• We discuss the progress in integration of nanodiamonds with photonic devices for quantum optics applications. Experimental results in GaP, SiO2 and SiC-nanodiamond platforms show that various regimes of light and matter interaction can be achieved by engineering color center systems through hybrid approaches. We present our recent results on the growth of color center-rich nanodiamond on prefabricated 3C-SiC microdisk resonators. These hybrid devices achieve up to five-fold enhancement of diamond color center light emission and can be employed for integrated quantum photonics.
  • We demonstrate cavity-enhanced Raman emission from a single atomic defect in a solid. Our platform is a single silicon-vacancy center in diamond coupled with a monolithic diamond photonic crystal cavity. The cavity enables an unprecedented frequency tuning range of the Raman emission (100 GHz) that significantly exceeds the spectral inhomogeneity of silicon-vacancy centers in diamond nanostructures. We also show that the cavity selectively suppresses the phonon-induced spontaneous emission that degrades the efficiency of Raman photon generation. Our results pave the way towards photon-mediated many-body interactions between solid-state quantum emitters in a nanophotonic platform.
  • Quantum emitters are an integral component for a broad range of quantum technologies including quantum communication, quantum repeaters, and linear optical quantum computation. Solid-state color centers are promising candidates for scalable quantum optics due to their long coherence time and small inhomogeneous broadening. However, once excited, color centers often decay through phonon-assisted processes, limiting the efficiency of single photon generation and photon mediated entanglement generation. Herein, we demonstrate strong enhancement of spontaneous emission rate of a single silicon-vacancy center in diamond embedded within a monolithic optical cavity, reaching a regime where the excited state lifetime is dominated by spontaneous emission into the cavity mode. We observe 10-fold lifetime reduction and 42-fold enhancement in emission intensity when the cavity is tuned into resonance with the optical transition of a single silicon-vacancy center, corresponding to 90% of the excited state energy decay occurring through spontaneous emission into the cavity mode. We also demonstrate the largest to date coupling strength ($g/2\pi=4.9\pm0.3 GHz$) and cooperativity ($C=1.4$) for color-center-based cavity quantum electrodynamics systems, bringing the system closer to the strong coupling regime.
  • The theoretical community has found interest in the ability of a two-level atom to generate a strong many-body interaction with light under pulsed excitation. Single-photon generation is the most well-known effect, where a short Gaussian laser pulse is converted into a Lorentzian single-photon wavepacket. However, recent proposals have surprisingly suggested that scattering with intense laser fields off a two-level atom may generate oscillations in two-photon emission that are out of phase with its Rabi oscillations, as the power of the pulse increases. Here, we provide an intuitive explanation for these oscillations using a quantum trajectory approach and show how they may preferentially result in emission of two-photon pulses. Experimentally, we observe signatures of these oscillations by measuring the bunching of photon pulses scattered off a two-level quantum system. Our theory and measurements provide crucial insight into the re-excitation process that plagues on-demand single-photon sources while suggesting the production of novel multi-photon states.
  • In the last decade, there has been remarkable progress on the practical integration of on-chip quantum photonic devices yet quantum state generators remain an outstanding challenge. Simultaneously, the quantum-dot photonic-crystal-resonator platform has demonstrated a versatility for creating nonclassical light with tunable quantum statistics, thanks to a newly discovered self-homodyning interferometric effect that preferentially selects the quantum light over the classical light when using an optimally tuned Fano resonance. In this work, we propose a general structure for the cavity quantum electrodynamical generation of quantum states from a waveguide-integrated version of the quantum-dot photonic-crystal-resonator platform, which is specifically tailored for preferential quantum state transmission. We support our results with rigorous Finite-Difference Time-Domain and quantum optical simulations, and show how our proposed device can serve as a robust generator of highly pure single- and even multi-photon states.
  • We investigate the dynamics of single- and multi-photon emission from detuned strongly coupled systems based on the quantum-dot-photonic-crystal resonator platform. Transmitting light through such systems can generate a range of non-classical states of light with tunable photon counting statistics due to the nonlinear ladder of hybridized light-matter states. By controlling the detuning between emitter and resonator, the transmission can be tuned to strongly enhance either single- or two-photon emission processes. Despite the strongly-dissipative nature of these systems, we find that by utilizing a self-homodyne interference technique combined with frequency-filtering we are able to find a strong two-photon component of the emission in the multi-photon regime. In order to explain our correlation measurements, we propose rate equation models that capture the dominant processes of emission both in the single- and multi-photon regimes. These models are then supported by quantum-optical simulations that fully capture the frequency filtering of emission from our solid-state system.
