• We recently discovered a yellow supergiant (YSG) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with a heliocentric radial velocity of ~300 km/s which is much larger than expected for a star in its location in the SMC. This is the first runaway YSG ever discovered and only the second evolved runaway star discovered in a different galaxy than the Milky Way. We classify the star as G5-8I, and use de-reddened broad-band colors with model atmospheres to determine an effective temperature of 4700+/-250K, consistent with what is expected from its spectral type. The star's luminosity is then L/Lo ~ 4.2+/-0.1, consistent with it being a ~30Myr 9Mo star according to the Geneva evolution models. The star is currently located in the outer portion of the SMC's body, but if the star's transverse peculiar velocity is similar to its peculiar radial velocity, in 10Myr the star would have moved 1.6 degrees across the disk of the SMC, and could easily have been born in one of the SMC's star-forming regions. Based on its large radial velocity, we suggest it originated in a binary system where the primary exploded as a supernovae thus flinging the runaway star out into space. Such stars may provide an important mechanism for the dispersal of heavier elements in galaxies given the large percentage of massive stars that are runaways. In the future we hope to look into additional evolved runaway stars that were discovered as part of our other past surveys.
  • Massive stars have a strong impact on their surroundings, in particular when they produce a core-collapse supernova at the end of their evolution. In these proceedings, we review the general evolution of massive stars and their properties at collapse as well as the transition between massive and intermediate-mass stars. We also summarise the effects of metallicity and rotation. We then discuss some of the major uncertainties in the modelling of massive stars, with a particular emphasis on the treatment of convection in 1D stellar evolution codes. Finally, we present new 3D hydrodynamic simulations of convection in carbon burning and list key points to take from 3D hydrodynamic studies for the development of new prescriptions for convective boundary mixing in 1D stellar evolution codes.
  • Be stars are main-sequence massive stars with emission features in their spectrum, which originates in circumstellar gaseous discs. Even though the viscous decretion disc (VDD) model can satisfactorily explain most observations, two important physical ingredients, namely the magnitude of the viscosity ($\alpha$) and the disk mass injection rate, remain poorly constrained. The light curves of Be stars that undergo events of disc formation and dissipation offer an opportunity to constrain these quantities. A pipeline was developed to model these events that uses a grid of synthetic light curves, computed from coupled hydrodynamic and radiative transfer calculations. A sample of 54 Be stars from the OGLE survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was selected for this study. Because of the way our sample was selected (bright stars with clear disc events), it likely represents the densest discs in the SMC. Like their siblings in the Galaxy, the mass of the disc in the SMC increases with the stellar mass. The typical mass and angular momentum loss rates associated with the disk events are of the order of $\sim$$10^{-10}\, M_\odot\,\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ and $\sim$$5\times 10^{36}\, \mathrm{g\, cm^{2}\, s^{-2}}$, respectively. The values of $\alpha$ found in this work are typically of a few tenths, consistent with recent results in the literature and with the ones found in dwarf novae, but larger than current theory predicts. Considering the sample as a whole, the viscosity parameter is roughly two times larger at build-up ($\left\langle\alpha_\mathrm{bu}\right\rangle = 0.63$) than at dissipation ($\left\langle\alpha_\mathrm{d}\right\rangle = 0.26$). Further work is necessary to verify whether this trend is real or a result of some of the model assumptions.
  • In the context of the high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio, high sensitivity, spectropolarimetric survey BritePol, which complements observations by the BRITE constellation of nanosatellites for asteroseismology, we are looking for and measuring the magnetic field of all stars brighter than V=4. In this paper, we present circularly polarised spectra obtained with HarpsPol at ESO in La Silla (Chile) and ESPaDOnS at CFHT (Hawaii) for 3 hot evolved stars: $\iota$ Car, HR 3890, and $\epsilon$ CMa. We detected a magnetic field in all 3 stars. Each star has been observed several times to confirm the magnetic detections and check for variability. The stellar parameters of the 3 objects were determined and their evolutionary status was ascertained employing evolution models computed with the Geneva code. $\epsilon$ CMa was already known and is confirmed to be magnetic, but our modeling indicates that it is located near the end of the main sequence, i.e. it is still in a core hydrogen burning phase. $\iota$ Car and HR 3890 are the first discoveries of magnetic hot supergiants located well after the end of the main sequence on the HR diagram. These stars are probably the descendants of main sequence magnetic massive stars. Their current field strength (a few G) is compatible with magnetic flux conservation during stellar evolution. These results provide observational constraints for the development of future evolutionary models of hot stars including a fossil magnetic field.
