• The SPIRou near infrared spectro-polarimeter is destined to begin science operations at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in mid-2018. One of the instrument's primary science goals is to discover the closest exoplanets to the Solar System by conducting a 3-5 year long radial velocity survey of nearby M dwarfs at an expected precision of $\sim 1$ m s$^{-1}$; the SPIRou Legacy Survey-Planet Search (SLS-PS). In this study we conduct a detailed Monte-Carlo simulation of the SLS-PS using our current understanding of the occurrence rate of M dwarf planetary systems and physical models of stellar activity. From simultaneous modelling of planetary signals and activity, we predict the population of planets detected in the SLS-PS. With our fiducial survey strategy and expected instrument performance over a nominal survey length of $\sim 3$ years, we expect SPIRou to detect $85.3^{+29.3}_{-12.4}$ planets including $20.0^{+16.8}_{-7.2}$ habitable zone planets and $8.1^{+7.6}_{-3.2}$ Earth-like planets from a sample of 100 M1-M8.5 dwarfs out to 11 pc. By studying mid-to-late M dwarfs previously inaccessible to existing optical velocimeters, SPIRou will put meaningful constraints on the occurrence rate of planets around those stars including the value of $\eta_{\oplus}$ at an expected level of precision of $\lesssim 45$%. We also predict a subset of $46.7^{+16.0}_{-6.0}$ planets may be accessible with dedicated high-contrast imagers on the next generation of ELTs including $4.9^{+4.7}_{-2.0}$ potentially imagable Earth-like planets. Lastly, we compare the results of our fiducial survey strategy to other foreseeable survey versions to quantify which strategy is optimized to reach the SLS-PS science goals. The results of our simulations are made available to the community on github.
  • Present and future high-precision radial-velocity spectrometers dedicated to the discovery of low-mass planets orbiting low-mass dwarfs need to focus on the best selected stars to make an efficient use of telescope time. In the framework of the preparation of the SPIRou Input Catalog, the CoolSnap program aims at screening M dwarfs in the solar neighborhood against binarity, rapid rotation, activity, ... To optimize the selection, the present paper describes the methods used to compute effective temperature, metallicity, projected rotation velocity of a large sample of 440 M dwarfs observed in the visible with the high-resolution spectro-polarimeter ESPaDOnS at CFHT. It also summarizes known and newly-discovered spectroscopic binaries, and stars known to belong to visual multiple systems. A calibration of the projected rotation velocity versus measured line widths for M dwarfs observed by the ESPaDOnS spectro-polarimeter is derived, and the resulting values are compared to equatorial rotation velocities deduced from rotation periods and radii. A comparison of the derived effective temperatures and metallicities with literature values is also conducted. Finally, the radial velocity uncertainty of each star in the sample is estimated, to narrow down the selection of stars to be included into the SPIRou Input Catalogue (SPIC).
  • We present new radial velocity measurements for three low-metallicity solar-like stars observed with the SOPHIE spectrograph and its predecessor ELODIE, both installed at the 193 cm telescope of the Haute-Provence Observatory, allowing the detection and characterization of three new giant extrasolar planets in intermediate periods of 1.7 to 3.7 years. All three stars, HD17674, HD42012 and HD29021 present single giant planetary companions with minimum masses between 0.9 and 2.5 MJup. The range of periods and masses of these companions, along with the distance of their host stars, make them good targets to look for astrometric signals over the lifetime of the new astrometry satellite Gaia. We discuss the preliminary astrometric solutions obtained from the first Gaia data release.
  • We report the discovery of variable radio emission associated with the T Tauri star, V830 Tau, which was recently shown to host a hot Jupiter companion. Very Large Array observations at a frequency of 6 GHz reveal a detection on 01 May 2011 with a flux density $919 \pm 26\ \mu$Jy, along with non-detections in two other epochs at $<66$ and $<150\ \mu$Jy. Additionally, Very Long Baseline Array observations include one detection and one non-detection at comparable sensitivity, demonstrating that the emission is nonthermal in origin. The emission is consistent with the gyro-synchrotron or synchrotron mechanism from a region with a magnetic field ${\stackrel{\scriptstyle >}{\scriptstyle \sim}} 30$ G, and is likely driven by an energetic event such as magnetic reconnection that accelerated electrons. With the limited data we have, we are not able to place any constraint on the relationship between the radio emission and the rotational or orbital properties of V830 Tau. This is the first detection of radio emission from a non-degenerate star known to host an exoplanet.
