• In this paper, a new algorithm for extracting features from sequences of multidimensional observations is presented. The independently developed Dynamic Mode Decomposition and Matrix Pencil methods provide a least-squares model-based approach for estimating complex frequencies present in signals as well as their corresponding amplitudes. Unlike other feature extraction methods such as Fourier Transform or Autoregression which have to be computed for each sequence individually, the least-squares approach considers the whole dataset at once. It invokes order reduction methods to extract a small number of features best describing all given data, and indicate which frequencies correspond to which sequences. As an illustrative example, the new method is applied to regions of different grain orientation in a Transmission Electron Microscopy image.
  • Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) gives a practical means of extracting dynamic information from data, in the form of spatial modes and their associated frequencies and growth/decay rates. DMD can be considered as a numerical approximation to the Koopman operator, an infinite-dimensional linear operator defined for (nonlinear) dynamical systems. This work proposes a new criterion to estimate the accuracy of DMD on a mode-by-mode basis, by estimating how closely each individual DMD eigenfunction approximates the corresponding Koopman eigenfunction. This approach does not require any prior knowledge of the system dynamics or the true Koopman spectral decomposition. The method may be applied to extensions of DMD (i.e., extended/kernel DMD), which are applicable to a wider range of problems. The accuracy criterion is first validated against the true error with a synthetic system for which the true Koopman spectral decomposition is known. We next demonstrate how this proposed accuracy criterion can be used to assess the performance of various choices of kernel when using the kernel method for extended DMD. Finally, we show that our proposed method successfully identifies modes of high accuracy when applying DMD to data from experiments in fluids, in particular particle image velocimetry of a cylinder wake and a canonical separated boundary layer.
  • Simple aerodynamic configurations under even modest conditions can exhibit complex flows with a wide range of temporal and spatial features. It has become common practice in the analysis of these flows to look for and extract physically important features, or modes, as a first step in the analysis. This step typically starts with a modal decomposition of an experimental or numerical dataset of the flow field, or of an operator relevant to the system. We describe herein some of the dominant techniques for accomplishing these modal decompositions and analyses that have seen a surge of activity in recent decades. For a non-expert, keeping track of recent developments can be daunting, and the intent of this document is to provide an introduction to modal analysis that is accessible to the larger fluid dynamics community. In particular, we present a brief overview of several of the well-established techniques and clearly lay the framework of these methods using familiar linear algebra. The modal analysis techniques covered in this paper include the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), balanced proper orthogonal decomposition (Balanced POD), dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), Koopman analysis, global linear stability analysis, and resolvent analysis.
  • Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is a popular technique for modal decomposition, flow analysis, and reduced-order modeling. In situations where a system is time varying, one would like to update the system's description online as time evolves. This work provides an efficient method for computing DMD in real time, updating the approximation of a system's dynamics as new data becomes available. The algorithm does not require storage of past data, and computes the exact DMD matrix using rank-1 updates. A weighting factor that places less weight on older data can be incorporated in a straightforward manner, making the method particularly well suited to time-varying systems. A variant of the method may also be applied to online computation of "windowed DMD", in which only the most recent data are used. The efficiency of the method is compared against several existing DMD algorithms: for problems in which the state dimension is less than about~200, the proposed algorithm is the most efficient for real-time computation, and it can be orders of magnitude more efficient than the standard DMD algorithm. The method is demonstrated on several examples, including a time-varying linear system and a more complex example using data from a wind tunnel experiment. In particular, we show that the method is effective at capturing the dynamics of surface pressure measurements in the flow over a flat plate with an unsteady separation bubble.
  • Scaling laws for the propulsive performance of rigid foils undergoing oscillatory heaving and pitching motions are presented. Water tunnel experiments on a nominally two-dimensional flow validate the scaling laws, with the scaled data for thrust, power, and efficiency all showing excellent collapse. The analysis indicates that the behaviour of the foils depends on both Strouhal number and reduced frequency, but for motions where the viscous drag is small the thrust closely follows a linear dependence on reduced frequency. The scaling laws are also shown to be consistent with biological data on swimming aquatic animals.
  • Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) provides a practical means of extracting insightful dynamical information from fluids datasets. Like any data processing technique, DMD's usefulness is limited by its ability to extract real and accurate dynamical features from noise-corrupted data. Here we show analytically that DMD is biased to sensor noise, and quantify how this bias depends on the size and noise level of the data. We present three modifications to DMD that can be used to remove this bias: (i) a direct correction of the identified bias using known noise properties, (ii) combining the results of performing DMD forwards and backwards in time, and (iii) a total least-squares-inspired algorithm. We discuss the relative merits of each algorithm, and demonstrate the performance of these modifications on a range of synthetic, numerical, and experimental datasets. We further compare our modified DMD algorithms with other variants proposed in recent literature.
