• We present a study of 7 star-forming galaxies from the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The galaxies are located at relatively low redshifts, $z\sim$0.3, with morphologies ranging from extended and disturbed to compact and smooth. To complement the HST observations we also analyze observations taken with the VIMOS spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). In our galaxy sample we identify three objects with double peak Lyman-$\alpha$ profiles similar to those seen in Green Pea compact galaxies and measure peak separations of 655, 374, and 275 km s$^{-1}$. We measure Lyman-$\alpha$ escape fractions with values ranging between 5-13\%. Given the low flux levels in the individual COS exposures we apply a weighted stacking approach to obtain a single spectrum. From this COS combined spectrum we infer upper limits for the absolute and relative Lyman continuum escape fractions of $f_{\rm abs}(\rm LyC)$ = 0.4$^{+10.1}_{-0.4}$\% and $f_{\rm res}(\rm LyC)$ = 1.7$^{+15.2}_{-1.7}$\%, respectively. Finally, we find that most of these galaxies have moderate UV and optical SFRs (SFRs $\lesssim$ 10 M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$).
  • The cosmological origin of carbon, the fourth most abundant element in the Universe, is not well known and matter of heavy debate. We investigate the behavior of C/O to O/H in order to constrain the production mechanism of carbon. We measured emission-line intensities in a spectral range from 1600 to 10000 \AA\ on Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) long-slit spectra of 18 starburst galaxies in the local Universe. We determined chemical abundances through traditional nebular analysis and we used a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to determine where our carbon and oxygen abundances lie in the parameter space. We conclude that our C and O abundance measurements are sensible. We analyzed the behavior of our sample in the [C/O] vs. [O/H] diagram with respect to other objects such as DLAs, neutral ISM measurements, and disk and halo stars, finding that each type of object seems to be located in a specific region of the diagram. Our sample shows a steeper C/O vs. O/H slope with respect to other samples, suggesting that massive stars contribute more to the production of C than N at higher metallicities, only for objects where massive stars are numerous; otherwise intermediate-mass stars dominate the C and N production.
  • We studied Lyman-$\alpha$ (Ly$\alpha$) escape in a statistical sample of 43 Green Peas with HST/COS Ly$\alpha$ spectra. Green Peas are nearby star-forming galaxies with strong [OIII]$\lambda$5007 emission lines. Our sample is four times larger than the previous sample and covers a much more complete range of Green Pea properties. We found that about 2/3 of Green Peas are strong Ly$\alpha$ line emitters with rest-frame Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width $>20$ \AA. The Ly$\alpha$ profiles of Green Peas are diverse. The Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction, defined as the ratio of observed Ly$\alpha$ flux to intrinsic Ly$\alpha$ flux, shows anti-correlations with a few Ly$\alpha$ kinematic features -- both the blue peak and red peak velocities, the peak separations, and FWHM of the red portion of the Ly$\alpha$ profile. Using properties measured from SDSS optical spectra, we found many correlations -- Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction generally increases at lower dust reddening, lower metallicity, lower stellar mass, and higher [OIII]/[OII] ratio. We fit their Ly$\alpha$ profiles with the HI shell radiative transfer model and found Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction anti-correlates with the best-fit $N_{HI}$. Finally, we fit an empirical linear relation to predict Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction from the dust extinction and Ly$\alpha$ red peak velocity. The standard deviation of this relation is about 0.3 dex. This relation can be used to isolate the effect of IGM scatterings from Ly$\alpha$ escape and to probe the IGM optical depth along the line of sight of each $z>7$ Ly$\alpha$ emission line galaxy in the JWST era.