  • Kepler-78 is host to a transiting 8.5-hour orbit super-Earth. In this paper, the rotation and magnetic properties of the planet host star are studied. We first revisit the Kepler photometric data for a detailed description of the rotation properties of Kepler-78, showing that the star seems to undergo a cycle in the spot pattern of ~1,300 day duration. We then use spectropolarimetric observations with CFHT/ESPaDOnS to measure the circular polarization in the line profile of the star during its rotation cycle, as well as spectroscopic proxies of the chromospheric activity. The average field has an amplitude of 16 G. The magnetic topology is characterized by a poloidal and a toroidal component, encompassing 60% and 40% of the magnetic energy, respectively. Differential rotation is detected with an estimated rate of 0.105+-0.039 rad/d. Activity tracers vary with the rotation cycle of the star; there is no hint that a residual activity level is related to the planetary orbit at the precision of our data. The description of the star magnetic field's characteristics then may serve as input for models of interactions between the star and its close-by planet, e.g., Ohmic dissipation and unipolar induction.
  • The detection and characterization of exoplanets have made huge progresses since the first discoveries in the late nineties. In particular, the independent measurement of the mass and radius of planets, by combining the transit and radial-velociy techniques, allowed exploring their density and hence, their internal structure. With CoRoT (2007-2012), the pioneering CNES space-based mission in this investigation, about thirty new planets were characterized. CoRoT has enhanced the diversity of giant exoplanets and discovered the first telluric exoplanet. Following CoRoT, the NASA Kepler mission has extended our knowledge to small-size planets, multiple systems and planets orbiting binaries. Exploring these new worlds will continue with the NASA/TESS (2017) and ESA/PLATO (2024) missions.
  • We present the detection and characterization of the transiting warm Jupiter KOI-12b, first identified with Kepler with an orbital period of 17.86 days. We combine the analysis of Kepler photometry with Doppler spectroscopy and line-profile tomography of time-series spectra obtained with the SOPHIE spectrograph to establish its planetary nature and derive its properties. To derive reliable estimates for the uncertainties on the tomographic model parameters, we devised an empirical method to calculate statistically independent error bars on the time-series spectra. KOI-12b has a radius of 1.43$\pm$0.13$ R_\mathrm{Jup}$ and a 3$\sigma$ upper mass limit of 10$M_\mathrm{Jup}$. It orbits a fast-rotating star ($v$sin$i_{\star}$ = 60.0$\pm$0.9 km s$^{-1}$) with mass and radius of 1.45$\pm$0.09 $M_\mathrm{Sun}$ and 1.63$\pm$0.15 $R_\mathrm{Sun}$, located at 426$\pm$40 pc from the Earth. Doppler tomography allowed a higher precision on the obliquity to be reached by comparison with the analysis of the Rossiter-McLaughlin radial velocity anomaly, and we found that KOI-12b lies on a prograde, slightly misaligned orbit with a low sky-projected obliquity $\lambda$ = 12.6$\stackrel{+3.0}{_{-2.9}}^\circ$. The properties of this planetary system, with a 11.4 magnitude host-star, make of KOI-12b a precious target for future atmospheric characterization.
  • The braking of main sequence stars originates mainly from their stellar wind. The efficiency of this angular momentum extraction depends on the rotation rate of the star, the acceleration profile of the wind and the coronal magnetic field. The derivation of scaling laws parametrizing the stellar wind torque is important for our understanding of gyro-chronology and the evolution of the rotation rates of stars. In order to understand the impact of complex magnetic topologies on the stellar wind torque, we present three- dimensional, dynamical simulations of the corona of HD 189733. Using the observed complex topology of the magnetic field, we estimate how the torque associated with the wind scales with model parameters and compare those trends to previously published scaling laws.
