that the brightest cluster member is not the central galaxy. We find P_BNC ~ 20-30% which is a factor of ~2 lower than the value found by Skibba et al. 2011. Finally, we study the radial offsets of bright non-central LRGs from cluster centers and show that bright non-central LRGs follow a different radial distribution compared to red cluster members, which follow a Navarro-Frank-White profile. This work demonstrates that even the most massive clusters do not always have an LRG at the center, and that the brightest galaxy in a cluster is not always the central galaxy.
  • Upcoming weak lensing surveys will survey large cosmological volumes to measure the growth of cosmological structure with time and thereby constrain dark energy. One major systematic uncertainty in this process is the calibration of the weak lensing shape distortions, or shears. Most upcoming surveys plan to test several aspects of their shear estimation algorithms using sophisticated image simulations that include realistic galaxy populations based on high-resolution data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). However, existing datasets from the (HST) cover very small cosmological volumes, so cosmic variance could cause the galaxy populations in them to be atypical. A narrow redshift slice from such surveys could be dominated by a single large overdensity or underdensity. In that case, the morphology-density relation could alter the local galaxy populations and yield an incorrect calibration of shear estimates as a function of redshift. We directly test this scenario using the COSMOS survey, the largest-area (HST) survey to date, and show how the statistical distributions of galaxy shapes and morphological parameters (e.g., S\'{e}rsic $n$) are influenced by redshift-dependent cosmic variance. The typical variation in RMS ellipticity due to environmental effects is 5 per cent (absolute, not relative) for redshift bins of width $\Delta z=0.05$, which could result in uncertain shear calibration at the 1 per cent level. We conclude that the cosmic variance effects are large enough to exceed the systematic error budget of future surveys, but can be mitigated with careful choice of training dataset and sufficiently large redshift binning.
  • Central Galaxies (CGs) in massive halos live in unique environments with formation histories closely linked to that of the host halo. In local clusters they have larger sizes ($R_e$) and lower velocity dispersions (sigma) at fixed stellar mass M_star, and much larger R_e at a fixed $\sigma$ than field and satellite galaxies (non-CGs). Using spectroscopic observations of group galaxies selected from the COSMOS survey, we compare the dynamical scaling relations of early-type CGs and non-CGs at z~0.6, to distinguish possible mechanisms that produce the required evolution. CGs are systematically offset towards larger R_e at fixed $\sigma$ compared to non-CGs with similar M_star. The CG R_e-M_star relation also shows differences, primarily driven by a sub-population (~15%) of galaxies with large $R_e$, while the M_star-sigma relations are indistinguishable. These results are accentuated when double Sersic profiles, which better fit light in the outer regions of galaxies, are adopted. They suggest that even group-scale CGs can develop extended components by these redshifts that can increase total $R_e$ and M_star estimates by factors of ~2. To probe the evolutionary link between our sample and cluster CGs, we also analyze two cluster samples at z~0.6 and z~0. We find similar results for the more massive halos at comparable z, but much more distinct CG scaling relations at low-z. Thus, the rapid, late-time accretion of outer components, perhaps via the stripping and accretion of satellites, would appear to be a key feature that distinguishes the evolutionary history of CGs.
  • The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 3 (GREAT3) challenge is the third in a series of image analysis challenges, with a goal of testing and facilitating the development of methods for analyzing astronomical images that will be used to measure weak gravitational lensing. This measurement requires extremely precise estimation of very small galaxy shape distortions, in the presence of far larger intrinsic galaxy shapes and distortions due to the blurring kernel caused by the atmosphere, telescope optics, and instrumental effects. The GREAT3 challenge is posed to the astronomy, machine learning, and statistics communities, and includes tests of three specific effects that are of immediate relevance to upcoming weak lensing surveys, two of which have never been tested in a community challenge before. These effects include realistically complex galaxy models based on high-resolution imaging from space; spatially varying, physically-motivated blurring kernel; and combination of multiple different exposures. To facilitate entry by people new to the field, and for use as a diagnostic tool, the simulation software for the challenge is publicly available, though the exact parameters used for the challenge are blinded. Sample scripts to analyze the challenge data using existing methods will also be provided. See http://great3challenge.info and http://great3.projects.phys.ucl.ac.uk/leaderboard/ for more information.
  • Tidal dissipation may be important for the internal evolution as well as the orbits of short-period massive planets--hot Jupiters. We revisit a mechanism proposed by Ogilvie and Lin for tidal forcing of inertial waves, which are short-wavelength, low-frequency disturbances restored primarily by Coriolis rather than buoyancy forces. This mechanism is of particular interest for hot Jupiters because it relies upon a rocky core, and because these bodies are otherwise largely convective. Compared to waves excited at the base of the stratified, externally heated atmosphere, waves excited at the core are more likely to deposit heat in the convective region and thereby affect the planetary radius. However, Ogilvie and Lin's results were numerical, and the manner of the wave excitation was not clear. Using WKB methods, we demonstrate the production of short waves by scattering of the equilibrium tide off the core at critical latitudes. The tidal dissipation rate associated with these waves scales as the fifth power of the core radius, and the implied tidal $Q$ is of order ten million for nominal values of the planet's mass, radius, orbital period, and core size. We comment upon an alternative proposal by Wu for exciting inertial waves in an unstratified fluid body by means of compressibility rather than a core. We also find that even a core of rock is unlikely to be rigid. But Ogilvie and Lin's mechanism should still operate if the core is substantially denser than its immediate surroundings.