  • Green Peas are nearby analogs of high-redshift Ly$\alpha$-emitting galaxies. To probe their Ly$\alpha$ escape, we study the spatial profiles of Ly$\alpha$ and UV continuum emission of 24 Green Pea galaxies using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We extract the spatial profiles of Ly$\alpha$ emission from their 2D COS spectra, and of UV continuum from both the 2D spectra and NUV images. The Ly$\alpha$ emission shows more extended spatial profiles than the UV continuum in most Green Peas. The deconvolved Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) of the Ly$\alpha$ spatial profile is about 2 to 4 times that of the UV continuum in most cases. Since Green Peas are analogs of high-z LAEs, it suggests that most high-z LAEs likely have larger Ly$\alpha$ sizes than UV sizes. We also compare the spatial profiles of Ly$\alpha$ photons at blueshifted and redshifted velocities in eight Green Peas with sufficient data quality, and find the blue wing of the Ly$\alpha$ line has a larger spatial extent than the red wing in four Green Peas with comparatively weak blue Ly$\alpha$ line wings. We show that Green Peas and MUSE $z=3-6$ LAEs have similar Ly$\alpha$ and UV continuum sizes, which probably suggests starbursts in both low-z and high-z LAEs drive similar gas outflows illuminated by Ly$\alpha$ light. Five Lyman continuum (LyC) leakers in this sample have similar Ly$\alpha$ to UV continuum size ratios (~1.4-4.3) to the other Green Peas, indicating their LyC emission escape through ionized holes in the interstellar medium.
  • Galactic outflows are believed to play an important role in regulating star formation in galaxies, but estimates of the outflowing mass and momentum have historically been based on uncertain assumptions. Here, we measure the mass, momentum, and energy outflow rates of seven nearby star-forming galaxies using ultraviolet absorption lines and observationally motivated estimates for the density, metallicity, and radius of the outflow. Low-mass galaxies generate outflows faster than their escape velocities with mass outflow rates up to twenty times larger than their star formation rates. These outflows from low-mass galaxies also have momenta larger than provided from supernovae alone, indicating that multiple momentum sources drive these outflows. Only 1-20\% of the supernovae energy is converted into kinetic energy, and this fraction decreases with increasing stellar mass such that low-mass galaxies drive more efficient outflows. We find scaling relations between the outflows and the stellar mass of their host galaxies (M$_\ast$) at the 2-3$\sigma$ significance level. The mass-loading factor, or the mass outflow rate divided by the star formation rate, scales as M$_\ast^{-0.4}$ and with the circular velocity as v$_\mathrm{circ}^{-1.6}$. The scaling of the mass-loading factor is similar to recent simulations, but the observations are a factor of five smaller, possibly indicating that there is a substantial amount of unprobed gas in a different ionization phase. The outflow momenta are consistent with a model where star formation drives the outflow while gravity counteracts this acceleration.
  • To evaluate the impact of stellar feedback, it is critical to estimate the mass outflow rates of galaxies. Past estimates have been plagued by uncertain assumptions about the outflow geometry, metallicity, and ionization fraction. Here we use Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectroscopic observations of the nearby starburst NGC 6090 to demonstrate that many of these quantities can be constrained by the data. We use the Si~{\sc IV} absorption lines to calculate the scaling of velocity (v), covering fraction (C$_f$), and density with distance from the starburst (r), assuming the Sobolev optical depth and a velocity law of the form: v$~\propto(1 -\mathrm{R}_\mathrm{i}/\mathrm{r} )^\beta$ (where R$_\mathrm{i}$ is the inner outflow radius). We find that the velocity ($\beta$=0.43) is consistent with an outflow driven by an r$^{-2}$ force with the outflow radially accelerated, while the scaling of the covering fraction ($C_f \propto \mathrm{r}^{-0.82}$) suggests that cool clouds in the outflow are in pressure equilibrium with an adiabatically expanding medium. We use the column densities of four weak metal lines and CLOUDY photoionization models to determine the outflow metallicity, the ionization correction, and the initial density of the outflow. Combining these values with the profile fitting, we find R$_\mathrm{i}$ = 63 pc, with most of the mass within 300~pc of the starburst. Finally, we find that the maximum mass outflow rate is 2.3~M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ and the mass loading factor (outflow divided by the star formation rate) is 0.09, a factor of 10 lower than the value calculated using common assumptions for the geometry, metallicity and ionization structure of the outflow.
