• We present a study of the dust-to-gas ratios in five nearby galaxies NGC 628 (M74), NGC 6503, NGC 7793, UGC 5139 (Holmberg I), and UGC 4305 (Holmberg II). Using Hubble Space Telescope broad band WFC3/UVIS UV and optical images from the Treasury program LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) combined with archival HST/ACS data, we correct thousands of individual stars for extinction across these five galaxies using an isochrone-matching (reddening-free Q) method. We generate extinction maps for each galaxy from the individual stellar extinctions using both adaptive and fixed resolution techniques, and correlate these maps with neutral HI and CO gas maps from literature, including The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) and the HERA CO-Line Extragalactic Survey (HERACLES). We calculate dust-to-gas ratios and investigate variations in the dust-to-gas ratio with galaxy metallicity. We find a power law relationship between dust-to-gas ratio and metallicity, consistent with other studies of dust-to-gas ratio compared to metallicity. We find a change in the relation when H$_2$ is not included. This implies that underestimation of $N_{H_2}$ in low-metallicity dwarfs from a too-low CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor $X_{CO}$ could have produced too low a slope in the derived relationship between dust-to-gas ratio and metallicity. We also compare our extinctions to those derived from fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) using the Bayesian Extinction and Stellar Tool (BEAST) for NGC 7793 and find systematically lower extinctions from SED-fitting as compared to isochrone matching.
  • The Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) is a multiwavelength Cycle 21 Treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope. It studied 50 nearby star-forming galaxies in five bands from the near UV to the I-band, combining new Wide Field Camera 3 observations with archival Advanced Camera for Surveys data. LEGUS was designed to investigate how star formation occurs and develops on both small and large scales, and how it relates to the galactic environments. In this paper we present the photometric catalogs for all the apparently single stars identified in the 50 LEGUS galaxies. Photometric catalogs and mosaicked images for all filters are available for download. We present optical and near UV color-magnitude diagrams for all the galaxies. For each galaxy we derived the distance from the tip of the red giant branch. We then used the NUV color-magnitude diagrams to identify stars more massive than 14 Mo, and compared their number with the number of massive stars expected from the GALEX FUV luminosity. Our analysis shows that the fraction of massive stars forming in star clusters and stellar associations is about constant with the star formation rate. This lack of a relation suggests that the time scale for evaporation of unbound structures is comparable or longer than 10 Myr. At low star formation rates this translates to an excess of mass in clustered environments as compared to model predictions of cluster evolution, suggesting that a significant fraction of stars form in unbound systems.
  • Recently acquired WFC3 UV (F275W and F336W) imaging mosaics under the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) combined with archival ACS data of M51 are used to study the young star cluster (YSC) population of this interacting system. Our newly extracted source catalogue contains 2834 cluster candidates, morphologically classified to be compact and uniform in colour, for which ages, masses and extinction are derived. In this first work we study the main properties of the YSC population of the whole galaxy, considering a mass-limited sample. Both luminosity and mass functions follow a power law shape with slope -2, but at high luminosities and masses a dearth of sources is observed. The analysis of the mass function suggests that it is best fitted by a Schechter function with slope -2 and a truncation mass at $1.00\pm0.12\times10^5\ M_\odot$. Through Monte Carlo simulations we confirm this result and link the shape of the luminosity function to the presence of a truncation in the mass function. A mass limited age function analysis, between 10 and 200 Myr, suggests that the cluster population is undergoing only moderate disruption. We observe little variation in the shape of the mass function at masses above $1\times10^4\ M_\odot$, over this age range. The fraction of star formation happening in the form of bound clusters in M51 is $\sim20\%$ in the age range 10 to 100 Myr and little variation is observed over the whole range from 1 to 200 Myr.
