• Cold Dark Matter (CDM) is a crucial constituent of the current concordance cosmological model. Having a vanishing equation of state (EoS), its energy density scales with the inverse cosmic volume and is thus uniquely described by a single number, its present abundance. We test the inverse cosmic volume law for Dark Matter (DM) by allowing its EoS to vary independently in eight redshift bins in the range $z=10^5$ and $z=0$. We use the latest measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation from the Planck satellite and supplement them with Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) data from the 6dF and SDSS-III BOSS surveys, and with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) key project data. We find no evidence for nonzero EoS in any of the eight redshift bins. With Planck data alone, the DM abundance is most strongly constrained around matter-radiation equality $\omega^{\rm eq}_g = 0.1193^{+0.0036}_{-0.0035}$ (95% c.l.), whereas its present day value is more weakly constrained $\omega^{(0)}_g = 0.16^{+0.12}_{-0.10}$ (95% c.l.). Adding BAO or HST data does not significantly change the $\omega^{\rm eq}_g$ constraint, while $\omega^{(0)}_g$ tightens to $0.160^{+0.069}_{-0.065} $ (95% c.l.) and $0.124^{+0.081}_{-0.067}$ (95% c.l.) respectively. Our results constrain for the first time the level of "coldness" required of the DM across various cosmological epochs and show that the DM abundance is strictly positive at all times.
  • We demonstrate that the Vlasov equation describing collisionless self-gravitating matter may be solved with the so-called Schr\"odinger method (ScM). With the ScM, one solves the Schr\"odinger-Poisson system of equations for a complex wave function in d dimensions, rather than the Vlasov equation for a 2d-dimensional phase space density. The ScM also allows calculating the d-dimensional cumulants directly through quasi-local manipulations of the wave function, avoiding the complexity of 2d-dimensional phase space. We perform for the first time a quantitive comparison of the ScM and a conventional Vlasov solver in d=2 dimensions. Our numerical tests were carried out using two types of cold cosmological initial conditions: the classic collapse of a sine wave and those of a gaussian random field as commonly used in cosmological cold dark matter N-body simulations. We compare the first three cumulants, that is, the density, velocity and velocity dispersion, to those obtained by solving the Vlasov equation using the publicly available code ColDICE. We find excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement between these codes, demonstrating the feasibility and advantages of the ScM as an alternative to N-body simulations. We discuss, the emergence of effective vorticity in the ScM through the winding number around the points where the wave function vanishes. As an application we evaluate the background pressure induced by the non-linearity of large scale structure formation, thereby estimating the magnitude of cosmological backreaction. We find that it is negligibly small and has time dependence and magnitude compatible with expectations from the effective field theory of large scale structure.
  • We determine the conditions under which a static spherically symmetric spacetime metric is equivalent to a perturbed Friedman-Robertson-Walker metric. We construct the correspondence between the two metrics and discuss a simple application.
  • The maximum size of a cosmic structure is given by the maximum turnaround radius -- the scale where the attraction due to its mass is balanced by the repulsion due to dark energy. We derive generic formulae for the estimation of the maximum turnaround radius in any theory of gravity obeying the Einstein equivalence principle, in two situations: on a spherically symmetric spacetime and on a perturbed Friedman-Robertson-Walker spacetime. We show that the two formulae agree. As an application of our formula, we calculate the maximum turnaround radius in the case of the Brans-Dicke theory of gravity. We find that for this theory, such maximum sizes always lie above the \LCDM value, by a factor $1 + \frac{1}{3\omega}$, where $\omega\gg 1$ is the Brans-Dicke parameter, implying consistency of the theory with current data.
  • A generalization of Bekenstein's Tensor-Vector-Scalar (TeVeS) model of modified gravity has recently been proposed as an alternative to dark matter. This model -- which we will refer to as g-TeVeS -- utilizes a Galileon-induced Vainshtein mechanism to suppress modifications to General Relativity in strong gravity regimes and so avoids the need to introduce the baroque kinetic terms that typically exist in relativistic models of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). We explore the behavior of this model in spacetimes with exact Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) symmetry. The ability of the theory to recover MOND phenomenology places restrictions on the theory's parameter space and it is found that within an estimate of this area of parameter space the theory cannot successfully approximate the Friedmannian cosmological behavior of cold dark matter. It is found that much closer agreement may be recovered in other regions of the theory's parameter space and the reasons for this are discussed.