  • We report on the detection of Lyman continuum radiation in two nearby starburst galaxies. Tol 0440-381, Tol 1247-232 and Mrk 54 were observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescopes. The three galaxies have radial velocities of ~13,000 km/s, permitting a ~35 A window on the restframe Lyman continuum shortward of the Milky Way Lyman edge at 912 A. The chosen instrument configuration using the G140L grating covers the spectral range from 912 to 2,000 {\AA}. We developed a dedicated background subtraction method to account for temporal and spatial background variations of the detector, which is crucial at the low flux levels around 912 A. This modified pipeline allowed us to significantly improve the statistical and systematic detector noise and will be made available to the community. We detect Lyman continuum in all three galaxies. However, we conservatively interpret the emission in Tol 0440-381 as an upper limit due to possible contamination by geocoronal Lyman series lines. We determined the current star-formation properties from the far-ultraviolet continuum and spectral lines and used synthesis models to predict the Lyman continuum radiation emitted by the current population of hot stars. We discuss the various model uncertainties such as, among others, atmospheres and evolution models. Lyman continuum escape fractions were derived from a comparison between the observed and predicted Lyman continuum fluxes. Tol 1247-232, Mrk 54 and Tol 0440-381 have absolute escape fractions of (4.5 +/- 1.2)%, (2.5 +/- 0.72)% and <(7.1 +/- 1.1)%, respectively.
  • We study the ionization structure of galactic outflows in 37 nearby, star forming galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We use the O I, Si II, Si III, and Si IV ultraviolet absorption lines to characterize the different ionization states of outflowing gas. We measure the equivalent widths, line widths, and outflow velocities of the four transitions, and find shallow scaling relations between them and galactic stellar mass and star formation rate. Regardless of the ionization potential, lines of similar strength have similar velocities and line widths, indicating that the four transitions can be modeled as a co-moving phase. The Si equivalent width ratios (e.g. Si IV/Si II) have low dispersion, and little variation with stellar mass; while ratios with O I and Si vary by a factor of 2 for a given stellar mass. Photo-ionization models reproduce these equivalent width ratios, while shock models under predict the relative amount of high ionization gas. The photo-ionization models constrain the ionization parameter (U) between -2.25 < log(U) < -1.5, and require that the outflow metallicities are greater than 0.5 Z$_\odot$. We derive ionization fractions for the transitions, and show that the range of ionization parameters and stellar metallicities leads to a factor of 1.15-10 variation in the ionization fractions. Historically, mass outflow rates are calculated by converting a column density measurement from a single metal ion into a total Hydrogen column density using an ionization fraction, thus mass outflow rates are sensitive to the assumed ionization structure of the outflow.
  • Using ultra-violet absorption-lines, we analyze the systematic properties of the warm ionized phase of starburst-driven winds in a sample of 39 low-redshift objects that spans broad ranges in starburst and galaxy properties. Total column densities for the outflows are $\sim$10$^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$. The outflow velocity (v$_{out}$) correlates only weakly with the galaxy stellar mass (M$_*$), or circular velocity (v$_{cir}$), but strongly with both SFR and SFR/area. The normalized outflow velocity (v$_{out}/v_{cir}$) correlates well with both SFR/area and SFR/M$_*$. The estimated outflow rates of warm ionized gas ($\dot{M}$) are $\sim$ 1 to 4 times the SFR, and the ratio $\dot{M}/SFR$ does not correlate with v$_{out}$. We show that a model of a population of clouds accelerated by the combined forces of gravity and the momentum flux from the starburst matches the data. We find a threshold value for the ratio of the momentum flux supplied by the starburst to the critical momentum flux needed for the wind to overcome gravity acting on the clouds ($R_{crit}$). For $R_{crit} >$ 10 (strong-outflows) the outflow momentum flux is similar to the total momentum flux from the starburst and the outflow velocity exceeds the galaxy escape velocity. Neither is the case for the weak-outflows ($R_{crit} <$ 10). For the weak-outflows, the data severely disagree with many prescriptions in numerical simulations or semi-analytic models of galaxy evolution. The agreement is better for the strong-outflows, and we advocate the use of $R_{crit}$ to guide future prescriptions.
