• Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • In recent years the possibility of measuring the temporal change of radial and transverse position of sources in the sky in real time have become conceivable thanks to the thoroughly improved technique applied to new astrometric and spectroscopic experiments, leading to the research domain we call Real-time cosmology. We review for the first time great part of the work done in this field, analysing both the theoretical framework and some endeavor to foresee the observational strategies and their capability to constrain models. We firstly focus on real time measurements of the overall redshift drift and angular separation shift in distant source, able to trace background cosmic expansion and large scale anisotropy, respectively. We then examine the possibility of employing the same kind of observations to probe peculiar and proper acceleration in clustered systems and therefore the gravitational potential. The last two sections are devoted to the short time future change of the cosmic microwave background, as well as to the temporal shift of the temperature anisotropy power spectrum and maps. We conclude revisiting in this context the effort made to forecast the power of upcoming experiments like CODEX, GAIA and PLANCK in providing these new observational tools.
  • We consider the case of a coupling in the dark cosmological sector, where a dark energy scalar field modifies the gravitational attraction between dark matter particles. We find that the strength of the coupling {\beta} is constrained using current Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data, including WMAP7 and SPT, to be less than 0.063 (0.11) at 68% (95%) confidence level. Further, we consider the additional effect of the CMB-lensing amplitude, curvature, effective number of relativistic species and massive neutrinos and show that the bound from current data on {\beta} is already strong enough to be rather stable with respect to any of these variables. The strongest effect is obtained when we allow for massive neutrinos, in which case the bound becomes slightly weaker, {\beta} < 0.084(0.14). A larger value of the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom favors larger couplings between dark matter and dark energy as well as values of the spectral index closer to 1. Adding the present constraints on the Hubble constant, as well as from baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae Ia, we find {\beta} < 0.050(0.074). In this case we also find an interesting likelihood peak for {\beta} = 0.041 (still compatible with 0 at 1{\sigma}). This peak comes mostly from a slight difference between the Hubble parameter HST result and the WMAP7+SPT best fit. Finally, we show that forecasts of Planck+SPT mock data can pin down the coupling to a precision of better than 1% and detect whether the marginal peak we find at small non zero coupling is a real effect.
  • Coupling dark energy to dark matter provides one of the simplest way to effectively modify gravity at large scales without strong constraints from local (i.e. solar system) observations. Models of coupled dark energy have been studied several times in the past and are already significantly constrained by cosmic microwave background experiments. In this paper we estimate the constraints that future large-scale observations will be able to put on the coupling and in general on all the parameters of the model. We combine cosmic microwave background, tomographic weak lensing, redshift distortions and power spectrum probes. We show that next-generation observations can improve the current constraint on the coupling to dark matter by two orders of magnitude; this constraint is complementary to the current solar-system bounds on a coupling to baryons.
  • Our peculiar velocity with respect to the CMB rest frame is known to induce a large dipole in the CMB. However, the motion of an observer has also the effect of distorting the anisotropies at all scales, as shown by Challinor and Van Leeuwen (2002), due to aberration and Doppler effects. We propose to measure independently our local motion by using off-diagonal two-point correlation functions for high multipoles. We study the observability of the signal for temperature and polarization anisotropies. We point out that Planck can measure the velocity $\beta$ with an error of about 30% and the direction with an error of about 20 degrees. This method constitutes a cross-check, which can be useful to verify that our CMB dipole is due mainly to our velocity or to disentangle the velocity from other possible intrinsic sources. Although in this paper we focus on our peculiar velocity, a similar effect would result also from other intrinsic vectorial distortion of the CMB which would induce a dipolar lensing. Measuring the off-diagonal correlation terms is therefore a test for a preferred direction on the CMB sky.
  • Cosmic parallax is the change of angular separation between pair of sources at cosmological distances induced by an anisotropic expansion. An accurate astrometric experiment like Gaia could observe or put constraints on cosmic parallax. Examples of anisotropic cosmological models are Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi void models for off-center observers (introduced to explain the observed acceleration without the need for dark energy) and Bianchi metrics. If dark energy has an anisotropic equation of state, as suggested recently, then a substantial anisotropy could arise at $z \lesssim 1$ and escape the stringent constraints from the cosmic microwave background. In this paper we show that such models could be constrained by the Gaia satellite or by an upgraded future mission.