  • We examine how the properties of dark matter, parameterised by an equation of state parameter $w$ and two perturbative Generalised Dark Matter (GDM) parameters $c^2_s$ (the sound speed) and $c^2_\text{vis}$ (the viscosity), are constrained by existing cosmological data, particularly the Planck 2015 data release. We find that the GDM parameters are consistent with zero, and are strongly constrained, showing no evidence for extending the dark matter model beyond the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) paradigm. The dark matter equation of state is constrained to be within $-0.000896<w<0.00238$ at the $99.7\%$ confidence level, which is several times stronger than constraints found previously using WMAP data. The parameters $c^2_s$ and $c^2_\text{vis}$ are constrained to be less than $3.21\times10^{-6}$ and $6.06\times10^{-6}$ respectively at the $99.7\%$ confidence level. The inclusion of the GDM parameters does significantly affect the error bars on several $\Lambda$CDM parameters, notably the dimensionless dark matter density $\omega_g$ and the derived parameters $\sigma_8$ and $H_0$. This can be partially alleviated with the inclusion of data constraining the expansion history of the universe.
  • The Cold Dark Matter (CDM) model, wherein the dark matter is treated as a pressureless perfect fluid, provides a good fit to galactic and cosmological data. With the advent of precision cosmology, it should be asked whether this simplest model needs to be extended, and whether doing so could improve our understanding of the properties of dark matter. One established parameterisation for generalising the CDM fluid is the Generalised Dark Matter (GDM) model, in which dark matter is an imperfect fluid with pressure and shear viscosity that fulfill certain closure equations. We investigate these closure equations and the three new parametric functions they contain: the background equation of state w, the speed of sound c_s^2 and the viscosity c_{vis}^2. Taking these functions to be constant parameters, we analyse an exact solution of the perturbed Einstein equations in a GDM-dominated universe and discuss the main effects of the three parameters on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Our analysis suggests that the CMB alone is not able to distinguish between the GDM sound speed and viscosity parameters, but that other observables, such as the matter power spectrum, are required to break this degeneracy. We also consider other descriptions of imperfect fluids that have a non-perturbative definition and relate these to the GDM model. In particular, we consider scalar fields, an effective field theory (EFT) of fluids, an EFT of Large Scale Structure, non-equilibrium thermodynamics and tightly-coupled fluids. These descriptions could be used to extend the GDM model into the nonlinear regime of structure formation, which is necessary if the wealth of data available on those scales is to be employed in constraining the model. We also derive the initial conditions for adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations and provide the result in a form ready for implementation in Einstein-Boltzmann solvers.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Light degrees of freedom that modify gravity on cosmological scales must be "screened" on solar system scales in order to be compatible with data. The Vainshtein mechanism achieves this through a breakdown of classical perturbation theory, as large interactions involving new degrees of freedom become important below the so-called Vainshtein radius. We begin to develop an extension of the Parameterized Post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism that is able to handle Vainshteinian corrections. We argue that theories with a unique Vainshtein scale must be expanded using two small parameters. In this Parameterized Post-Newtonian-Vainshteinian (PPNV) expansion, the primary expansion parameter that controls the PPN order is, as usual, the velocity $v$. The secondary expansion parameter, $\alpha$, controls the strength of the Vainshteinian correction and is a theory-specific combination of the Schwarzschild radius and the Vainshtein radius of the source that is independent of its mass. We present the general framework and apply it to Cubic Galileon theory both inside and outside the Vainshtein radius. The PPNV framework can be used to determine the compatibility of such theories with solar system and other strong-field data.
  • The current effort to test General Relativity employs multiple disparate formalisms for different observables, obscuring the relations between laboratory, astrophysical and cosmological constraints. To remedy this situation, we develop a parameter space for comparing tests of gravity on all scales in the universe. In particular, we present new methods for linking cosmological large-scale structure, the Cosmic Microwave Background and gravitational waves with classic PPN tests of gravity. Diagrams of this gravitational parameter space reveal a noticeable untested regime. The untested window, which separates small-scale systems from the troubled cosmological regime, could potentially hide the onset of corrections to General Relativity.
  • The growth rate of the large-scale structure of the universe has been advocated as the observable par excellence for testing gravity on cosmological scales. By considering linear-order deviations from General Relativity, we show that corrections to the growth rate, f, can be expressed as an integral over a `source' term, weighted by a theory-independent `response kernel'. This leads to an efficient and accurate `plug-and-play' expression for generating growth rates in alternative gravity theories, bypassing lengthy theory-specific computations. We use this approach to explicitly show that f is sensitive to a degenerate combination of modified expansion and modified clustering effects. Hence the growth rate, when used in isolation, is not a straightforward diagnostic of modified gravity.