  • We present detections of the near-infrared thermal emission of three hot Jupiters and one brown-dwarf using the Wide-field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). These include Ks-band secondary eclipse detections of the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and Qatar-1b and the brown dwarf KELT-1b. We also report Y-band, $K_{CONT}$-band, and two new and one reanalyzed Ks-band detections of the thermal emission of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b. We present a new reduction pipeline for CFHT/WIRCam data, which is optimized for high precision photometry. We also describe novel techniques for constraining systematic errors in ground-based near-infrared photometry, so as to return reliable secondary eclipse depths and uncertainties. We discuss the noise properties of our ground-based photometry for wavelengths spanning the near-infrared (the YJHK-bands), for faint and bright-stars, and for the same object on several occasions. For the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and WASP-12b we demonstrate the repeatability of our eclipse depth measurements in the Ks-band; we therefore place stringent limits on the systematics of ground-based, near-infrared photometry, and also rule out violent weather changes in the deep, high pressure atmospheres of these two hot Jupiters at the epochs of our observations.
  • The Gemini Remote Access to CFHT ESPaDONS Spectrograph has achieved first light of its experimental phase in May 2014. It successfully collected light from the Gemini North telescope and sent it through two 270 m optical fibers to the the ESPaDOnS spectrograph at CFHT to deliver high-resolution spectroscopy across the optical region. The fibers gave an average focal ratio degradation of 14% on sky, and a maximum transmittance of 85% at 800nm. GRACES achieved delivering spectra with a resolution power of R = 40,000 and R = 66,000 between 400 and 1,000 nm. It has a ~8% throughput and is sensitive to target fainter than 21st mag in 1 hour. The average acquisition time of a target is around 10 min. This project is a great example of a productive collaboration between two observatories on Maunakea that was successful due to the reciprocal involvement of the Gemini, CFHT, and NRC Herzberg teams, and all the staff involved closely or indirectly.
  • Optical velocimetry has led to the detection of more than 500 planets to date and there is a strong effort to push m/s velocimetry to the near-infrared to access cooler and lighter stars. The presence of numerous telluric absorption lines in the nIR brings an important challenge. As the star's barycentric velocity varies through the year, the telluric absorption lines effectively varies in velocity relative to the star's spectrum by the same amount leading to important systematic RV offsets. We present a novel principal component analysis-based approach for telluric line subtraction and demonstrated its effectiveness with archival HARPS data for GJ436 and {\tau} Ceti, over parts of the R-band that contain strong telluric absorption lines. The main results are: 1) a better RV accuracy with excluding only a few percentage of the domain, 2) better use of the entire spectrum to measure RV and 3) a higher telescope time efficency by using A0V telluric standard from telescope archive.
  • SPIRou is a near-IR \'echelle spectropolarimeter and high-precision velocimeter under construction as a next-generation instrument for the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope. It is designed to cover a very wide simultaneous near-IR spectral range (0.98-2.35 {\mu}m) at a resolving power of 73.5K, providing unpolarized and polarized spectra of low-mass stars at a radial velocity (RV) precision of 1m/s. The main science goals of SPIRou are the detection of habitable super-Earths around low-mass stars and the study of how critically magnetic fields impact star / planet formation. Following a successful final design review in Spring 2014, SPIRou is now under construction and is scheduled to see first light in late 2017. We present an overview of key aspects of SPIRou's optical and mechanical design.