  • High precision measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, as can be expected from the Planck satellite, will require high-accuracy theoretical predictions as well. One possible source of theoretical uncertainty is the numerical error in the output of the Boltzmann codes used to calculate angular power spectra. In this work, we carry out an extensive study of the numerical accuracy of the public Boltzmann code CAMB, and identify a set of parameters which determine the error of its output. We show that at the current default settings, the cosmological parameters extracted from data of future experiments like Planck can be biased by several tenths of a standard deviation for the six parameters of the standard Lambda-CDM model, and potentially more seriously for extended models. We perform an optimisation procedure that leads the code to achieve sufficient precision while at the same time keeping the computation time within reasonable limits. Our conclusion is that the contribution of numerical errors to the theoretical uncertainty of model predictions is well under control -- the main challenges for more accurate calculations of CMB spectra will be of an astrophysical nature instead.
  • We study a set of universe models where the dark sector is described by a perfect fluid with an affine equation of state $P=P_0+\alpha \rho$, focusing specifically on cosmological perturbations in a flat universe. We perform a Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis spanning the full parameter space of the model using the WMAP 5 years data and the SDSS LRG4 survey. The affine fluid can either play the role of a unified dark matter (UDM), accounting for both dark matter and a cosmological constant, or work alongside cold dark matter (CDM), as a form of dark energy. A key ingredient is the sound speed, that depends on the nature of the fluid and that, for any given background model, adds a degree of freedom to the perturbations: in the barotropic case the square of the sound speed is simply equal to the affine parameter $\alpha$; if entropic perturbations are present the effective sound speed has to be specified as an additional parameter. In addition to the barotropic case, we consider the two limiting cases of effective sound speed equal to 0 or 1. For $\alpha=c_s^2=0$ our UDM model is equivalent to the standard $\Lambda$CDM with adiabatic perturbations. Apart of a trivial subcase, all models considered satisfy the data constraints, with quite standard values for the usual cosmological parameters. In general our analysis confirms that cosmological datasets require both a collisionless massive and cold component to form the potential wells that lead to structure formation, and an effective cosmological constant that drives the late accelerated expansion.
  • We explore the dynamics of cosmological models with two coupled dark components with energy densities $\rho_A$ and $\rho_B$. We assume that the coupling is of the form $Q=Hq(\rho_A,\rho_B)$, so that the dynamics of the two components turns out to be scale independent, i.e. does not depend explicitly on the Hubble scalar $H$. With this assumption, we focus on the general linear coupling $q=q_o+q_A\rho_A+q_B\rho_B$, which may be seen as arising from any $q(\rho_A,\rho_B)$ at late time and leads in general to an effective cosmological constant. In the second part of the paper we consider observational constraints on the form of the coupling from SN Ia data, assuming that one of the components is cold dark matter. We find that the constant part of the coupling function is unconstrained by SN Ia data and, among typical linear coupling functions, the one proportional to the dark energy density $\rho_{A}$ is preferred in the strong coupling regime, $|q_{A}|>1$. While phantom models favor a positive coupling function, in non-phantom models, not only a negative coupling function is allowed, but the uncoupled sub-case falls at the border of the likelihood.
  • We consider the hypothesis that dark energy and dark matter are the two faces of a single dark component, a unified dark matter (UDM) that we assume can be modeled by the affine equation of state (EoS) $P= p_0 +\alpha \rho$, resulting in an {\it effective cosmological constant} $\rho_\Lambda=-p_0/(1+\alpha)$. The affine EoS arises from the simple assumption that the speed of sound is constant; it may be seen as an approximation to an unknown barotropic EoS $P=P(\rho)$, and may as well represent the tracking solution for the dynamics of a scalar field with appropriate potential. Furthermore, in principle the affine EoS allows the UDM to be phantom. We constrain the parameters of the model, $\alpha$ and $\Omega_\Lambda$, using data from a suite of different cosmological observations, and perform a comparison with the standard $\Lambda$CDM model, containing both cold dark matter and a cosmological constant. First considering a flat cosmology, we find that the UDM model with affine EoS fits the joint observations very well, better than $\Lambda$CDM, with best fit values $\alpha=0.01 \pm 0.02$ and $\Omega_\Lambda=0.70 \pm 0.04$ (95% confidence intervals). The standard model (best fit $\Omega_\Lambda=0.71\pm 0.04$), having one less parameter, is preferred by a Bayesian model comparison. However, the affine EoS is at least as good as the standard model if a flat curvature is not assumed as a prior for $\Lambda$CDM. For the latter, the best fit values are $\Omega_K=-0.02^{+0.01}_{-0.02} $ and $\Omega_\Lambda=0.71 \pm 0.04$, i.e. a closed model is preferred. A phantom UDM with affine EoS is ruled out well beyond $3\sigma$.