  • We investigate the supernova-driven galactic wind of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 7552, using both ground-based optical nebular emission lines and far-ultraviolet absorption lines measured with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. We detect broad (~300 km/s) blueshifted (-40 km/s) optical emission lines associated with the galaxy's kpc-scale star-forming ring. The broad line kinematics and diagnostic line ratios suggest that the H-alpha emission comes from clouds of high density gas entrained in a turbulent outflow. We compare the H-alpha emission line profile to the UV absorption line profile measured along a coincident sight line and find significant differences. The maximum blueshift of the H-alpha-emitting gas is ~290 km/s, whereas the UV line profile extends to blueshifts upwards of 1000 km/s. The mass outflow rate estimated from the UV is roughly nine times greater than that estimated from H-alpha. We argue that the H-alpha emission traces a cluster-scale outflow of dense, low velocity gas at the base of the large-scale wind. We suggest that UV absorption line measurements are therefore more reliable tracers of warm gas in starburst-driven outflows.
  • We present a high spatial resolution optical and infrared study of the circumnuclear region in Arp 220, a late-stage galaxy merger. Narrowband imaging using HST/WFC3 has resolved the previously observed peak in H$\alpha$+[NII] emission into a bubble-shaped feature. This feature measures 1.6" in diameter, or 600 pc, and is only 1" northwest of the western nucleus. The bubble is aligned with the western nucleus and the large-scale outflow axis seen in X-rays. We explore several possibilities for the bubble origin, including a jet or outflow from a hidden active galactic nucleus (AGN), outflows from high levels of star formation within the few hundred pc nuclear gas disk, or an ultraluminous X-ray source. An obscured AGN or high levels of star formation within the inner $\sim$100 pc of the nuclei are favored based on the alignment of the bubble and energetics arguments.
  • We present images from the Solar Blind Channel on HST that resolve hundreds of far ultraviolet (FUV) emitting stars in two ~1 kpc$^2$ interarm regions of the grand-design spiral M101. The luminosity functions of these stars are compared with predicted distributions from simple star formation histories, and are best reproduced when the star formation rate has declined recently (past 10-50 Myr). This pattern is consistent with stars forming within spiral arms and then streaming into the interarm regions. We measure the diffuse FUV surface brightness after subtracting all of the detected stars, clusters and background galaxies. A residual flux is found for both regions which can be explained by a mix of stars below our detection limit and scattered FUV light. The amount of scattered light required is much larger for the region immediately adjacent to a spiral arm, a bright source of FUV photons.
  • We have observed a sample of 14 nearby ($z \sim 0.03$) star-forming blue compact galaxies in the rest-frame far-UV ($\sim1150-2200 \AA$) using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We have also generated a grid of stellar population synthesis models using the Starburst99 evolutionary synthesis code, allowing us to compare observations and theoretical predictions for the SiIV_1400 and CIV_1550 UV indices; both are comprised of a blend of stellar wind and interstellar lines and have been proposed as metallicity diagnostics in the UV. Our models and observations both demonstrate that there is a positive linear correlation with metallicity for both indices, and we find generally good agreement between our observations and the predictions of the Starburst99 models. By combining the rest-frame UV observations with pre-existing rest-frame optical spectrophotometry of our blue compact galaxy sample, we also directly compare the predictions of metallicity and extinction diagnostics across both wavelength regimes. This comparison reveals a correlation between the UV absorption and optical strong-line diagnostics, offering the first means of directly comparing ISM properties determined across different rest-frame regimes. Finally, using our Starburst99 model grid we determine theoretical values for the short-wavelength UV continuum slope, $\beta_{18}$, that can be used for determining extinction in rest-frame UV spectra of star-forming galaxies. We consider the implications of these results and discuss future work aimed at parameterizing these and other environmental diagnostics in the UV as well as the development of robust comparisons between ISM diagnostics across a broad wavelength baseline.
  • We report on a sample of 51 nearby, star-forming galaxies observed with the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We calculate Si II kinematics and densities arising from warm gas entrained in galactic outflows. We use multi-wavelength ancillary data to estimate stellar masses (M$_\ast$), star-formation rates (SFR), and morphologies. We derive significant correlations between outflow velocity and SFR$^{\sim 0.1}$, M$_\ast^{\sim 0.1}$ and v$_\text{circ}^{\sim 1/2}$. Some mergers drive outflows faster than these relations prescribe, launching the outflow faster than the escape velocity. Calculations of the mass outflow rate reveal strong scaling with SFR$^{\sim 1/2}$ and M$_\ast^{\sim 1/2}$. Additionally, mass-loading efficiency factors (mass outflow rate divided by SFR) scale approximately as M$_\ast^{-1/2}$. Both the outflow velocity and mass-loading scaling suggest that these outflows are powered by supernovae, with only 0.7% of the total supernovae energy converted into the kinetic energy of the warm outflow. Galaxies lose some gas if log(M$_\ast$/M$_\odot$) < $9.5$, while more massive galaxies retain all of their gas, unless they undergo a merger. This threshold for gas loss can explain the observed shape of the mass-metallicity relation.