  • We propose a completely new parametrisation of the dark energy equation of state, which uses the dark energy density, $\Omega_e$ as a cosmic clock. We expand the equation of state in a series of orthogonal polynomials, with $\Omega_e$ as the expansion parameter and determine the expansion coefficients by fitting to SNIa and $H(z)$ data. Assuming that $\Omega_e$ is a monotonic function of time, we show that our parametrisation performs better than the popular Chevallier--Polarski--Linder (CPL) and Gerke and Efstathiou (GE) parametrisations, and we demonstrate that it is robust to the choice of prior. Expanding in orthogonal polynomials allows us to relate models of dark energy directly to our parametrisation, which we illustrate by placing constraints on the expansion coefficients extracted from two popular quintessence models. Finally, we comment on how this parametrisation could be modified to accommodate high redshift data, where any non--monotonicity of $\Omega_e$ would need to be accounted for.
  • A unified framework for theories of modified gravity will be an essential tool for interpreting the forthcoming deluge of cosmological data. We present such a formalism, the Parameterized Post-Friedmann framework (PPF), which parameterizes the cosmological perturbation theory of a wide variety of modified gravity models. PPF is able to handle spin-0 degrees of freedom from new scalar, vector and tensor fields, meaning that it is not restricted to simple models based solely on cosmological scalar fields. A direct correspondence is maintained between the parameterization and the underlying space of theories, which allows us to build up a `dictionary' of modified gravity theories and their PPF correspondences. In this paper we describe the construction of the parameterization and demonstrate its use through a number of worked examples relevant to the current literature. We indicate how the formalism will be implemented numerically, so that the dictionary of modified gravity can be pitted against forthcoming observations.
  • There are a number of approaches to testing General Relativity (GR) on linear scales using parameterized frameworks for modifying cosmological perturbation theory. It is sometimes assumed that the details of any given parameterization are unimportant if one uses it as a diagnostic for deviations from GR. In this brief report we argue that this is not necessarily so. First we show that adopting alternative combinations of modifications to the field equations significantly changes the constraints that one obtains. In addition, we show that using a parameterization with insufficient freedom significantly tightens the apparent theoretical constraints. Fundamentally we argue that it is almost never appropriate to consider modifications to the perturbed Einstein equations as being constraints on the effective gravitational constant, for example, in the same sense that solar system constraints are. The only consistent modifications are either those that grant near-total freedom, as in decomposition methods, or ones which map directly to a particular part of theory space.
  • In this review we present a thoroughly comprehensive survey of recent work on modified theories of gravity and their cosmological consequences. Amongst other things, we cover General Relativity, Scalar-Tensor, Einstein-Aether, and Bimetric theories, as well as TeVeS, f(R), general higher-order theories, Horava-Lifschitz gravity, Galileons, Ghost Condensates, and models of extra dimensions including Kaluza-Klein, Randall-Sundrum, DGP, and higher co-dimension braneworlds. We also review attempts to construct a Parameterised Post-Friedmannian formalism, that can be used to constrain deviations from General Relativity in cosmology, and that is suitable for comparison with data on the largest scales. These subjects have been intensively studied over the past decade, largely motivated by rapid progress in the field of observational cosmology that now allows, for the first time, precision tests of fundamental physics on the scale of the observable Universe. The purpose of this review is to provide a reference tool for researchers and students in cosmology and gravitational physics, as well as a self-contained, comprehensive and up-to-date introduction to the subject as a whole.
  • There is a distinct possibility that current and future cosmological data can be used to constrain Einstein's theory of gravity on the very largest scales. To be able to do this in a model-independent way, it makes sense to work with a general parameterization of modified gravity. Such an approach would be analogous to the Parameterized Post-Newtonian (PPN) approach which is used on the scale of the Solar System. A few such parameterizations have been proposed and preliminary constraints have been obtained. We show that the majority of such parameterizations are only exactly applicable in the quasistatic regime. On larger scales they fail to encapsulate the full behaviour of typical models currently under consideration. We suggest that it may be possible to capture the additions to the `Parameterized Post-Friedmann' (PPF) formalism by treating them akin to fluid perturbations.
  • We consider the post-Newtonian limit of a general class of bimetric theories of gravity, in which both metrics are dynamical. The established parameterised post-Newtonian approach is followed as closely as possible, although new potentials are found that do not exist within the standard frame-work. It is found that these theories can evade solar system tests of post-Newtonian gravity remarkably well. We show that perturbations about Minkowski space in these theories contain both massless and massive degrees of freedom, and that in general there are two different types of massive mode, each with a different mass parameter. If both of these masses are sufficiently large then the predictions of the most general class of theories we consider are indistinguishable from those of general relativity, up to post-Newtonian order in a weak field, low velocity expansion. In the limit that the massive modes become massless, we find that these general theories do not exhibit a van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov-like discontinuity in their gamma parameter, although there are discontinuities in other post-Newtonian parameters as the massless limit is approached. This smooth behaviour in gamma is due to the discontinuities from each of the two different massive modes cancelling each other out. Such cancellations cannot occur in special cases with only one massive mode, such as the Isham-Salam-Strathdee theory.