  • We explore the possibility that a scalar field with appropriate Lagrangian can mimic a perfect fluid with an affine barotropic equation of state. The latter can be thought of as a generic cosmological dark component evolving as an effective cosmological constant plus a generalized dark matter. As such, it can be used as a simple, phenomenological model for either dark energy or unified dark matter. Furthermore, it can approximate (up to first order in the energy density) any barotropic dark fluid with arbitrary equation of state. We find that two kinds of Lagrangian for the scalar field can reproduce the desired behaviour: a quintessence-like with a hyperbolic potential, or a purely kinetic k-essence one. We discuss the behaviour of these two classes of models from the point of view of the cosmological background, and we give some hints on their possible clustering properties.
  • We discuss the constraints that future photometric and spectroscopic redshift surveys can put on dark energy through the baryon oscillations of the power spectrum. We model the dark energy either with a perfect fluid or a scalar field and take into account the information contained in the linear growth function. We show that the growth function helps to break the degeneracy in the dark energy parameters and reduce the errors on $w_0,w_1$ roughly by 30% making more appealing multicolor surveys based on photometric redshifts. We find that a 200 square degrees spectroscopic survey reaching $z = 3$ can constrain $w_0,w_1$ to within $\Delta w_0=0.21,\Delta w_1=0.26$ and to $\Delta w_0=0.39,\Delta w_1=0.54$ using photometric redshifts with absolute uncertainty of 0.02. In the scalar field case we show that the slope $n$ of the inverse power-law potential for dark energy can be constrained to $\Delta n=0.26$ (spectroscopic redshifts) or $\Delta n=0.40$ (photometric redshifts), i.e. better than with future ground-based supernovae surveys or CMB data.
  • We present the results of a series of N-body simulations in cosmologies where dark matter (DM) is coupled to dark energy (DE), so easing the cosmic coincidence problem. The dark-dark coupling introduces two novel effects in N-body dynamics: (i) DM particle masses vary with time; (ii) gravity between DM particles is ruled by a constant $G^{*}$, greater than Newton's constant $G$, holding in other 2-body interactions. As a consequence, baryons and DM particle distributions develop a large scale bias. Here we investigate DE models with Ratra-Peebles (RP) potentials; the dark-dark coupling is set in a parametric range compatible with observations, for as concern background and linear perturbation properties. We study the halo mass function, the halo density profile and the behavior of the non-linear bias. We find that non-linear dynamics puts additional constraints to the coupling parameter. They mostly arise from density profiles, that we find to yield higher concentrations, in coupled RP models, with respect to (uncoupled) dynamical DE cosmologies. Such enhancement, although being a strong effect in some coupling parameter range, is just a minor change for smaller but significant values of the coupling parameter. With these further restrictions, coupled DE models with RP potential are consistent with non-linear observables.
  • It is well-known that even high quality cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations are not sufficient on their own to determine the equation of state of the dark energy, due to the effect of the so-called geometric degeneracy at large multipoles and the cosmic variance at small ones. In contrast, we find that CMB data can put tight constraints on another fundamental property of the dark energy, namely its coupling to dark matter. We compare the current high-resolution CMB data to models of dark energy characterized by an inverse power law or exponential potential and by the coupling to dark matter. We determine the curve of degeneracy between the dark energy equation of state and the dimensionless Hubble parameter h and show that even an independent perfect determination of h may be insufficient to distinguish dark energy from a pure cosmological constant with the current dataset. On the other hand, we find that the interaction with dark matter is firmly bounded, regardless of the potential. In terms of the dimensionless ratio \beta of the dark energy interaction to gravity, we find \beta <0.16 (95% c.l.). This implies that the effective equation of state between equivalence and tracking has been close to the pure matter equation of state within 1% and that scalar gravity is at least 40 times weaker than tensor gravity. Further, we show that an experiment limited by cosmic variance only, like the Planck mission, can put an upper bound \beta < 0.05 (95% c.l.). This shows that CMB observations have a strong potentiality not only as a test of cosmic kinematics but also as a gravitational probe.