  • We present a study of the effective (half-light) radii and other structural properties of a systematically selected sample of young, massive star clusters (YMCs, $\geq$$5\times10^3$ M$_{\odot}$ and $\leq$200 Myr) in two nearby spiral galaxies, NGC 628 and NGC 1313. We use Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/UVIS and archival ACS/WFC data obtained by the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), an HST Treasury Program. We measure effective radii with GALFIT, a two-dimensional image-fitting package, and with a new technique to estimate effective radii from the concentration index (CI) of observed clusters. The distribution of effective radii from both techniques spans $\sim$0.5-10 pc and peaks at 2-3 pc for both galaxies. We find slight positive correlations between effective radius and cluster age in both galaxies, but no significant relationship between effective radius and galactocentric distance. Clusters in NGC 1313 display a mild increase in effective radius with cluster mass, but the trend disappears when the sample is divided into age bins. We show that the vast majority of the clusters in both galaxies are much older than their dynamical times, suggesting they are gravitationally bound objects. We find that about half of the clusters in NGC 628 are underfilling their Roche lobes, based on their Jacobi radii. Our results suggest that the young, massive clusters in NGC 628 and NGC 1313 are expanding due to stellar mass loss or two-body relaxation and are not significantly influenced by the tidal fields of their host galaxies.
  • We investigate the properties and evolution of star particles in two simulations of isolated spiral galaxies, and two galaxies from cosmological simulations. Unlike previous numerical work, where typically each star particle represents one `cluster', for the isolated galaxies we are able to model features we term `clusters' with groups of particles. We compute the spatial distribution of stars with different ages, and cluster mass distributions, comparing our findings with observations including the recent LEGUS survey. We find that spiral structure tends to be present in older (100s Myrs) stars and clusters in the simulations compared to the observations. This likely reflects differences in the numbers of stars or clusters, the strength of spiral arms, and whether the clusters are allowed to evolve. Where we model clusters with multiple particles, we are able to study their evolution. The evolution of simulated clusters tends to follow that of their natal gas clouds. Massive, dense, long-lived clouds host massive clusters, whilst short-lived clouds host smaller clusters which readily disperse. Most clusters appear to disperse fairly quickly, in basic agreement with observational findings. We note that embedded clusters may be less inclined to disperse in simulations in a galactic environment with continuous accretion of gas onto the clouds than isolated clouds and correspondingly, massive young clusters which are no longer associated with gas tend not to occur in the simulations. Caveats of our models include that the cluster densities are lower than realistic clusters, and the simplistic implementation of stellar feedback.
  • We present a combination of new and archival neutral hydrogen (HI) observations and new ionized gas spectroscopic observations for sixteen galaxies in the statistically representative EDGES kinematic sample. HI rotation curves are derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) as well as processed data products from the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope (WSRT). The HI rotation curves are supplemented with optical spectroscopic integral field unit (IFU) observations using SparsePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to constrain the central ionized gas kinematics in twelve galaxies. The full rotation curves of each galaxy are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6$\mu$m images from the Spitzer Space Telescope for the stellar content, the neutral hydrogen data for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. Differences in the inferred distribution of mass are illustrated under fixed stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and maximum disc/bulge assumptions in the rotation curve decomposition.
  • We present results from multiwavelength observations of the galaxy NGC5005. We use new neutral hydrogen (HI) observations from the Very Large Array to examine the neutral gas morphology and kinematics. We find an HI disk with a well-behaved flat rotation curve in the radial range 20\arcsec-140\arcsec. Ionized gas observations from the SparsePak integral field unit on the WIYN 3.5m telescope provide kinematics for the central 70\arcsec. We use both the SparsePak and HI velocity fields to derive a rotation curve for NGC5005. Deep 3.6{\mu}m observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope probe the faint extended stellar population of NGC5005. The images reveal a large stellar disk with a high surface brightness component that transitions to a low surface brightness component at a radius nearly 1.6 times farther than the extent of the gas disk detected in HI. The 3.6{\mu}m image is also decomposed into bulge and disk components to account for the stellar light distribution. Optical broadband B and R and narrowband H{\alpha} from the WIYN 0.9m telescope complement the 3.6{\mu}m data by providing information about the dominant stellar population and current star formation activity. The neutral and ionized gas rotation curve is used along with the stellar bulge and disk light profiles to decompose the mass distributions in NGC5005 and determine a dark matter halo model. The maximum stellar disk contribution to the total rotation curve is only about 70\%, suggesting that dark matter makes a significant contribution to the dynamics at all radii.