  • The atmospheric composition of transiting exoplanets can be characterized during transit by spectroscopy. For the transit of an Earth twin, models predict that biogenic $O_2$ and $O_3$ should be detectable, as well as water vapour, a molecule linked to habitability as we know it on Earth. The aim is to measure the Earth radius versus wavelength $\lambda$ - or the atmosphere thickness $h(\lambda)$ - at the highest spectral resolution available to fully characterize the signature of Earth seen as a transiting exoplanet. We present observations of the Moon eclipse of 21-12-2010. Seen from the Moon, the Earth eclipses the Sun and opens access to the Earth atmosphere transmission spectrum. We used HARPS and UVES spectrographs to take penumbra and umbra high-resolution spectra from 3100 to 10400 Ang. A change of the quantity of water vapour above the telescope compromised the quality of the UVES data. We corrected for this effect in the data processing. We analyzed the data by 3 different methods. The 1st method is based on the analysis of pairs of penumbra spectra. The 2nd makes use of a single penumbra spectrum, and the 3rd of all penumbra and umbra spectra. Profiles $h(\lambda)$ are obtained with the three methods for both instruments. The 1st method gives the best result, in agreement with a model. The second method seems to be more sensitive to the Doppler shift of solar spectral lines with respect to the telluric lines. The 3rd method makes use of umbra spectra which bias the result, but it can be corrected for this a posteriori from results with the first method. The 3 methods clearly show the spectral signature of the Rayleigh scattering in the Earth atmosphere and the bands of H$_2$O, O$_2$, and O$_3$. Sodium is detected. Assuming no atmospheric perturbations, we show that the E-ELT is theoretically able to detect the $O_2$ A-band in 8~h of integration for an Earth twin at 10pc.
  • Geoffrey W. Marcy, Howard Isaacson, Andrew W. Howard, Jason F. Rowe, Jon M. Jenkins, Stephen T. Bryson, David W. Latham, Steve B. Howell, Thomas N. Gautier III, Natalie M. Batalha, Leslie A. Rogers, David Ciardi, Debra A. Fischer, Ronald L. Gilliland, Hans Kjeldsen, Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard, Daniel Huber, William J. Chaplin, Sarbani Basu, Lars A. Buchhave, Samuel N. Quinn, William J. Borucki, David G. Koch, Roger Hunter, Douglas A. Caldwell, Jeffrey Van Cleve, Rea Kolbl, Lauren M. Weiss, Erik Petigura, Sara Seager, Timothy Morton, John Asher Johnson, Sarah Ballard, Chris Burke, William D. Cochran, Michael Endl, Phillip MacQueen, Mark E. Everett, Jack J. Lissauer, Eric B. Ford, Guillermo Torres, Francois Fressin, Timothy M. Brown, Jason H. Steffen, David Charbonneau, Gibor S. Basri, Dimitar D. Sasselov, Joshua Winn, Roberto Sanchis-Ojeda, Jessie Christiansen, Elisabeth Adams, Christopher Henze, Andrea Dupree, Daniel C. Fabrycky, Jonathan J. Fortney, Jill Tarter, Matthew J. Holman, Peter Tenenbaum, Avi Shporer, Philip W. Lucas, William F. Welsh, Jerome A. Orosz, T. R. Bedding, T. L. Campante, G. R. Davies, Y. Elsworth, R. Handberg, S. Hekker, C. Karoff, S. D. Kawaler, M. N. Lund, M. Lundkvist, T. S. Metcalfe, A. Miglio, V. Silva Aguirre, D. Stello, T. R. White, Alan Boss, Edna Devore, Alan Gould, Andrej Prsa, Eric Agol, Thomas Barclay, Jeff Coughlin, Erik Brugamyer, Fergal Mullally, Elisa V. Quintana, Martin Still, Susan E. hompson, David Morrison, Joseph D. Twicken, Jean-Michel Désert, Josh Carter, Justin R. Crepp, Guillaume Hébrard, Alexandre Santerne, Claire Moutou, Charlie Sobeck, Douglas Hudgins, Michael R. Haas, Paul Robertson, Jorge Lillo-Box, David Barrado
    Jan. 16, 2014 astro-ph.EP
    We report on the masses, sizes, and orbits of the planets orbiting 22 Kepler stars. There are 49 planet candidates around these stars, including 42 detected through transits and 7 revealed by precise Doppler measurements of the host stars. Based on an analysis of the Kepler brightness measurements, along with high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, Doppler spectroscopy, and (for 11 stars) asteroseismology, we establish low false-positive probabilities for all of the transiting planets (41 of 42 have a false-positive probability under 1%), and we constrain their sizes and masses. Most of the transiting planets are smaller than 3X the size of Earth. For 16 planets, the Doppler signal was securely detected, providing a direct measurement of the planet's mass. For the other 26 planets we provide either marginal mass measurements or upper limits to their masses and densities; in many cases we can rule out a rocky composition. We identify 6 planets with densities above 5 g/cc, suggesting a mostly rocky interior for them. Indeed, the only planets that are compatible with a purely rocky composition are smaller than ~2 R_earth. Larger planets evidently contain a larger fraction of low-density material (H, He, and H2O).