  • Identifying the population of galaxies that was responsible for the reionization of the universe is a long-standing quest in astronomy. We present a possible local analog that has an escape fraction of ionizing flux of 21%. Our detection confirms the existence of gaps in the neutral gas enveloping the starburst region. The candidate contains a massive yet highly compact star-forming region. The gaps are most likely created by the unusually strong winds and intense ionizing radiation produced by this extreme object. Our study also validates the indirect technique of using the residual flux in saturated low-ionization interstellar absorption-lines for identifying such leaky galaxies. Since direct detection of ionizing flux is impossible at the epoch of reionization, this is a highly valuable technique for future studies.
  • We present a new set of synthesis models for stellar populations obtained with Starburst99, which are based on new stellar evolutionary tracks with rotation. We discuss models with zero rotation velocity and with velocities of 40% of the break-up velocity on the zero-age main-sequence. These values are expected to bracket realistic rotation velocity distributions in stellar populations. The new rotating models for massive stars are more luminous and hotter due to a larger convective core and enhanced surface abundances. This results in pronounced changes in the integrated spectral energy distribution of a population containing massive stars. The changes are most significant at the shortest wavelengths where an increase of the ionizing luminosity by up to a factor of 5 is predicted. We also show that high equivalent widths of recombination lines may not necessarily indicate a very young age but can be achieved at ages as late as 10 Myr. Comparison of these two boundary cases (0 and 40% of the break-up velocity) will allow users to evaluate the effects of rotation and provide guidance for calibrating the stellar evolution models. We also introduce a new theoretical ultraviolet spectral library built from the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) atmospheres. Its purpose is to help identify signatures of Wolf-Rayet stars in the ultraviolet whose strength is sensitive to the particulars of the evolution models. The new models are available for solar and 1/7th solar metallicities. A complete suite of models can be generated on the Starburst99 website (www.stsci.edu/science/starburst99/). The updated Starburst99 package can be retrieved from this website as well.
  • The impact of new stellar evolution models with rotation on the predictions of population synthesis models is discussed. Massive rotating stars have larger convective cores than their non-rotating counterparts, and their outer layers are chemically enriched due to increased mixing. Together, these two effects lead to hotter and more luminous stars, in particular during later evolutionary phases. As a result, stellar populations containing massive stars are predicted to become more luminous for a given mass and to emit more ionizing photons. Depending on the assumed rotation velocity, rotation causes profound changes in the properties of young stellar populations. These changes are most noticeable at later evolutionary phases and at shorter wavelengths of the spectral energy distribution. Most strikingly, the Lyman continuum luminosity increases by up to a factor of five in O- and Wolf-Rayet stars. Care is required when comparing these models to observations, and some fine-tuning of the models is still required before recalibrations of star-formation indicators should be attempted.
  • Super star cluster A1 in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 3125 is characterized by broad He\ii \lam1640 emission (full width at half maximum, $FWHM\sim1200$ km s$^{-1}$) of unprecedented strength (equivalent width, $EW=7.1\pm0.4$ \AA). Previous attempts to characterize the massive star content in NGC 3125-A1 were hampered by the low resolution of the UV spectrum and the lack of co-spatial panchromatic data. We obtained far-UV to near-IR spectroscopy of the two principal emitting regions in the galaxy with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (\hst). We use these data to study three clusters in the galaxy, A1, B1, and B2. We derive cluster ages of 3-4 Myr, intrinsic reddenings of $E(B-V)=0.13$, 0.15, and 0.13, and cluster masses of $1.7\times10^5$, $1.4\times10^5$, and $1.1\times10^5$ M$_\odot$, respectively. A1 and B2 show O\vb \lam1371 absorption from massive stars, which is rarely seen in star-forming galaxies, and have Wolf-Rayet (WR) to O star ratios of $N(WN5-6)/N(O)=0.23$ and 0.10, respectively. The high $N(WN5-6)/N(O)$ ratio of A1 cannot be reproduced by models that use a normal IMF and generic WR star line luminosities. We rule out that the extraordinary He\ii \lam1640 emission and O\vb \lam1371 absorption of A1 are due to an extremely flat upper IMF exponent, and suggest that they originate in the winds of very massive ($>120\,M_\odot$) stars. In order to reproduce the properties of peculiar clusters such as A1, the present grid of stellar evolution tracks implemented in Starburst99 needs to be extended to masses $>120\,M_\odot$.