  • The [CII] 157.74 $\mu$m transition is the dominant coolant of the neutral interstellar gas, and has great potential as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer. Using the Herschel KINGFISH sample of 46 nearby galaxies, we investigate the relation of [CII] surface brightness and luminosity with SFR. We conclude that [CII] can be used for measurements of SFR on both global and kiloparsec scales in normal star-forming galaxies in the absence of strong active galactic nuclei (AGN). The uncertainty of the $\Sigma_{\rm [CII]}-\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ calibration is $\pm$0.21 dex. The main source of scatter in the correlation is associated with regions that exhibit warm IR colors, and we provide an adjustment based on IR color that reduces the scatter. We show that the color-adjusted $\Sigma_{\rm[CII]}-\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ correlation is valid over almost 5 orders of magnitude in $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$, holding for both normal star-forming galaxies and non-AGN luminous infrared galaxies. Using [CII] luminosity instead of surface brightness to estimate SFR suffers from worse systematics, frequently underpredicting SFR in luminous infrared galaxies even after IR color adjustment (although this depends on the SFR measure employed). We suspect that surface brightness relations are better behaved than the luminosity relations because the former are more closely related to the local far-UV field strength, most likely the main parameter controlling the efficiency of the conversion of far-UV radiation into gas heating. A simple model based on Starburst99 population-synthesis code to connect SFR to [CII] finds that heating efficiencies are $1\%-3\%$ in normal galaxies.
  • NGC 2146, a nearby luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG), presents evidence for outflows along the disk minor axis in all gas phases (ionized, neutral atomic and molecular). We present an analysis of the multi-phase starburst driven superwind in the central 5 kpc as traced in spatially resolved spectral line observations, using far-IR Herschel PACS spectroscopy, to probe the effects on the atomic and ionized gas, and optical integral field spectroscopy to examine the ionized gas through diagnostic line ratios. We observe an increased ~250 km/s velocity dispersion in the [OI] 63 micron, [OIII] 88 micron, [NII] 122 micron and [CII] 158 micron fine-structure lines that is spatially coincident with high excitation gas above and below the disk. We model this with a slow ~200 km/s shock and trace the superwind to the edge of our field of view 2.5 kpc above the disk. We present new SOFIA 37 micron observations to explore the warm dust distribution, and detect no clear dust entrainment in the outflow. The stellar kinematics appear decoupled from the regular disk rotation seen in all gas phases, consistent with a recent merger event disrupting the system. We consider the role of the superwind in the evolution of NGC 2146 and speculate on the evolutionary future of the system. Our observations of NGC 2146 in the far-IR allow an unobscured view of the wind, crucial for tracing the superwind to the launching region at the disk center, and provide a local analog for future ALMA observations of outflows in high redshift systems.
  • We investigate the far infrared spectrum of NGC 1266, a S0 galaxy that contains a massive reservoir of highly excited molecular gas. Using the SPIRE-FTS, we detect the $^{12}$CO ladder up to J=(13-12), [C I] and [N II] lines, and also strong water lines more characteristic of UltraLuminous IR Galaxies (ULIRGs). The 12CO line emission is modeled with a combination of a low-velocity C-shock and a PDR. Shocks are required to produce the H2O and most of the high-J 12CO emission. Despite having an infrared luminosity thirty times less than a typical ULIRG, the spectral characteristics and physical conditions of the ISM of NGC 1266 closely resemble those of ULIRGs, which often harbor strong shocks and large-scale outflows.