  • Aims: Past observations of fast-rotating massive stars exhibiting normal nitrogen abundances at their surface have raised questions about the rotational mixing paradigm. We revisit this question thanks to a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of bright fast-rotating OB stars, with the goal of quantifying the efficiency of rotational mixing at high rotation rates. Method: Our sample consists of 40 fast rotators on the main sequence, with spectral types comprised between B0.5 and O4. We compare the abundances of some key element indicators of mixing (He, CNO) with the predictions of evolutionary models for single objects and for stars in interacting binary systems. Results: The properties of half of the sample stars can be reproduced by single evolutionary models, even in the case of probable or confirmed binaries that can therefore be true single stars in a pre-interaction configuration. The main problem for the rest of the sample is a mismatch for the [N/O] abundance ratio (we confirm the existence of fast rotators with a lack of nitrogen enrichment) and/or a high helium abundance that cannot be accounted for by models. Modifying the diffusion coefficient implemented in single- star models does not solve the problem as it cannot simultaneously reproduce the helium abundances and [N/O] abundance ratios of our targets. Since part of them actually are binaries, we also compared their chemical properties with predictions for post-mass transfer systems. We found that these models can explain the abundances measured for a majority of our targets, including some of the most helium-enriched, but fail to reproduce them in other cases. Our study thus reveals that some physical ingredients are still missing in current models.
  • We present the first detailed three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic implicit large eddy simulations of turbulent convection of carbon burning in massive stars. Simulations begin with radial profiles mapped from a carbon burning shell within a 15$\,\textrm{M}_\odot$ one-dimensional stellar evolution model. We consider models with $128^3$, $256^3$, $512^3$ and $1024^3$ zones. The turbulent flow properties of these carbon burning simulations are very similar to the oxygen burning case. We performed a mean field analysis of the kinetic energy budgets within the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes framework. For the upper convective boundary region, we find that the numerical dissipation is insensitive to resolution for linear mesh resolutions above 512 grid points. For the stiffer, more stratified lower boundary, our highest resolution model still shows signs of decreasing sub-grid dissipation suggesting it is not yet numerically converged. We find that the widths of the upper and lower boundaries are roughly 30% and 10% of the local pressure scale heights, respectively. The shape of the boundaries is significantly different from those used in stellar evolution models. As in past oxygen-shell burning simulations, we observe entrainment at both boundaries in our carbon-shell burning simulations. In the large P\'eclet number regime found in the advanced phases, the entrainment rate is roughly inversely proportional to the bulk Richardson number, Ri$_{\rm B}$ ($\propto $Ri${\rm_B}^{-\alpha}$, $0.5\lesssim \alpha \lesssim 1.0$). We thus suggest the use of Ri$_{\rm B}$ as a means to take into account the results of 3D hydrodynamics simulations in new 1D prescriptions of convective boundary mixing.
  • Context. CEMP-no stars are long-lived low-mass stars with a very low iron content, overabundances of carbon and no or minor signs for the presence of s- or r-elements. Although their origin is still a matter of debate, they are often considered as being made of a material ejected by a previous stellar generation (source stars). Aims. We place constraints on the source stars from the observed abundance data of CEMP-no stars. Methods. We computed source star models of 20, 32, and 60 M$_{\odot}$ at Z = 10$^{-5}$ with and without fast rotation. For each model we also computed a case with a late mixing event occurring between the hydrogen and helium-burning shell $\sim$ 200 yr before the end of the evolution. This creates a partially CNO-processed zone in the source star. We use the 12C/13C and C/N ratios observed on CEMP-no stars to put constraints on the possible source stars (mass, late mixing or not). Then, we inspect more closely the abundance data of six CEMP-no stars and select their preferred source star(s). Results. Four out of the six CEMP-no stars studied cannot be explained without the late mixing process in the source star. Two of them show nucleosynthetic signatures of a progressive mixing (due e.g. to rotation) in the source star. We also show that a 20 M$_{\odot}$ source star is preferred compared to one of 60 M$_{\odot}$ and that likely only the outer layers of the source stars were expelled to reproduce the observed 12C/13C. Conclusions. The results suggest that (1) a late mixing process could operate in some source stars, (2) a progressive mixing, possibly achieved by fast rotation, is at work in several source stars, (3) $\sim$ 20 M$_{\odot}$ source stars are preferred compared to $\sim$ 60 M$_{\odot}$ ones, and (4) the source star might have preferentially experienced a low energetic supernova with large fallback.