  • Arrays of identical and individually addressable qubits lay the foundation for the creation of scalable quantum hardware such as quantum processors and repeaters. Silicon vacancy centers in diamond (SiV) offer excellent physical properties such as low inhomogeneous broadening, fast photon emission, and a large Debye-Waller factor, while the possibility for all-optical ultrafast manipulation and techniques to extend the spin coherence times make them very promising candidates for qubits. Here, we have developed arrays of nanopillars containing single SiV centers with high yield, and we demonstrate ultrafast all-optical complete coherent control of the state of a single SiV center. The high quality of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown SiV centers provides excellent spectral stability, which allows us to coherently manipulate and quasi-resonantly read out the state of individual SiV centers on picosecond timescales using ultrafast optical pulses. This work opens new opportunities towards the creation of a scalable on-chip diamond platform for quantum information processing and scalable nanophotonics applications.
  • The rapid generation of non-classical light serves as the foundation for exploring quantum optics and developing applications such as secure communication or generation of NOON-states. While strongly coupled quantum dot-photonic crystal resonator systems have great potential as non-classical light sources due to their promise of tailored output statistics, the generation of indistinguishable photons has been obscured due to the strongly dissipative nature of such systems. Here, we demonstrate that the recently discovered self-homodyne suppression technique can be used to overcome this limitation and tune the quantum statistics of transmitted light, achieving indistinguishable photon emission competitive with state-of-the-art metrics. Furthermore, our nanocavity-based platform directly lends itself to scalable on-chip architectures for quantum information.
  • The study of light-matter interaction at the quantum scale has been enabled by the cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) architecture, in which a quantum two-level system strongly couples to a single cavity mode. Originally implemented with atoms in optical cavities, CQED effects are now also observed with artificial atoms in solid-state environments. Such realizations of these systems exhibit fast dynamics, which makes them attractive candidates for devices including modulators and sources in high-throughput communications. However, these systems possess large photon out-coupling rates that obscure any quantum behavior at large excitation powers. Here, we have utilised a self-homodyning interferometric technique that fully employs the complex mode structure of our nanofabricated cavity to observe a quantum phenomenon known as the dynamic Mollow triplet. We expect this interference to facilitate the development of arbitrary on-chip quantum state generators, thereby strongly influencing quantum lithography, metrology, and imaging.
  • Strongly coupled quantum dot-cavity systems provide a non-linear configuration of hybridized light-matter states with promising quantum-optical applications. Here, we investigate the coherent interaction between strong laser pulses and quantum dot-cavity polaritons. Resonant excitation of polaritonic states and their interaction with phonons allow us to observe coherent Rabi oscillations and Ramsey fringes. Furthermore, we demonstrate complete coherent control of a quantum dot-photonic crystal cavity based quantum-bit. By controlling the excitation power and phase in a two-pulse excitation scheme we achieve access to the full Bloch sphere. Quantum-optical simulations are in good agreement with our experiments and provide insight into the decoherence mechanisms.
  • We demonstrate a new approach for engineering group IV semiconductor-based quantum photonic structures containing negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV$^-$) color centers in diamond as quantum emitters. Hybrid SiC/diamond structures are realized by combining the growth of nanoand micro-diamonds on silicon carbide (3C or 4H polytype) substrates, with the subsequent use of these diamond crystals as a hard mask for pattern transfer. SiV$^-$ color centers are incorporated in diamond during its synthesis from molecular diamond seeds (diamondoids), with no need for ionimplantation or annealing. We show that the same growth technique can be used to grow a diamond layer controllably doped with SiV$^-$ on top of a high purity bulk diamond, in which we subsequently fabricate nanopillar arrays containing high quality SiV$^-$ centers. Scanning confocal photoluminescence measurements reveal optically active SiV$^-$ lines both at room temperature and low temperature (5 K) from all fabricated structures, and, in particular, very narrow linewidths and small inhomogeneous broadening of SiV$^-$ lines from all-diamond nano-pillar arrays, which is a critical requirement for quantum computation. At low temperatures (5 K) we observe in these structures the signature typical of SiV$^-$ centers in bulk diamond, consistent with a double lambda. These results indicate that high quality color centers can be incorporated into nanophotonic structures synthetically with properties equivalent to those in bulk diamond, thereby opening opportunities for applications in classical and quantum information processing.
  • We investigate the influence of exciton-phonon coupling on the dynamics of a strongly coupled quantum dot-photonic crystal cavity system and explore the effects of this interaction on different schemes for non-classical light generation. By performing time-resolved measurements, we map out the detuning-dependent polariton lifetime and extract the spectrum of the polariton-to-phonon coupling with unprecedented precision. Photon-blockade experiments for different pulse-length and detuning conditions (supported by quantum optical simulations) reveal that achieving high-fidelity photon blockade requires an intricate understanding of the phonons' influence on the system dynamics. Finally, we achieve direct coherent control of the polariton states of a strongly coupled system and demonstrate that their efficient coupling to phonons can be exploited for novel concepts in high-fidelity single photon generation.