  • Dust has long been identified as a barrier to measuring inherent galaxy properties. However, the link between dust and attenuation is not straightforward and depends on both the amount of dust and its distribution. Herschel imaging of nearby galaxies undertaken as part of the KINGFISH project allows us to map the dust as seen in emission with unprecedented sensitivity and ~1 kpc resolution. We present here new optical integral field unit spectroscopy for eight of these galaxies that provides complementary 100-200 pc scale maps of the dust attenuation through observation of the reddening in both the Balmer decrement and the stellar continuum. The stellar continuum reddening, which is systematically less than that observed in the Balmer decrement, shows no clear correlation with the dust, suggesting that the distribution of stellar reddening acts as a poor tracer of the overall dust content. The brightest HII regions are observed to be preferentially located in dusty regions, and we do find a correlation between the Balmer line reddening and the dust mass surface density for which we provide an empirical relation. Some of the high-inclination systems in our sample exhibit high extinction, but we also find evidence that unresolved variations in the dust distribution on scales smaller than 500 pc may contribute to the scatter in this relation. We caution against the use of integrated A_V measures to infer global dust properties.
  • We use the near--infrared Br\gamma hydrogen recombination line as a reference star formation rate (SFR) indicator to test the validity and establish the calibration of the {\it Herschel} PACS 70 \mu m emission as a SFR tracer for sub--galactic regions in external galaxies. Br\gamma offers the double advantage of directly tracing ionizing photons and of being relatively insensitive to the effects of dust attenuation. For our first experiment, we use archival CFHT Br\gamma and Ks images of two nearby galaxies: NGC\,5055 and NGC\,6946, which are also part of the {\it Herschel} program KINGFISH (Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: a Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel). We use the extinction corrected Br\gamma emission to derive the SFR(70) calibration for H{\sc ii} regions in these two galaxies. A comparison of the SFR(70) calibrations at different spatial scales, from 200 pc to the size of the whole galaxy, reveals that about 50% of the total 70\mu m emission is due to dust heated by stellar populations that are unrelated to the current star formation. We use a simple model to qualitatively relate the increase of the SFR(70) calibration coefficient with decreasing region size to the star formation timescale. We provide a calibration for an unbiased SFR indicator that combines the observed H\alpha with the 70 \mu m emission, also for use in H{\sc ii} regions. We briefly analyze the PACS 100 and 160 \mu m maps and find that longer wavelengths are not as good SFR indicators as 70\mu m, in agreement with previous results. We find that the calibrations show about 50% difference between the two galaxies, possibly due to effects of inclination.
  • We present new empirical calibrations to estimate resolved and integrated total infrared luminosities from Spitzer and Herschel bands used as monochromatic or combined tracers. We base our calibrations on resolved elements of nearby galaxies (3 to 30 Mpc) observed with Herschel. We perform a resolved SED modelling of these objects using the Draine and Li (2007) dust models and investigate the influence of the addition of SPIRE measurements in the estimation of LTIR. We find that using data up to 250 um leads to local LTIR values consistent with those obtained with a complete coverage (up to 500 um) within 10 per cent for most of our resolved elements. We then study the distribution of energy in the resolved SEDs of our galaxies. The bulk of energy (30-50 per cent) is contained in the (70-160 um) band. The (24-70 um) fraction decreases with increasing metallicity. The (160-1100 um) submillimeter band can account for up to 25 per cent of the LTIR in metal-rich galaxies. We investigate the correlation between TIR surface brightnesses/luminosities and monochromatic Spitzer and Herschel surface brightnesses/luminosities. The three PACS bands can be used as reliable monochromatic estimators of the LTIR, the 100 um band being the most reliable monochromatic tracer. There is also a strong correlation between the SPIRE 250um and LTIR, although with more scatter than for the PACS relations. We also study the ability of our monochromatic relations to reproduce integrated LTIR of nearby galaxies as well as LTIR of z=1-3 sources. Finally, we provide calibration coefficients that can be used to derive TIR surface brightnesses/luminosities from a combination of Spitzer and Herschel surface brightnesses/fluxes and analyse the associated uncertainties.
