• We present evidence from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey of chemically separated, kinematically distinct disc components in the solar neighbourhood. We apply probabilistic chemical selection criteria to separate our sample into $\alpha$-low (`thin disc') and $\alpha$-high (`thick disc') sequences. Using newly derived distances, which will be utilized in the upcoming RAVE DR5, we explore the kinematic trends as a function of metallicity for each of the disc components. For our $\alpha$-low disc, we find a negative trend in the mean rotational velocity ($V_{\mathrm{\phi}}$) as a function of iron abundance ([Fe/H]). We measure a positive gradient $\partial V_{\mathrm{\phi}}$/$\partial$[Fe/H] for the $\alpha$-high disc, consistent with results from high-resolution surveys. We also find differences between the $\alpha$-low and $\alpha$-high discs in all three components of velocity dispersion. We discuss the implications of an $\alpha$-low, metal-rich population originating from the inner Galaxy, where the orbits of these stars have been significantly altered by radial mixing mechanisms in order to bring them into the solar neighbourhood. The probabilistic separation we propose can be extended to other data sets for which the accuracy in [$\alpha$/Fe] is not sufficient to disentangle the chemical disc components a priori. For such datasets which will also have significant overlap with Gaia DR1, we can therefore make full use of the improved parallax and proper motion data as it becomes available to investigate kinematic trends in these chemical disc components.
  • The globular cluster H4, located in the center of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy, is crucial for understanding the formation and chemical evolution of star clusters in low-mass galactic environments. H4 is peculiar because the cluster is significantly more metal-rich than the galaxy's other clusters, is located near the galaxy center, and may also be the youngest cluster in the galaxy. In this study, we present detailed chemical abundances derived from high-resolution (R~28000) spectroscopy of an isolated H4 member star for comparison with a sample of 22 nearby Fornax field stars. We find the H4 member to be depleted in the alpha-elements Si, Ca, and Ti with [Si/Fe]=-0.35+-0.34, [Ca/Fe]=+0.05+-0.08, and [Ti/Fe]=-0.27+-0.23, resulting in an average [alpha/Fe]=-0.19+-0.14. If this result is representative of the average cluster properties, H4 is the only known system with a low [alpha/Fe] ratio and a moderately low metallicity embedded in an intact birth environment. For the field stars we find a clear sequence, seen as an early depletion in [alpha/Fe] at low metallicities, in good agreement with previous measurements. H4 falls on top of the observed field star [alpha/Fe] sequence and clearly disagrees with the properties of Milky Way halo stars. We therefore conclude that within a galaxy, the chemical enrichment of globular clusters may be closely linked to the enrichment pattern of the field star population. The low [alpha/Fe] ratios of H4 and similar metallicity field stars in Fornax give evidence that slow chemical enrichment environments, such as dwarf galaxies, may be the original hosts of alpha-depleted clusters in the halos of the Milky Way and M31.
  • Galactic Archaeology, i.e. the use of chemo-dynamical information for stellar samples covering large portions of the Milky Way to infer the dominant processes involved in its formation and evolution, is now a powerful method thanks to the large recently completed and ongoing spectroscopic surveys. It is now important to ask the right questions when analyzing and interpreting the information contained in these rich datasets. To this aim, we have developed a chemodynamical model for the Milky Way that provides quantitative predictions to be compared with the chemo-kinematical properties extracted from the stellar spectra. Three key parameters are needed to make the comparison between data and model predictions useful in order to advance in the field, namely: precise proper-motions, distances and ages. The uncertainties involved in the estimate of ages and distances for field stars are currently the main obstacles in the Galactic Archaeology method. Two important developments might change this situation in the near future: asteroseismology and the now launched Gaia. When combined with the large datasets from surveys like RAVE, SEGUE, LAMOST, Gaia-ESO, APOGEE , HERMES and the future 4MOST we will have the basic ingredients for the reconstruction of the MW history in hands. In the light of these observational advances, the development of detailed chemo-dynamical models tailored to the Milky Way is urgently needed in the field. Here we show the steps we have taken, both in terms of data analysis and modelling. The examples shown here illustrate how powerful can the Galactic Archaeology method become once ages and distances are known with better precision than what is currently feasible.
  • We present alpha-element abundances of Mg, Si, and Ti for a large sample of field stars in two outer fields of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph), obtained with VLT/GIRAFFE (R~16,000). Due to the large fraction of metal-poor stars in our sample, we are able to follow the alpha-element evolution from [Fe/H]=-2.5 continuously to [Fe/H]=-0.7 dex. For the first time we are able to resolve the turnover from the Type II supernovae (SNe) dominated, alpha-enhanced plateau down to subsolar [alpha/Fe] values due to the onset of SNe Ia, and thus to trace the chemical enrichment efficiency of the galaxy. Our data support the general concept of an alpha-enhanced plateau at early epochs, followed by a well-defined "knee", caused by the onset of SNe Ia, and finally a second plateau with sub-solar [alpha/Fe] values. We find the position of this knee to be at [Fe/H]=-1.9 and therefore significantly more metal-poor than expected from comparison with other dSphs and standard evolutionary models. Surprisingly, this value is rather comparable to the knee in Sculptor, a dSph about 10 times less luminous than Fornax. Using chemical evolution models, we find that both the position of the knee as well as the subsequent plateau at sub-solar level can hardly be explained unless the galaxy experienced several discrete star formation events with a drastic variation in star formation efficiency, while a uniform star formation can be ruled out. One possible evolutionary scenario is that Fornax experienced one or several major accretion events from gas-rich systems in the past, so that its current stellar mass is not indicative of the chemical evolution environment at ancient times. If Fornax is the product of several smaller building blocks, this may also have implications of the understanding on the formation process of dSphs in general.
  • The 4MOST consortium is currently halfway through a Conceptual Design study for ESO with the aim to develop a wide-field (>3 square degree, goal >5 square degree), high-multiplex (>1500 fibres, goal 3000 fibres) spectroscopic survey facility for an ESO 4m-class telescope (VISTA). 4MOST will run permanently on the telescope to perform a 5 year public survey yielding more than 20 million spectra at resolution R~5000 ({\lambda}=390-1000 nm) and more than 2 million spectra at R~20,000 (395-456.5 nm & 587-673 nm). The 4MOST design is especially intended to complement three key all-sky, space-based observatories of prime European interest: Gaia, eROSITA and Euclid. Initial design and performance estimates for the wide-field corrector concepts are presented. We consider two fibre positioner concepts, a well-known Phi-Theta system and a new R-Theta concept with a large patrol area. The spectrographs are fixed configuration two-arm spectrographs, with dedicated spectrographs for the high- and low-resolution. A full facility simulator is being developed to guide trade-off decisions regarding the optimal field-of-view, number of fibres needed, and the relative fraction of high-to-low resolution fibres. Mock catalogues with template spectra from seven Design Reference Surveys are simulated to verify the science requirements of 4MOST. The 4MOST consortium aims to deliver the full 4MOST facility by the end of 2018 and start delivering high-level data products for both consortium and ESO community targets a year later with yearly increments.