  • The surface rotations of some red giants are so fast that they must have been spun up by tidal interaction with a close companion, either another star, a brown dwarf, or a planet. We focus here on the case of red giants that are spun up by tidal interaction with a planet. When the distance between the planet and the star decreases, the spin period of the star decreases, the orbital period of the planet decreases, and the reflex motion of the star increases. We study the change rate of these three quantities when the circular orbit of a planet of 15 M$_{J}$ that initially orbits a 2 M$_\odot$ star at 1 au shrinks under the action of tidal forces during the red giant phase. We use stellar evolution models coupled with computations of the orbital evolution of the planet, which allows us to follow the exchanges of angular momentum between the star and the orbit in a consistent way. We obtain that the reflex motion of the red giant star increases by more than 1 m s$^{-1}$ per year in the last $\sim$40 years before the planet engulfment. During this phase, the reflex motion of the star is between 660 and 710 m s$^{-1}$. The spin period of the star increases by more than about 10 minutes per year in the last 3000 y before engulfment. During this period, the spin period of the star is shorter than 0.7 year. During this same period, the variation in orbital period, which is shorter than 0.18 year, is on the same order of magnitude. Changes in reflex-motion and spin velocities are very small and thus most likely out of reach of being observed. The most promising way of detecting this effect is through observations of transiting planets, that is, through{\it } changes of the beginning or end of the transit. A space mission like PLATO might be of great interest for detecting planets that are on the verge of being engulfed by red giants.
  • The treatment of mixing processes is still one of the major uncertainties in 1D stellar evolution models. This is mostly due to the need to parametrize and approximate aspects of hydrodynamics in hydrostatic codes. In particular, the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities in rotating stars, for example, dynamical shear instability, evades consistent description. We intend to study the accuracy of the diffusion approximation to dynamical shear in hydrostatic stellar evolution models by comparing 1D models to a first-principle hydrodynamics simulation starting from the same initial conditions. We chose an initial model calculated with the stellar evolution code GENEC that is just at the onset of a dynamical shear instability but does not show any other instabilities (e.g., convection). This was mapped to the hydrodynamics code SLH to perform a 2D simulation in the equatorial plane. We compare the resulting profiles in the two codes and compute an effective diffusion coefficient for the hydro simulation. Shear instabilities develop in the 2D simulation in the regions predicted by linear theory to become unstable in the 1D model. Angular velocity and chemical composition is redistributed in the unstable region, thereby creating new unstable regions. Eventually the 2D simulation settles in a symmetric, steady state, which is Richardson stable everywhere, whereas the instability remains for longer in the 1D model due to current limitations in the 1D code. A spatially resolved diffusion coefficient is extracted by comparing the initial and final profiles of mean atomic mass. The presented simulation gives a first insight on hydrodynamics of shear instabilities in a real stellar environment and even allows us to directly extract an effective diffusion coefficient. We see evidence for a critical Richardson number of 0.25 as regions above this value remain stable for the course of the simulation.
  • We give a brief overview of where we stand with respect to some old and new questions bearing on how massive stars evolve and end their lifetime. We focus on the following key points that are further discussed by other contributions during this conference: convection, mass losses, rotation, magnetic field and multiplicity. For purpose of clarity, each of these processes are discussed on its own but we have to keep in mind that they are all interacting between them offering a large variety of outputs, some of them still to be discovered.
  • Classical Cepheid variable stars are both sensitive astrophysical laboratories and accurate cosmic distance tracers. We have recently investigated how the evolutionary effects of rotation impact the properties of these important stars and here provide an accessible overview of some key elements as well as two important consequences. Firstly, rotation resolves the long-standing Cepheid mass discrepancy problem. Second, rotation increases main sequence lifetimes, i.e, Cepheids are approximately twice as old as previously thought. Finally, we highlight the importance of the short-period ends of Cepheid period distributions as indicators for model adequacy.