  • We characterize the dust in NGC628 and NGC6946, two nearby spiral galaxies in the KINGFISH sample. With data from 3.6um to 500um, dust models are strongly constrained. Using the Draine & Li (2007) dust model, (amorphous silicate and carbonaceous grains), for each pixel in each galaxy we estimate (1) dust mass surface density, (2) dust mass fraction contributed by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)s, (3) distribution of starlight intensities heating the dust, (4) total infrared (IR) luminosity emitted by the dust, and (5) IR luminosity originating in regions with high starlight intensity. We obtain maps for the dust properties, which trace the spiral structure of the galaxies. The dust models successfully reproduce the observed global and resolved spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The overall dust/H mass ratio is estimated to be 0.0082+/-0.0017 for NGC628, and 0.0063+/-0.0009 for NGC6946, consistent with what is expected for galaxies of near-solar metallicity. Our derived dust masses are larger (by up to a factor 3) than estimates based on single-temperature modified blackbody fits. We show that the SED fits are significantly improved if the starlight intensity distribution includes a (single intensity) "delta function" component. We find no evidence for significant masses of cold dust T<12K. Discrepancies between PACS and MIPS photometry in both low and high surface brightness areas result in large uncertainties when the modeling is done at PACS resolutions, in which case SPIRE, MIPS70 and MIPS160 data cannot be used. We recommend against attempting to model dust at the angular resolution of PACS.
  • We examine Herschel Space Observatory images of one nearby prototypical outer ring galaxy, NGC 1291, and show that the ring becomes more prominent at wavelengths longer than 160um. The mass of cool dust in the ring dominates the total dust mass of the galaxy, accounting for at least 70% of it. The temperature of the emitting dust in the ring (T=19.5+/-0.3K) is cooler than that of the inner galaxy (T=25.7+/-0.7K). We discuss several explanations for the difference in dust temperature, including age and density differences in the stellar populations of the ring versus the bulge.
  • Taking advantage of the sensitivity and angular resolution of the Herschel Space Observatory at far-infrared and submm wavelengths, we aim to characterize the physical properties of cold dust within nearby galaxies and study the robustness of the parameters we derive using different modified blackbody models. For a pilot subsample of the KINGFISH program, we perform 2 temperature fits of the Spitzer and Herschel photometric data (24 to 500um), with a warm and a cold component, globally and in each resolution element.At global scales, we observe ranges of values for beta_c(0.8 to 2.5) and Tc(19.1 to 25.1K).We compute maps of our parameters with beta fixed or free to test the robustness of the temperature and dust surface density maps we deduce. When the emissivity is fixed, we observe temperature gradients as a function of radius.When the emissivity is fitted as a free parameter, barred galaxies tend to have uniform fitted emissivities.Gathering resolved elements in a Tc-beta_c diagram underlines an anti-correlation between the two parameters.It remains difficult to assess whether the dominant effect is the physics of dust grains, noise, or mixing along the line of sight and in the beam. We finally observe in both cases that the dust column density peaks in central regions of galaxies and bar ends (coinciding with molecular gas density enhancements usually found in these locations).We also quantify how the total dust mass varies with our assumptions about the emissivity index as well as the influence of the wavelength coverage used in the fits. We show that modified blackbody fits using a shallow emissivity (beta_c < 2.0) lead to significantly lower dust masses compared to the beta_c < 2.0 case, with dust masses lower by up to 50% if beta_c=1.5 for instance.The working resolution affects our total dust mass estimates: masses increase from global fits to spatially-resolved fits.