  • The Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD)---a popular method for performing data-driven Koopman spectral analysis---has gained increased adoption as a technique for extracting dynamically meaningful spatio-temporal descriptions of fluid flows from snapshot measurements. Often times, DMD descriptions can be used for predictive purposes as well, which enables informed decision-making based on DMD model-forecasts. Despite its widespread use and utility, DMD regularly fails to yield accurate dynamical descriptions when the measured snapshot data are imprecise due to, e.g., sensor noise. Here, we express DMD as a two-stage algorithm in order to isolate a source of systematic error. We show that DMD's first stage, a subspace projection step, systematically introduces bias errors by processing snapshots asymmetrically. To remove this systematic error, we propose utilizing an augmented snapshot matrix in a subspace projection step, as in problems of total least-squares, in order to account for the error present in all snapshots. The resulting unbiased and noise-aware total DMD (TDMD) formulation reduces to standard DMD in the absence of snapshot errors, while the two-stage perspective generalizes the de-biasing framework to other related methods as well. TDMD's performance is demonstrated in numerical and experimental fluids examples.
  • A data-driven procedure for identifying the dominant transport barriers in a time-varying flow from limited quantities of Lagrangian data is presented. Our approach partitions state space into pairs of coherent sets, which are sets of initial conditions chosen to minimize the number of trajectories that "leak" from one set to the other under the influence of a stochastic flow field during a pre-specified interval in time. In practice, this partition is computed by posing an optimization problem, which once solved, yields a pair of functions whose signs determine set membership. From prior experience with synthetic, "data rich" test problems and conceptually related methods based on approximations of the Perron-Frobenius operator, we observe that the functions of interest typically appear to be smooth. As a result, given a fixed amount of data our approach, which can use sets of globally supported basis functions, has the potential to more accurately approximate the desired functions than other functions tailored to use compactly supported indicator functions. This difference enables our approach to produce effective approximations of pairs of coherent sets in problems with relatively limited quantities of Lagrangian data, which is usually the case with real geophysical data. We apply this method to three examples of increasing complexity: the first is the double gyre, the second is the Bickley Jet, and the third is data from numerically simulated drifters in the Sulu Sea.
  • A data driven, kernel-based method for approximating the leading Koopman eigenvalues, eigenfunctions, and modes in problems with high dimensional state spaces is presented. This approach approximates the Koopman operator using a set of scalar observables, which are functions defined on state space, that is determined {\em implicitly} by the choice of a kernel. This circumvents the computational issues that arise due to the number of basis functions required to span a "sufficiently rich" subspace of the space of scalar observables in these problems. We illustrate this method on the FitzHugh-Nagumo PDE, a prototypical example of a one-dimensional reaction diffusion system, and compare our results with related methods such as Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) that have the same computational cost as our approach. In this example, the resulting approximations of the leading Koopman eigenvalues, eigenfunctions, and modes are both more accurate and less sensitive to the distribution of the data used in the computation than those produced by DMD.
  • The formation and accretion of ice on the leading edge of an airfoil can be detrimental to aerodynamic performance. Furthermore, the geometric shape of leading edge ice profiles can vary significantly depending on a wide range of physical parameters, which can translate into a wide variability in aerodynamic performance. The purpose of this work is to explore the variability in airfoil aerodynamic performance that results from variability in leading edge ice shape profile. First, we demonstrate how to identify a low-dimensional set of parameters that governs ice shape from a database of ice shapes using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). Then, we investigate the effects of uncertainty in the POD coefficients. This is done by building a global response surface surrogate using Polynomial Chaos Expansions (PCE). To construct this surrogate efficiently, we use adaptive sparse grid sampling of the POD parameter space. We then analyze the data from a statistical standpoint.
  • We demonstrate that numerically computed approximations of Koopman eigenfunctions and eigenvalues create a natural framework for data fusion in applications governed by nonlinear evolution laws. This is possible because the eigenvalues of the Koopman operator are invariant to invertible transformations of the system state, so that the values of the Koopman eigenfunctions serve as a set of intrinsic coordinates that can be used to map between different observations (e.g., measurements obtained through different sets of sensors) of the same fundamental behavior. The measurements we wish to merge can also be nonlinear, but must be "rich enough" to allow (an effective approximation of) the state to be reconstructed from a single set of measurements. This approach requires independently obtained sets of data that capture the evolution of the heterogeneous measurements and a single pair of "joint" measurements taken at one instance in time. Computational approximations of eigenfunctions and their corresponding eigenvalues from data are accomplished using Extended Dynamic Mode Decomposition. We illustrate this approach on measurements of spatio-temporal oscillations of the FitzHugh-Nagumo PDE, and show how to fuse point measurements with principal component measurements, after which either set of measurements can be used to estimate the other set.