  • Over the last decade, tremendous strides have been achieved in our understanding of magnetism in main sequence hot stars. In particular, the statistical occurrence of their surface magnetism has been established (~10%) and the field origin is now understood to be fossil. However, fundamental questions remain: how do these fossil fields evolve during the post-main sequence phases, and how do they influence the evolution of hot stars from the main sequence to their ultimate demise? Filling the void of known magnetic evolved hot (OBA) stars, studying the evolution of their fossil magnetic fields along stellar evolution, and understanding the impact of these fields on the angular momentum, rotation, mass loss, and evolution of the star itself, is crucial to answering these questions, with far reaching consequences, in particular for the properties of the precursors of supernovae explosions and stellar remnants. In the framework of the BRITE spectropolarimetric survey and LIFE project, we have discovered the first few magnetic hot supergiants. Their longitudinal surface magnetic field is very weak but their configuration resembles those of main sequence hot stars. We present these first observational results and propose to interpret them at first order in the context of magnetic flux conservation as the radius of the star expands with evolution. We then also consider the possible impact of stellar structure changes along evolution.
  • Near-solar metallicity (and low-redshift) Pair-Instability Supernova (PISN) candidates challenge stellar evolution models. Indeed, at such a metallicity, even an initially very massive star generally loses so much mass by stellar winds that it will avoid the electron-positron pair-creation instability. We use recent results showing that a magnetic field at the surface of a massive star can significantly reduce its effective mass-loss rate to compute magnetic models of very massive stars (VMSs) at solar metallicity and explore the possibility that such stars end as PISNe. We implement the quenching of the mass loss produced by a surface dipolar magnetic field into the Geneva stellar evolution code and compute new stellar models with an initial mass of $200\,M_\odot$ at solar metallicity, with and without rotation. It considerably reduces the total amount of mass lost by the star during its life. For the non-rotating model, the total (CO-core) mass of the models is $72.8\,M_\odot$ ($70.1\,M_\odot$) at the onset of the electron-positron pair-creation instability. For the rotating model, we obtain $65.6\,M_\odot$ ($62.4\,M\odot$). In both cases, a significant fraction of the internal mass lies in the region where pair instability occurs in the $\log(T)-\log(\rho)$ plane. The interaction of the reduced mass loss with the magnetic field efficiently brakes the surface of the rotating model, producing a strong shear and hence a very efficient mixing that makes the star evolve nearly homogeneously. The core characteristics of our models indicate that solar metallicity models of magnetic VMSs may evolve to PISNe (and pulsation PISNe).
  • The modelling of massive star evolution is a complex task, and is very sensitive to the way physical processes (such as convection, rotation, mass loss, etc.) are included in stellar evolution code. Moreover, the very high observed fraction of binary systems among massive stars makes the comparison with observations difficult. In this paper, we focus on discussing the uncertainties linked to the modelling of convection and rotation in single massive stars.
  • In this paper, we discuss some consequences of rotation and mass loss on the evolved stages of massive star evolution. The physical reasons of the time evolution of the surface velocity are explained, and then we show how the late-time evolution of massive stars are impacted in combination with the effects of mass loss. The most interesting result is that in some cases, a massive star can have a blue-red-blue evolution, opening the possibility that Blue Supergiants are composed by two distinct populations of stars: one just leaving the main sequence and crossing the HRD for the first time, and the other one evolving back to the blue side of the HRD after a Red Supergiant phase. We discuss a few possible observational tests that can allow to distinguish these two populations, and how supergiant B[e] stars fit in this context.
  • Context. Red-giant stars may engulf planets. This may increase the rotation rate of their convective envelope, which could lead to strong dynamo-triggered magnetic fields. Aims. We explore the possibility of generating magnetic fields in red giants that have gone through the process of a planet engulfment. We compare them with similar models that evolve without any planets. We discuss the impact of stellar wind magnetic braking on the evolution of the surface velocity of the parent star. Methods. With rotating stellar models with and without planets and an empirical relation between the Rossby number and the surface magnetic field, we deduce the evolution of the surface magnetic field along the red-giant branch. The effects of wind magnetic braking is explored using a relation deduced from MHD simulations. Results. The stellar evolution model of a 1.7 M$_\odot$ without planet engulfment and that has a time-averaged rotation velocity during the Main-Sequence equal to 100 km s$^{-1}$, shows a surface magnetic field triggered by convection larger than 10 G only at the base of the red giant branch, that means for gravities log $g > 3$. When a planet engulfment occurs, such magnetic field can also appear at much lower gravities, i.e. at much higher luminosities along the red giant branch. Typically the engulfment of a 15 M$_J$ planet produces a dynamo triggered magnetic field larger than 10 G for gravities between 2.5 and 1.9. We show that for reasonable wind magnetic braking laws, the high surface velocity reached after a planet engulfment may be maintained sufficiently long for being observable. Conclusions. High surface magnetic fields for red giants in the upper part of the red giant branch is a strong indication of a planet engulfment or of an interaction with a companion. Our theory can be tested by observing fast rotating red giants and check whether they show magnetic fields.