  • NGC 1097 is a nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy with a bright circumnuclear starburst ring, a strong large-scale bar and an active nucleus. We present a detailed study of the spatial variation of the far infrared (FIR) [CII]158um and [OI]63um lines and mid-infrared H2 emission lines as tracers of gas cooling, and of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands as tracers of the photoelectric heating, using Herschel-PACS, and Spitzer-IRS infrared spectral maps. We focus on the nucleus and the ring, and two star forming regions (Enuc N and Enuc S). We estimated a photoelectric gas heating efficiency ([CII]158um+[OI]63um)/PAH in the ring about 50% lower than in Enuc N and S. The average 11.3/7.7um PAH ratio is also lower in the ring, which may suggest a larger fraction of ionized PAHs, but no clear correlation with [CII]158{\mu}m/PAH(5.5 - 14um) is found. PAHs in the ring are responsible for a factor of two more [CII]158um and [OI]63um emission per unit mass than PAHs in the Enuc S. SED modeling indicates that at most 25% of the FIR power in the ring and Enuc S can come from high intensity photodissociation regions (PDRs), in which case G0 ~ 10^2.3 and nH ~ 10^3.5 cm^-3 in the ring. For these values of G0 and nH PDR models cannot reproduce the observed H2 emission. Much of the the H2 emission in the starburst ring could come from warm regions in the diffuse ISM that are heated by turbulent dissipation or shocks.
  • The physical state of interstellar gas and dust is dependent on the processes which heat and cool this medium. To probe heating and cooling of the ISM over a large range of infrared surface brightness, on sub-kiloparsec scales, we employ line maps of [C \ii] 158 $\mu$m, [O \one] 63 $\mu$m, and [N \ii] 122 $\mu$m in NGC 1097 and NGC 4559, obtained with the PACS spectrometer onboard {\it Herschel}. We matched new observations to existing Spitzer-IRS data that trace the total emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We confirm at small scales in these galaxies that the canonical measure of photoelectric heating efficiency, ([C \ii] + [O \one])/TIR, decreases as the far-infrared color, $\nu f_\nu$(70 $\mu$m)/$\nu f_\nu$(100 $\mu$m), increases. In contrast, the ratio of far-infrared (far-IR) cooling to total PAH emission, ([C \ii] + [O \one])/PAH, is a near constant $\sim$6% over a wide range of far-infrared color, 0.5 \textless\ $\nu f_\nu$(70 $\mu$m)/$\nu f_\nu$(100 $\mu$m) $\lesssim$ 0.95. In the warmest regions, where $\nu f_\nu$(70 $\mu$m)/$\nu f_\nu$(100 $\mu$m) $\gtrsim$ 0.95, the ratio ([C \ii] + [O \one])/PAH drops rapidly to 4%. We derived representative values of the local UV radiation density, $G_0$, and the gas density, $n_H$, by comparing our observations to models of photodissociation regions. The ratio $G_0/n_H$, derived from fine-structure lines, is found to correlate with the mean dust-weighted starlight intensity, $<U>$ derived from models of the IR SED. Emission from regions that exhibit a line deficit is characterized by an intense radiation field, indicating that small grains are susceptible to ionization effects. We note that there is a shift in the 7.7 / 11.3 $\mu$m PAH ratio in regions that exhibit a deficit in ([C \ii] + [O \one])/PAH, suggesting that small grains are ionized in these environments.
  • New far-infrared and sub-millimeter photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory is presented for 61 nearby galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) sample. The spatially-integrated fluxes are largely consistent with expectations based on Spitzer far-infrared photometry and extrapolations to longer wavelengths using popular dust emission models. Dwarf irregular galaxies are notable exceptions, as already noted by other authors, as their 500um emission shows evidence for a sub-millimeter excess. In addition, the fraction of dust heating attributed to intense radiation fields associated with photo-dissociation regions is found to be (21+/-4)% larger when Herschel data are included in the analysis. Dust masses obtained from the dust emission models of Draine & Li are found to be on average nearly a factor of two higher than those based on single-temperature modified blackbodies, as single blackbody curves do not capture the full range of dust temperatures inherent to any galaxy. The discrepancy is largest for galaxies exhibiting the coolest far-infrared colors.