  • Using spectropolarimetry, we investigate the large-scale magnetic topologies of stars hosting close-in exoplanets. A small survey of ten stars has been done with the twin instruments TBL/NARVAL and CFHT/ESPaDOnS between 2006 and 2011. Each target consists of circular-polarization observations covering 7 to 22 days. For each of the 7 targets in which a magnetic field was detected, we reconstructed the magnetic field topology using Zeeman-Doppler imaging. Otherwise, a detection limit has been estimated. Three new epochs of observations of Tau Boo are presented, which confirm magnetic polarity reversal. We estimate that the cycle period is 2 years, but recall that a shorter period of 240 days can not still be ruled out. The result of our survey is compared to the global picture of stellar magnetic field properties in the mass-rotation diagram. The comparison shows that these giant planet-host stars tend to have similar magnetic field topologies to stars without detected hot-Jupiters. This needs to be confirmed with a larger sample of stars.
  • Until now, just a few extrasolar planets (~30 out of 860) have been found through the direct imaging method. This number should greatly improve when the next generation of High Contrast Instruments like Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) at Gemini South Telescope or SPHERE at VLT will became operative at the end of this year. In particular, the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS), one of the SPHERE subsystems, should allow a first characterization of the spectral type of the found extrasolar planets. Here we present the results of the last performance tests that we have done on the IFS instrument at the Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) in condition as similar as possible to the ones that we will find at the telescope. We have found that we should be able to reach contrast down to 5x10$^{-7}$ and make astrometry at sub-mas level with the instrument in the actual conditions. A number of critical issues have been identified. The resolution of these problems could allow to further improve the performance of the instrument.
  • One of the objectives of the CoRoT mission is the search for transiting extrasolar planets using high-precision photometry, and the accurate characterization of their fundamental parameters. The CoRoT satellite consecutively observes crowded stellar fields since February 2007, in high-cadence precise photometry; periodic eclipses are detected and analysed in the stellar light curves. Then complementary observations using ground-based facilities allows establishing the nature of the transiting body and its mass. CoRoT has acquired more than 163,000 light curves and detected about 500 planet candidates. A fraction of them (5%) are confirmed planets whose masses are independently measured. Main highlights of the CoRoT discoveries are: i) the variety of internal structures in close-in giant planets, ii) the characterisation of the first known transiting rocky planet, CoRoT-7 b, iii) multiple constraints on the formation, evolution, role of tides in planetary systems.
  • We report the discovery of a transiting brown dwarf companion to KOI-205, a K0 main-sequence star, in a 11.720125-day period orbit. The transits were detected by the Kepler space telescope, and the reflex motion of the star was measured using radial velocity observations obtained with the SOPHIE spectrograph. The atmospheric parameters of the host stars were determined from the analysis of high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio ESPaDOns spectra obtained for this purpose. Together with spectrophotometric measurements recovered from the literature, these spectra indicate that the star is a mildly metallic K0 dwarf with Teff 5237 $\pm$ 60 K. The mass of the companion is 39.9 $\pm$ 1.0 MJup and its radius is 0.81 $\pm$ 0.02 RJup, in agreement with current theoretical predictions. This is the first time a bona fide brown dwarf companion is detected in orbit around a star of this type. The formation and orbital evolution of brown dwarf companions is briefly discussed in the light of this new discovery.