  • Classical Cepheid variable stars are high-sensitivity probes of stellar evolution and fundamental tracers of cosmic distances. While rotational mixing significantly affects the evolution of Cepheid progenitors (intermediate-mass stars), the impact of the resulting changes in stellar structure and composition on Cepheids on their pulsational properties is hitherto unknown. Here we present the first detailed pulsational instability analysis of stellar evolution models that include the effects of rotation, for both fundamental mode and first overtone pulsation. We employ Geneva evolution models spanning a three-dimensional grid in mass (1.7 - 15 $M_\odot$), metallicity (Z = 0.014, 0.006, 0.002), and rotation (non-rotating, average & fast rotation). We determine (1) hot and cool instability strip (IS) boundaries taking into account the coupling between convection and pulsation, (2) pulsation periods, and (3) rates of period change. We investigate relations between period and (a) luminosity, (b) age, (c) radius, (d) temperature, (e) rate of period change, (f) mass, (g) the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relation (FWGLR). We confront all predictions aside from those for age with observations, finding generally excellent agreement. We tabulate period-luminosity relations (PLRs) for several photometric pass-bands and investigate how the finite IS width, different IS crossings, metallicity, and rotation affect PLRs. We show that a Wesenheit index based on H, V, and I photometry is expected to have the smallest intrinsic PLR dispersion. We confirm that rotation resolves the Cepheid mass discrepancy. Period-age relations depend significantly on rotation (rotation increases Cepheid ages), offering a straightforward explanation for evolved stars in binary systems that cannot be matched by conventional isochrones assuming a single age. Finally, we show that Cepheids obey a tight FWGLR.
  • Stellar evolution models of massive stars are important for many areas of astrophysics, for example nucleosynthesis yields, supernova progenitor models and understanding physics under extreme conditions. Turbulence occurs in stars primarily due to nuclear burning at different mass coordinates within the star. The understanding and correct treatment of turbulence and turbulent mixing at convective boundaries in stellar models has been studied for decades but still lacks a definitive solution. This paper presents initial results of a study on convective boundary mixing (CBM) in massive stars. The 'stiffness' of a convective boundary can be quantified using the bulk Richardson number ($\textrm{Ri}_B$), the ratio of the potential energy for restoration of the boundary to the kinetic energy of turbulent eddies. A 'stiff' boundary ($\textrm{Ri}_B \sim 10^4$) will suppress CBM, whereas in the opposite case a 'soft' boundary ($\textrm{Ri}_B \sim 10$) will be more susceptible to CBM. One of the key results obtained so far is that lower convective boundaries (closer to the centre) of nuclear burning shells are 'stiffer' than the corresponding upper boundaries, implying limited CBM at lower shell boundaries. This is in agreement with 3D hydrodynamic simulations carried out by Meakin and Arnett [The Astrophysical Journal 667:448-475, 2007]. This result also has implications for new CBM prescriptions in massive stars as well as for nuclear burning flame front propagation in Super-Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and also the onset of novae.
  • After a brief recall of the main impacts of stellar rotation on the structure and the evolution of stars, four topics are addressed: 1) the links between magnetic fields and rotation; 2) the impact of rotation on the age determination of clusters; 3) the exchanges of angular momentum between the orbit of a planet and the star due to tides; 4) the impact of rotation on the early chemical evolution of the Milky Way and the origin of the Carbon-Enhanced-Metal-Poor stars.