  • Stellar density and bar strength should affect the temperatures of the cool (T ~ 20-30 K) dust component in the inner regions of galaxies, which implies that the ratio of temperatures in the circumnuclear regions to the disk should depend on Hubble type. We investigate the differences between cool dust temperatures in the central 3 kpc and disk of 13 nearby galaxies by fitting models to measurements between 70 and 500 microns. We attempt to quantify temperature trends in nearby disk galaxies, with archival data from Spitzer/MIPS and new observations with Herschel/SPIRE, which were acquired during the first phases of the Herschel observations for the KINGFISH (key insights in nearby galaxies: a far-infrared survey with Herschel) sample. We fit single-temperature modified blackbodies to far-infrared and submillimeter measurements of the central and disk regions of galaxies to determine the temperature of the component(s) emitting at those wavelengths. We present the ratio of central-region-to-disk-temperatures of the cool dust component of 13 nearby galaxies as a function of morphological type. We find a significant temperature gradient in the cool dust component in all galaxies, with a mean center-to-disk temperature ratio of 1.15 +/- 0.03. The cool dust temperatures in the central ~3 kpc of nearby galaxies are 23(+/-3)% hotter for morphological types earlier than Sc, and only 9(+/-3)% hotter for later types. The temperature ratio is also correlated with bar strength, with only strongly barred galaxies having a ratio over 1.2. The strong radiation field in the high stellar density of a galactic bulge tends to heat the cool dust component to higher temperatures, at least in early-type spirals with relatively large bulges, especially when paired with a strong bar.
  • NGC 1097 is a nearby SBb galaxy with a Seyfert nucleus and a bright starburst ring. We study the physical properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the ring using spatially resolved far-infrared spectral maps of the circumnuclear starburst ring of NGC 1097, obtained with the PACS spectrometer on board the Herschel Space Telescope. In particular, we map the important ISM cooling and diagnostic emission lines of [OI] 63 $\mu$m, [OIII] 88 $\mu$m, [NII] 122 $\mu$m, [CII] 158 $\mu$m and [NII] 205 $\mu$m. We observe that in the [OI] 63 $\mu$m, [OIII] 88 $\mu$m, and [NII] 122 $\mu$m line maps, the emission is enhanced in clumps along the NE part of the ring. We observe evidence of rapid rotation in the circumnuclear ring, with a rotation velocity of ~220$ km s$^{-1}$ (inclination uncorrected) measured in all lines. The [OI] 63 $\mu$m/[CII] 158 $\mu$m ratio varies smoothly throughout the central region, and is enhanced on the northeastern part of the ring, which may indicate a stronger radiation field. This enhancement coincides with peaks in the [OI] 63 $\mu$m and [OIII] 88 $\mu$m maps. Variations of the [NII] 122 $\mu$m/[NII] 205 $\mu$m ratio correspond to a range in the ionized gas density between 150 and 400 cm$^{-3}$.
  • Using infrared photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we perform the first inventory of aromatic feature emission (AFE, but also commonly referred to as PAH emission) for a statistically complete sample of star-forming galaxies in the local volume. The photometric methodology involved is calibrated and demonstrated to recover the aromatic fraction of the IRAC 8 micron flux with a standard deviation of 6% for a training set of 40 SINGS galaxies (ranging from stellar to dust dominated) with both suitable mid-infrared Spitzer IRS spectra and equivalent photometry. A potential factor of two improvement could be realized with suitable 5.5 and 10 micron photometry, such as what may be provided in the future by JWST. The resulting technique is then applied to mid-infrared photometry for the 258 galaxies from the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey, a large sample dominated in number by low-luminosity dwarf galaxies for which obtaining comparable mid-infrared spectroscopy is not feasible. We find the total LVL luminosity due to five strong aromatic features in the 8 micron complex to be 2.47E10 solar luminosities with a mean volume density of 8.8E6 solar luminosities per cubic Megaparsec. Twenty-four of the LVL galaxies, corresponding to a luminosity cut at M = -18.22 in the B band, account for 90% of the aromatic luminosity. Using oxygen abundances compiled from the literature for 129 of the 258 LVL galaxies, we find a correlation between metallicity and the aromatic to total infrared emission ratio but not the aromatic to total 8 micron dust emission ratio. A possible explanation is that metallicity plays a role in the abundance of aromatic molecules relative to the total dust content, but other factors such as star formation and/or the local radiation field affect the excitation of those molecules.