  • Stellar emission and absorption lines are routinely observed in galaxies at redshifts up to 5 with spectrographs on 8-10m class telescopes. While the overall spectra are well understood and have been successfully modeled using empirical and theoretical libraries, some challenges remain. Three issues are discussed: determining abundances using stellar and interstellar spectral lines, understanding the origin of the strong, stellar He II 1640 line, and gauging the influence of stellar Lyman-alpha on the combined stellar+nebular profile. All three issues can be tackled with recently created theoretical stellar libraries for hot stars which take into account the radiation-hydrodynamics of stellar winds.
  • The young stellar population of a star-forming galaxy is the primary engine driving its radiative properties. As a result, the age of a galaxy's youngest generation of stars is critical for a detailed understanding of its star formation history, stellar content, and evolutionary state. Here we present predicted equivalent widths for the H-beta, H-alpha, and Br-gamma recombination lines as a function of stellar population age. The equivalent widths are produced by the latest generations of stellar evolutionary tracks and the Starburst99 stellar population synthesis code, and are the first to fully account for the combined effects of both nebular emission and continuum absorption produced by the synthetic stellar population. Our grid of model stellar populations spans six metallicities (0.001 < Z < 0.04), two treatments of star formation history (a 10^6 Mo instantaneous burst and a continuous star formation rate of 1 Mo/yr), and two different treatments of initial rotation rate (v_rot = 0.0v_crit and 0.4v_crit). We also investigate the effects of varying the initial mass function. Given constraints on galaxy metallicity, our predicted equivalent widths can be applied to observations of star-forming galaxies to approximate the age of their young stellar populations.
  • We have compiled a library of stellar Lyman-alpha equivalent widths in O and B stars using the model atmosphere codes CMFGEN and TLUSTY, respectively. The equivalent widths range from about 0 to 30 \AA in absorption for early-O to mid-B stars. The purpose of this library is the prediction of the underlying stellar Lyman-alpha absorption in stellar populations of star-forming galaxies with nebular Lyman-alpha emission. We implemented the grid of individual equivalent widths into the Starburst99 population synthesis code to generate synthetic Lyman-alpha equivalent widths for representative star-formation histories. A starburst observed after 10 Myr will produce a stellar Lyman-alpha line with an equivalent width of $\sim$ -10$\pm$4 \AA in absorption for a Salpeter initial mass function. The lower value (deeper absorption) results for an instantaneous burst, and the higher value (shallower line) for continuous star formation. Depending on the escape fraction of nebular Lyman-alpha photons, the effect of stellar Lyman-alpha on the total profile ranges from negligible to dominant. If the nebular escape fraction is 10%, the stellar absorption and nebular emission equivalent widths become comparable for continuous star formation at ages of 10 to 20 Myr.
  • We use the chemical evolution predictions of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with our latest theoretical stellar population synthesis, photoionization and shock models to predict the strong line evolution of ensembles of galaxies from z=3 to the present day. In this paper, we focus on the brightest optical emission-line ratios, [NII]/H-alpha and [OIII]/H-beta. We use the optical diagnostic Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich (BPT) diagram as a tool for investigating the spectral properties of ensembles of active galaxies. We use four redshift windows chosen to exploit new near-infrared multi-object spectrographs. We predict how the BPT diagram will appear in these four redshift windows given different sets of assumptions. We show that the position of star-forming galaxies on the BPT diagram traces the ISM conditions and radiation field in galaxies at a given redshift. Galaxies containing AGN form a mixing sequence with purely star-forming galaxies. This mixing sequence may change dramatically with cosmic time, due to the metallicity sensitivity of the optical emission-lines. Furthermore, the position of the mixing sequence may probe metallicity gradients in galaxies as a function of redshift, depending on the size of the AGN narrow line region. We apply our latest slow shock models for gas shocked by galactic-scale winds. We show that at high redshift, galactic wind shocks are clearly separated from AGN in line ratio space. Instead, shocks from galactic winds mimic high metallicity starburst galaxies. We discuss our models in the context of future large near-infrared spectroscopic surveys.