  • Rotation was shown to have a strong impact on the structure and light element nucleosynthesis in massive stars. In particular, models including rotation can reproduce the primary nitrogen observed in halo extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. Additional exploratory models showed that rotation may enhance $s$-process production at low metallicity. Here we present a large grid of massive star models including rotation and a full $s$-process network to study the impact of rotation on the weak $s$-process. We explore the possibility of producing significant amounts of elements beyond the strontium peak, which is where the weak $s$-process usually stops. We used the Geneva stellar evolution code coupled to an enlarged reaction network with 737 nuclear species up to bismuth to calculate $15-40\,\text{M}_\odot$ models at four metallicities ($Z = 0.014,10^{-3}$, $10^{-5}$, and $10^{-7}$) from the main sequence up to the end of oxygen burning. We confirm that rotation-induced mixing between the convective H-shell and He-core enables an important production of primary $^{14}$N and $^{22}$Ne and $s$-process at low metallicity. At low metallicity, even though the production is still limited by the initial number of iron seeds, rotation enhances the $s$-process production, even for isotopes heavier than strontium, by increasing the neutron to seed ratio. The increase in this ratio is a direct consequence of the primary production of $^{22}$Ne. Despite nuclear uncertainties affecting the $s$-process production and stellar uncertainties affecting the rotation-induced mixing, our results show a robust production of $s$ process at low metallicity when rotation is taken into account. Considering models with a distribution of initial rotation rates enables to reproduce the observed large range of the [Sr/Ba] ratios in (carbon-enhanced and normal) EMP stars.
  • During the last few years, the Geneva stellar evolution group has released new grids of stellar models, including the effect of rotation and with updated physical inputs (Ekstr\"om et al. 2012; Georgy et al. 2013a,b). To ease the comparison between the outputs of the stellar evolution computations and the observations, a dedicated tool was developed: the Syclist toolbox (Georgy et al. 2014). It allows to compute interpolated stellar models, isochrones, synthetic clusters, and to simulate the time-evolution of stellar populations.
  • Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, as they are advanced stages of the life of massive stars, provide a good test for various physical processes involved in the modelling of massive stars, such as rotation and mass loss. In this paper, we show the outputs of the latest grids of single massive stars computed with the Geneva stellar evolution code, and compare them with some observations. We present a short discussion on the shortcomings of single stars models and we also briefly discuss the impact of binarity on the WR populations.
  • Mass-loss rates during the red supergiant phase are very poorly constrained from an observational or theoretical point of view. However, they can be very high, and make a massive star lose a lot of mass during this phase, influencing considerably the final evolution of the star: will it end as a red supergiant? Will it evolve bluewards by removing its hydrogen-rich envelope? In this paper, we briefly summarise the effects of this mass loss and of the related uncertainties, particularly on the population of blue supergiant stars.
  • (abridged) The flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship (FGLR) of blue supergiant stars (BSG) links their absolute magnitude to the spectroscopically determined flux-weighted gravity log g = Teff^4. BSG are the brightest stars in the universe at visual light and the application of the FGLR has become a powerful tool to determine extragalactic distances. Observationally, the FGLR is a tight relationship with only small scatter. It is, therefore, ideal to be used as a constraint for stellar evolution models. The goal of this work is to investigate whether stellar evolution can reproduce the observed FGLR and to develop an improved foundation of the FGLR as an extragalactic distance indicator. We use different grids of stellar models for initial masses between 9 and 40 Msun, for metallicities between Z = 0.002 and 0.014, with and without rotation, computed with various mass loss rates during the red supergiant phase. For each of these models we discuss the details of post-main sequence evolution and construct theoretical FGLRs by means of population synthesis models which we then compare with the observed FGLR. In general, the stellar evolution model FGLRs agree reasonably well with the observed one. There are, however, differences between the models, in particular with regard to the shape and width (scatter) in the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity plane. The best agreement is obtained with models which include the effects of rotation and assume that the large majority, if not all the observed BSG evolve towards the red supergiant phase and only a few are evolving back from this stage. The effects of metallicity on the shape and scatter of the FGLR are small. (...)
  • Stability boundaries of radial pulsations in massive stars are compared with positions of variable and non-variable blue-supergiants in the spectroscopic HR (sHR) diagram (Langer & Kudritzki 2014), whose vertical axis is $4\log T_{\rm eff}-\log g \,(= \log L/M)$. Observational data indicate that variables tend to have higher $L/M$ than non-variables in agreement with the theoretical prediction. However, many variable blue-supergiants are found to have values of $L/M$ below the theoretical stability boundary; i.e., surface gravities seem to be too high by around 0.2-0.3 dex.