  • We investigate the relations among the stellar continuum-subtracted 8 micron polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH 8 micron) emission, 24 micron hot dust emission, and 160 micron cold dust emission in fifteen nearby face-on spiral galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey sample. The relation between PAH 8 and 24 micron emission measured in ~2 kpc regions is found to exhibit a significant amount of scatter, and strong spatial variations are observed in the (PAH 8 micron)/24 micron surface brightness ratio. In particular, the (PAH 8 micron)/24 micron surface brightness ratio is observed to be high in the diffuse interstellar medium and low in bright star-forming regions and other locations with high 24 micron surface brightness. PAH 8 micron emission is found to be well-correlated with 160 micron emission on spatial scales of ~2 kpc, and the (PAH 8 micron)/160 micron surface brightness ratio is generally observed to increase as the 160 micron surface brightness increases. These results suggest that the PAHs are associated with the diffuse, cold dust that produces most of the 160 micron emission in these galaxies, and the variations in the (PAH 8 micron)/160 micron ratio may generally be indicative of either the intensity or the spectrum of the interstellar radiation field that is heating both the PAHs and the diffuse interstellar dust.
  • Three dimensional spectroscopy of extended sources is typically performed with dedicated integral field spectrographs. We describe a method of reconstructing full spectral cubes, with two spatial and one spectral dimension, from rastered spectral mapping observations employing a single slit in a traditional slit spectrograph. When the background and image characteristics are stable, as is often achieved in space, the use of traditional long slits for integral field spectroscopy can substantially reduce instrument complexity over dedicated integral field designs, without loss of mapping efficiency -- particularly compelling when a long slit mode for single unresolved source followup is separately required. We detail a custom flux-conserving cube reconstruction algorithm, discuss issues of extended source flux calibration, and describe CUBISM, a tool which implements these methods for spectral maps obtained with ther Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph.
  • To study the distribution of star formation and dust emission within nearby galaxies, we measured five morphological parameters in the 3.6 and 24 micron wave bands for 65 galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) and 8 galaxies that were serendipitously observed by SINGS. The morphological parameters demonstrate strong variations along the Hubble sequence, including statistically significant differences between S0/a-Sab and Sc-Sd galaxies. Early-type galaxies are generally found to be compact, centralized, symmetric sources in the 24 micron band, while late-type galaxies are generally found to be extended, asymmetric sources. These results suggest that the processes that increase the real or apparent sizes of galaxies' bulges also lead to more centralized 24 micron dust emission. Several phenomena, such as strong nuclear star formation, Seyfert activity, or outer ring structures, may cause galaxies to deviate from the general morphological trends observed at 24 microns. We also note that the 24 micron morphologies of Sdm-Im galaxies are quite varied, with some objects appearing very compact and symmetric while others appear diffuse and asymmetric. These variations reflect the wide variation in star formation in irregular galaxies as observed at other wavelengths. The variations in the 24 micron morphological parameters across the Hubble sequence mirror many of the morphological trends seen in other tracers of the ISM and in stellar emission. However, the 24 micron morphological parameters for the galaxies in this sample do not match the morphological parameters measured in the stellar wave bands. This implies that the distribution of dust emission is related to but not equivalent to the distribution of stellar emission.