  • We show that a class of bi-gravity theories contain solutions describing dark matter. A particular member of this class is also shown to be equivalent to the Eddington-Born-Infeld gravity, recently proposed as a candidate for dark matter. Bigravity theories also have cosmological de Sitter backgrounds and we find solutions interpolating between matter and acceleration eras.
  • It has been argued that a Universe governed by Eddington-Born-Infeld gravity can be compatible with current cosmological constraints. The extra fields introduced in this theory can behave both as dark matter and dark energy, unifying the dark sector in one coherent framework. We show the various roles the extra fields can play in the expansion of the Universe and study the evolution of linear perturbations in the various regimes. We find that, as a unified theory of the dark sector, Eddington-Born-Infeld gravity will lead to excessive fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background on large scales. In the presence of a cosmological constant, however, the extra fields can behave as a form of non-particulate dark matter and can lead to a cosmology which is entirely compatible with current observations of large scale structure. We discuss the interpretation of this form of dark matter and how it can differ from standard, particulate dark matter.
  • Over the last few decades, astronomers and cosmologists have accumulated vast amounts of data clearly demonstrating that our current theories of fundamental particles and of gravity are inadequate to explain the observed discrepancy between the dynamics and the distribution of the visible matter in the Universe. The Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) proposal aims at solving the problem by postulating that Newton's second law of motion is modified for accelerations smaller than ~10^{-10}m/s^2. This simple amendment, has had tremendous success in explaining galactic rotation curves. However, being non-relativistic, it cannot make firm predictions for cosmology. A relativistic theory called Tensor-Vector-Scalar (TeVeS) has been proposed by Bekenstein building on earlier work of Sanders which has a MOND limit for non-relativistic systems. In this article I give a short introduction to TeVeS theory and focus on its predictions for cosmology as well as some non-cosmological studies.
  • We show that models of new particle physics containing massless pseudoscalar fields super-weakly coupled to photons can be very efficiently probed with CMB polarization anisotropies. The stochastic pseudoscalar fluctuations generated during inflation provide a mechanism for converting E-mode polarization to B-mode during photon propagation from the surface of last scattering. The efficiency of this conversion process is controlled by the dimensionless ratio H/(2\pi f_a), where H is the Hubble scale during inflation, and f_a^{-1} is the strength of the pseudoscalar coupling to photons. The current observational limits on the B-mode constrain this ratio to be less than 0.07, which in many models of inflation translates to a sensitivity to values of f_a in excess of 10^{14} GeV, surpassing the sensitivity of other tests.
  • General Relativity (GR) is a phenomenologically successful theory that rests on firm foundations, but has not been tested on cosmological scales. The advent of dark energy (and possibly even the requirement of cold dark matter), has increased the need for testing modifications to GR, as the inference of such otherwise undetected fluids, depends crucially on the theory of gravity. In this work I outline a general scheme for constructing consistent and covariant modifications to the Einstein equations. This framework is such that there is a clear connection between the modification and the underlying field content that produces it. I conclude by a simple metric based modification of the fluctuation equations for which the background is exact Lambda-CDM and present its impact on observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation.
  • I consider an extented version of Bekenstein's Tensor-Vector-Scalar theory where the action of the vector field is of a general Einstein-Ether form. This work presents the cosmological equations of this theory, both at the background and perturbed level, for scalar, vector and tensor perturbation modes. By solving the background equations in the radiation era analytically, to an excellent approximation, I construct the primordial adiabatic perturbation for a general family of scalar field kinetic functions.
  • A relativistic theory of gravity has recently been proposed by Bekenstein, where gravity is mediated by a tensor, a vector and a scalar field, thus called TeVeS. The theory aims at modifying gravity in such a way as to reproduce Milgrom's MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) in the weak field, non-relativistic limit, which provides a framework to solve the missing mass problem in galaxies without invoking dark matter. In this paper I apply a covariant approach to formulate the cosmological equations for this theory, for both the background and linear perturbations. I derive the necessary perturbed equations for scalar, vector and tensor modes without adhering to a particular gauge. Special gauges are considered in the appendix.