  • The naked-eye star 55 Cancri hosts a planetary system with five known planets, including a hot super-Earth (55 Cnc e) extremely close to its star and a farther out giant planet (55 Cnc b), found in milder irradiation conditions with respect to other known hot Jupiters. This system raises important questions on the evolution of atmospheres for close-in exoplanets, and the dependence with planetary mass and irradiation. These questions can be addressed by Lyman-alpha transit observations of the extended hydrogen planetary atmospheres, complemented by contemporaneous measurements of the stellar X-ray flux. In fact, planet `e' has been detected in transit, suggesting the system is seen nearly edge-on. Yet, planet `b' has not been observed in transit so far. Here, we report on Hubble Space Telescope STIS Lyman-alpha and Chandra ACIS-S X-ray observations of 55 Cnc. These simultaneous observations cover two transits of 55 Cnc e and two inferior conjunctions of 55 Cnc b. They reveal the star as a bright Lyman-alpha target and a variable X-ray source. While no significant signal is detected during the transits of 55 Cnc e, we detect a surprising Lyman-alpha absorption of 7.5 +/- 1.8% (4.2 sigma) at inferior conjunctions of 55 Cnc b. The absorption is only detected over the range of Doppler velocities where the stellar radiation repels hydrogen atoms towards the observer. We calculate a false-alarm probability of 4.4%, which takes into account the a-priori unknown transit parameters. This result suggests the possibility that 55 Cnc b has an extended upper H I atmosphere, which undergoes partial transits when the planet grazes the stellar disc. If confirmed, it would show that planets cooler than hot Jupiters can also have extended atmospheres.
  • [Abridged] Context. The CoRoT space mission has been searching for transiting planets since the end of December 2006. Aims. We aim to investigate the capability of CoRoT to detect small-size transiting planets in short-period orbits, and to compare the number of CoRoT planets with 2 \leq R_p \leq 4 Rearth with the occurrence rate of small-size planets provided by the distribution of Kepler planetary candidates (Howard et al. 2012). Methods. We performed a test that simulates transits of super-Earths and Neptunes in real CoRoT light curves and searches for them blindly by using the LAM transit detection pipeline. Results. The CoRoT detection rate of planets with radius between 2 and 4 Rearth and orbital period P \leq 20 days is 59% (31%) around stars brighter than r'=14.0 (15.5). By properly taking the CoRoT detection rate for Neptune-size planets and the transit probability into account, we found that according to the Kepler planet occurrence rate, CoRoT should have discovered 12 \pm 2 Neptunes orbiting G and K dwarfs with P \leq 17 days in six observational runs. This estimate must be compared with the validated Neptune CoRoT-24b and five CoRoT planetary candidates in the considered range of planetary radii. We thus found a disagreement with expectations from Kepler at 3 \sigma or 5 \sigma, assuming a blend fraction of 0% (six Neptunes) and 100% (one Neptune) for these candidates. Conclusions. This underabundance of CoRoT Neptunes with respect to Kepler may be due to several reasons. Regardless of the origin of the disagreement, which needs to be investigated in more detail, the noticeable deficiency of CoRoT Neptunes at short orbital periods seems to indirectly support the general trend found in Kepler data, i.e. that the frequency of small-size planets increases with increasing orbital periods and decreasing planet radii.
  • Spectral characterization of sub-stellar companions is essential to understand their composition and formation processes. However, the large contrast ratio of the brightness of each object to that of its parent star limits our ability to extract a clean spectrum, free from any significant contribution from the star. During the development of the long slit spectroscopy (LSS) mode of IRDIS, the dual-band imager and spectrograph of SPHERE, we proposed a data analysis method to estimate and remove the contributions of the stellar spectrum. This method has never been tested on real data because of the lack of instrumentation capable of combining adaptive optics (AO), coronagraphy, and LSS. Nonetheless, a similar attenuation of the star can be obtained using a particular observing configuration. Test data were acquired using the AO-assisted spectrograph VLT/NACO. We obtained new J- and H-band spectra of SCR J1845-6357 B, a T6 companion to a nearby (3.85\pm0.02 pc) M8 star. This system is a well-suited benchmark as it is relatively wide (~1.0") with a modest contrast ratio (~4 mag), and a previously published JHK spectrum is available for reference. We demonstrate that (1) our method is efficient at estimating and removing the stellar contribution, (2) it allows to properly recover the spectral shape of the companion, and (3) it is essential to obtain an unbiased estimation of physical parameters. We also show that the slit configuration associated with this method allows us to use long exposure times with high throughput producing high signal-to-noise ratio data. However, the signal of the companion gets over-subtracted, particularly in our J-band data, compelling us to use a fake companion spectrum to estimate and compensate for the loss of flux. Finally, we report a new astrometric measurement of the position of the companion (sep = 0.817", PA = 227.92 deg).