  • We obtained medium-resolution ultraviolet (UV) spectra between 1150 and 1450 Angstroms of the four UV-bright, infrared (IR)-luminous starburst galaxies IRAS F08339+6517, NGC 3256, NGC 6090, and NGC 7552 using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The selected sightlines towards the starburst nuclei probe the properties of the recently formed massive stars and the physical conditions in the starburst-driven galactic superwinds. Despite being metal-rich and dusty, all four galaxies are strong Lyman-alpha emitters with equivalent widths ranging between 2 and 13 Angstroms. The UV spectra show strong P Cygni-type high-ionization features indicative of stellar winds and blueshifted low-ionization lines formed in the interstellar and circumgalactic medium. We detect outflowing gas with bulk velocities of about 400 km/s and maximum velocities of almost 900 km/s. These are among the highest values found in the local universe and comparable to outflow velocities found in luminous Lyman-break galaxies at intermediate and high redshift. The outflow velocities are unlikely to be high enough to cause escape of material from the galactic gravitational potential. However, the winds are significant for the evolution of the galaxies by transporting heavy elements from the starburst nuclei and enriching the galaxy halos. The derived mass outflow rates of ~100 Msol/yr are comparable to, or even higher than the star-formation rates. The outflows can quench star formation and ultimately regulate the starburst as has been suggested for high-redshift galaxies.
  • The timing and duration of the reionization epoch is crucial to the emergence and evolution of structure in the universe. The relative roles that star-forming galaxies, active galactic nuclei and quasars play in contributing to the metagalactic ionizing background across cosmic time remains uncertain. Deep quasar counts provide insights into their role, but the potentially crucial contribution from star-formation is highly uncertain due to our poor understanding of the processes that allow ionizing radiation to escape into the intergalactic medium (IGM). The fraction of ionizing photons that escape from star-forming galaxies is a fundamental free parameter used in models to "fine-tune" the timing and duration of the reionization epoch that occurred somewhere between 13.4 and 12.7 Gyrs ago (redshifts between 12 > z > 6). However, direct observation of Lyman continuum (LyC) photons emitted below the rest frame \ion{H}{1} ionization edge at 912 \AA\ is increasingly improbable at redshifts z > 3, due to the steady increase of intervening Lyman limit systems towards high z. Thus UV and U-band optical bandpasses provide the only hope for direct, up close and in depth, observations of the types of environment that favor LyC escape. By quantifying the evolution over the past 11 billion years (z < 3) of the relationships between LyC escape and local and global parameters ..., we can provide definitive information on the LyC escape fraction that is so crucial to answering the question of, how did the universe come to be ionized? Here we provide estimates of the ionizing continuum flux emitted by "characteristic" (L_{uv}^*) star-forming galaxies as a function of look back time and escape fraction, finding that at z = 1 (7.6 Gyrs ago) L_{uv}^* galaxies with an escape fraction of 1% have a flux of 10^{-19} ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1} \AA^{-1}.
  • We present a sample of synthetic massive stellar populations created using the Starburst99 evolutionary synthesis code and new sets of stellar evolutionary tracks, including one set that adopts a detailed treatment of rotation. Using the outputs of the Starburst99 code, we compare the populations' integrated properties, including ionizing radiation fields, bolometric luminosities, and colors. With these comparisons we are able to probe the specific effects of rotation on the properties of a stellar population. We find that a population of rotating stars produces a much harder ionizing radiation field and a higher bolometric luminosity, changes that are primarily attributable to the effects of rotational mixing on the lifetimes, luminosities, effective temperatures, and mass loss rates of massive stars. We consider the implications of the profound effects that rotation can have on a stellar population, and discuss the importance of refining stellar evolutionary models for future work in the study of extragalactic, and particularly high-redshift, stellar populations.