  • The formation and accretion of ice on the leading edge of a wing can be detrimental to airplane performance. Complicating this reality is the fact that even a small amount of uncertainty in the shape of the accreted ice may result in a large amount of uncertainty in aerodynamic performance metrics (e.g., stall angle of attack). The main focus of this work concerns using the techniques of Polynomial Chaos Expansions (PCE) to quantify icing uncertainty much more quickly than traditional methods (e.g., Monte Carlo). First, we present a brief survey of the literature concerning the physics of wing icing, with the intention of giving a certain amount of intuition for the physical process. Next, we give a brief overview of the background theory of PCE. Finally, we compare the results of Monte Carlo simulations to PCE-based uncertainty quantification for several different airfoil icing scenarios. The results are in good agreement and confirm that PCE methods are much more efficient for the canonical airfoil icing uncertainty quantification problem than Monte Carlo methods.
  • The Koopman operator is a linear but infinite dimensional operator that governs the evolution of scalar observables defined on the state space of an autonomous dynamical system, and is a powerful tool for the analysis and decomposition of nonlinear dynamical systems. In this manuscript, we present a data driven method for approximating the leading eigenvalues, eigenfunctions, and modes of the Koopman operator. The method requires a data set of snapshot pairs and a dictionary of scalar observables, but does not require explicit governing equations or interaction with a "black box" integrator. We will show that this approach is, in effect, an extension of Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD), which has been used to approximate the Koopman eigenvalues and modes. Furthermore, if the data provided to the method are generated by a Markov process instead of a deterministic dynamical system, the algorithm approximates the eigenfunctions of the Kolmogorov backward equation, which could be considered as the "stochastic Koopman operator" [1]. Finally, four illustrative examples are presented: two that highlight the quantitative performance of the method when presented with either deterministic or stochastic data, and two that show potential applications of the Koopman eigenfunctions.
  • We formulate a low-storage method for performing dynamic mode decomposition that can be updated inexpensively as new data become available; this formulation allows dynamical information to be extracted from large datasets and data streams. We present two algorithms: the first is mathematically equivalent to a standard "batch-processed" formulation; the second introduces a compression step that maintains computational efficiency, while enhancing the ability to isolate pertinent dynamical information from noisy measurements. Both algorithms reliably capture dominant fluid dynamic behaviors, as demonstrated on cylinder wake data collected from both direct numerical simulations and particle image velocimetry experiments
  • Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is a powerful and increasingly popular tool for performing spectral analysis of fluid flows. However, it requires data that satisfy the Nyquist-Shannon sampling criterion. In many fluid flow experiments, such data are impossible to capture. We propose a new approach that combines ideas from DMD and compressed sensing. Given a vector-valued signal, we take measurements randomly in time (at a sub-Nyquist rate) and project the data onto a low-dimensional subspace. We then use compressed sensing to identify the dominant frequencies in the signal and their corresponding modes. We demonstrate this method using two examples, analyzing both an artificially constructed test dataset and particle image velocimetry data collected from the flow past a cylinder. In each case, our method correctly identifies the characteristic frequencies and oscillatory modes dominating the signal, proving the proposed method to be a capable tool for spectral analysis using sub-Nyquist-rate sampling.
  • Unsteady aerodynamic models are necessary to accurately simulate forces and develop feedback controllers for wings in agile motion; however, these models are often high dimensional or incompatible with modern control techniques. Recently, reduced-order unsteady aerodynamic models have been developed for a pitching and plunging airfoil by linearizing the discretized Navier-Stokes equation with lift-force output. In this work, we extend these reduced-order models to include multiple inputs (pitch, plunge, and surge) and explicit parameterization by the pitch-axis location, inspired by Theodorsen's model. Next, we investigate the na\"{\i}ve application of system identification techniques to input--output data and the resulting pitfalls, such as unstable or inaccurate models. Finally, robust feedback controllers are constructed based on these low-dimensional state-space models for simulations of a rigid flat plate at Reynolds number 100. Various controllers are implemented for models linearized at base angles of attack $\alpha_0=0^\circ, \alpha_0=10^\circ$, and $\alpha_0=20^\circ$. The resulting control laws are able to track an aggressive reference lift trajectory while attenuating sensor noise and compensating for strong nonlinearities.