  • We report the measurement of the spin-orbit angle of the extra-solar planets HAT-P-8 b, HAT-P-9 b, HAT-P-16 b and HAT-P-23 b, thanks to spectroscopic observations performed at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope. Radial velocity measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect show the detection of an apparent prograde, aligned orbit for all systems. The projected spin-orbit angles are found to be lambda=-17 deg (+9.2,-11.5), -16 deg (8), -10 deg (16), +15 deg (22) for HAT-P-8, HAT-P-9, HAT-P-16 and HAT-P-23 respectively, with corresponding projected rotational velocities of 14.5 (0.8), 12.5 (1.8), 3.9 (0.8), and 7.8 (1.6) km/s. These new results increase to 37 the number of accurately measured spin-orbit angles in transiting extrasolar systems. We conclude by drawing a tentative picture of the global behaviour of orbital alignement, involving the complexity and diversity of possible mechanisms.
  • The Kepler mission has detected transits and occultations of a hot compact object around an early-type star, the Kepler Object of Interest KOI 74. The mass of this transiting object was photometrically assessed in a previous study using the presence of the relativistic beaming effect (so-called `Doppler boosting') in the light curve. Our aim was to provide a spectroscopic validation of this pioneering approach. We measured the radial velocity variations of the A1V star KOI 74 with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93-m telescope of the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (France). Radial velocity measurements of this star are challenging because of the high level of stellar pulsations and the few available spectral lines. Using a technique dedicated to early-type main-sequence stars, we measured radial velocity variations compatible with a companion of mass 0.252+/-0.025 Msun, in good agreement with the value derived from the Kepler light curve. This work strengthens the scenario suggesting that KOI 74 is a blue straggler orbited by a stellar core despoiled of its envelope, the low-mass white dwarf KOI 74b.
  • In this paper, we present our HARPS radial-velocity data for eight low-activity solar-type stars belonging to the HARPS volume-limited sample: HD6718, HD8535, HD28254, HD290327, HD43197, HD44219, HD148156, and HD156411. Keplerian fits to these data reveal the presence of low-mass companions around these targets. With minimum masses ranging from 0.58 to 2.54 MJup, these companions are in the planetary mass domain. The orbital periods of these planets range from slightly less than one to almost seven years. The eight orbits presented in this paper exhibit a wide variety of eccentricities: from 0.08 to above 0.8.
  • An important goal within the quest for detecting an Earth-like extrasolar planet, will be to identify atmospheric gaseous bio-signatures. Observations of the light transmitted through the Earth's atmosphere, as for an extrasolar planet, will be the first step for future comparisons. We have completed observations of the Earth during a Lunar eclipse, a unique situation similar to that of a transiting planet. We aim at showing what species could be detected in its atmosphere at optical wavelengths, where a lot of photons are available in the masked stellar light. We present observations of the 2008 August 16 Moon eclipse performed with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. Locating the spectrograph fibers in the penumbra of the eclipse, the Moon irradiance is then a mix of direct, unabsorbed Sun light and solar light that has passed through the Earth's limb. This mixture essentially reproduces what is recorded during the transit of an extrasolar planet. We report here the clear detection of several Earth atmospheric compounds in the transmission spectra, such as ozone, molecular oxygen, and neutral sodium as well as molecular nitrogen and oxygen through the Rayleigh signature. Moreover, we present a method that allows us to derive the thickness of the atmosphere versus the wavelength for penumbra eclipse observations. We quantitatively evaluate the altitude at which the atmosphere becomes transparent for important species like molecular oxygen and ozone, two species thought to be tightly linked to the presence of life. The molecular detections presented here are an encouraging first attempt, necessary to better prepare for the future of extremely-large telescopes and transiting Earth-like planets. Instruments like SOPHIE will be mandatory when characterizing the atmospheres of transiting Earth-like planets from the ground and searching for bio-marker signatures.