  • Originally introduced in the fluid mechanics community, dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) has emerged as a powerful tool for analyzing the dynamics of nonlinear systems. However, existing DMD theory deals primarily with sequential time series for which the measurement dimension is much larger than the number of measurements taken. We present a theoretical framework in which we define DMD as the eigendecomposition of an approximating linear operator. This generalizes DMD to a larger class of datasets, including nonsequential time series. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by presenting novel sampling strategies that increase computational efficiency and mitigate the effects of noise, respectively. We also introduce the concept of linear consistency, which helps explain the potential pitfalls of applying DMD to rank-deficient datasets, illustrating with examples. Such computations are not considered in the existing literature, but can be understood using our more general framework. In addition, we show that our theory strengthens the connections between DMD and Koopman operator theory. It also establishes connections between DMD and other techniques, including the eigensystem realization algorithm (ERA), a system identification method, and linear inverse modeling (LIM), a method from climate science. We show that under certain conditions, DMD is equivalent to LIM.
  • This fluid dynamics video depicts the mixing that occurs as a two-dimensional flat plate plunges sinusoidally in a quiescent fluid. Finite-time Lyapunov exponents reveal sets that are attracting or repelling. As the flow field develops, strange faces emerge.
  • In feedback flow control, one of the challenges is to develop mathematical models that describe the fluid physics relevant to the task at hand, while neglecting irrelevant details of the flow in order to remain computationally tractable. A number of techniques are presently used to develop such reduced-order models, such as proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), and approximate snapshot-based balanced truncation, also known as balanced POD. Each method has its strengths and weaknesses: for instance, POD models can behave unpredictably and perform poorly, but they can be computed directly from experimental data; approximate balanced truncation often produces vastly superior models to POD, but requires data from adjoint simulations, and thus cannot be applied to experimental data. In this paper, we show that using the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) \citep{JuPa-85}, one can theoretically obtain exactly the same reduced order models as by balanced POD. Moreover, the models can be obtained directly from experimental data, without the use of adjoint information. The algorithm can also substantially improve computational efficiency when forming reduced-order models from simulation data. If adjoint information is available, then balanced POD has some advantages over ERA: for instance, it produces modes that are useful for multiple purposes, and the method has been generalized to unstable systems. We also present a modified ERA procedure that produces modes without adjoint information, but for this procedure, the resulting models are not balanced, and do not perform as well in examples. We present a detailed comparison of the methods, and illustrate them on an example of the flow past an inclined flat plate at a low Reynolds number.
  • We present an estimator-based control design procedure for flow control, using reduced-order models of the governing equations, linearized about a possibly unstable steady state. The reduced models are obtained using an approximate balanced truncation method that retains the most controllable and observable modes of the system. The original method is valid only for stable linear systems, and we present an extension to unstable linear systems. The dynamics on the unstable subspace are represented by projecting the original equations onto the global unstable eigenmodes, assumed to be small in number. A snapshot-based algorithm is developed, using approximate balanced truncation, for obtaining a reduced-order model of the dynamics on the stable subspace. The proposed algorithm is used to study feedback control of 2-D flow over a flat plate at a low Reynolds number and at large angles of attack, where the natural flow is vortex shedding, though there also exists an unstable steady state. For control design, we derive reduced-order models valid in the neighborhood of this unstable steady state. The actuation is modeled as a localized body force near the leading edge of the flat plate, and the sensors are two velocity measurements in the near-wake of the plate. A reduced-order Kalman filter is developed based on these models and is shown to accurately reconstruct the flow field from the sensor measurements, and the resulting estimator-based control is shown to stabilize the unstable steady state. For small perturbations of the steady state, the model accurately predicts the response of the full simulation. Furthermore, the resulting controller is even able to suppress the stable periodic vortex shedding, where the nonlinear effects are strong, thus implying a large domain of attraction of the stabilized steady state.
  • We study reduced-order models of three-dimensional perturbations in linearized channel flow using balanced proper orthogonal decomposition (BPOD). The models are obtained from three-dimensional simulations in physical space as opposed to the traditional single-wavenumber approach, and are therefore better able to capture the effects of localized disturbances or localized actuators. In order to assess the performance of the models, we consider the impulse response and frequency response, and variation of the Reynolds number as a model parameter. We show that the BPOD procedure yields models that capture the transient growth well at a low order, whereas standard POD does not capture the growth unless a considerably larger number of modes is included, and even then can be inaccurate. In the case of a localized actuator, we show that POD modes which are not energetically significant can be very important for capturing the energy growth. In addition, a comparison of the subspaces resulting from the two methods suggests that the use of a non-orthogonal projection with adjoint modes is most likely the main reason for the superior performance of BPOD. We also demonstrate that for single-wavenumber perturbations, low-order BPOD models reproduce the dominant eigenvalues of the full system better than POD models of the same order. These features indicate that the simple, yet accurate BPOD models are a good candidate for developing model-based controllers for channel flow.
  • We introduce an algorithm based on a method of snapshots for computing approximate balanced truncations for discrete-time, stable, linear time-periodic systems. By construction, this algorithm is applicable to very high-dimensional systems, even with very high-dimensional outputs (or, alternatively, very high-dimensional inputs). An example is shown to validate the method.