• Recently acquired WFC3 UV (F275W and F336W) imaging mosaics under the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) combined with archival ACS data of M51 are used to study the young star cluster (YSC) population of this interacting system. Our newly extracted source catalogue contains 2834 cluster candidates, morphologically classified to be compact and uniform in colour, for which ages, masses and extinction are derived. In this first work we study the main properties of the YSC population of the whole galaxy, considering a mass-limited sample. Both luminosity and mass functions follow a power law shape with slope -2, but at high luminosities and masses a dearth of sources is observed. The analysis of the mass function suggests that it is best fitted by a Schechter function with slope -2 and a truncation mass at $1.00\pm0.12\times10^5\ M_\odot$. Through Monte Carlo simulations we confirm this result and link the shape of the luminosity function to the presence of a truncation in the mass function. A mass limited age function analysis, between 10 and 200 Myr, suggests that the cluster population is undergoing only moderate disruption. We observe little variation in the shape of the mass function at masses above $1\times10^4\ M_\odot$, over this age range. The fraction of star formation happening in the form of bound clusters in M51 is $\sim20\%$ in the age range 10 to 100 Myr and little variation is observed over the whole range from 1 to 200 Myr.
  • We investigate the properties and evolution of star particles in two simulations of isolated spiral galaxies, and two galaxies from cosmological simulations. Unlike previous numerical work, where typically each star particle represents one `cluster', for the isolated galaxies we are able to model features we term `clusters' with groups of particles. We compute the spatial distribution of stars with different ages, and cluster mass distributions, comparing our findings with observations including the recent LEGUS survey. We find that spiral structure tends to be present in older (100s Myrs) stars and clusters in the simulations compared to the observations. This likely reflects differences in the numbers of stars or clusters, the strength of spiral arms, and whether the clusters are allowed to evolve. Where we model clusters with multiple particles, we are able to study their evolution. The evolution of simulated clusters tends to follow that of their natal gas clouds. Massive, dense, long-lived clouds host massive clusters, whilst short-lived clouds host smaller clusters which readily disperse. Most clusters appear to disperse fairly quickly, in basic agreement with observational findings. We note that embedded clusters may be less inclined to disperse in simulations in a galactic environment with continuous accretion of gas onto the clouds than isolated clouds and correspondingly, massive young clusters which are no longer associated with gas tend not to occur in the simulations. Caveats of our models include that the cluster densities are lower than realistic clusters, and the simplistic implementation of stellar feedback.
  • We present results from the first systematic search for outlying HII regions, as part of a sample of 96 emission-line point sources (referred to as ELdots - emission-line dots) derived from the NOAO Survey for Ionization in Neutral Gas Galaxies (SINGG). Our automated ELdot-finder searches SINGG narrow-band and continuum images for high equivalent width point sources outside the optical radius of the target galaxy (> 2 X r25 in the R-band). Follow-up longslit spectroscopy and deep GALEX images (exposure time > 1000 s) distinguish outlying HII regions from background galaxies whose strong emission lines ([OIII], Hbeta or [OII]) have been redshifted into the SINGG bandpass. We find that these deep GALEX images can serve as a substitute for spectroscopic follow-up because outlying HII regions separate cleanly from background galaxies in color-color space. We identify seven SINGG systems with outlying massive star formation that span a large range in Halpha luminosities corresponding to a few O stars in the most nearby cases, and unresolved dwarf satellite companion galaxies in the most distant cases. Six of these seven systems feature galaxies with nearby companions or interacting galaxies. Furthermore, our results indicate that some outlying HII regions are linked to the extended-UV disks discovered by GALEX, representing emission from the most massive O stars among a more abundant population of lower mass (or older) star clusters. The overall frequency of outlying HII regions in this sample of gas-rich galaxies is 8 - 11% when we correct for background emission-line galaxy contamination (~75% of ELdots).
  • We summarize the main properties of the extended UV (XUV) emission found in roughly 30% of the nearby spiral galaxies observed by the GALEX satellite. Two different classes of XUV disks are identified, the Type 1 XUV disks where significant, structured UV-bright features are found beyond the "classical" azimuthally-averaged star-formation threshold, and the Type 2 XUV disks, which are characterized by very extended (seven times the area where most of the stellar mass is found), blue [(FUV-K)<5mag] outer disks. These latter disks are extreme examples of galaxies growing inside-out. The few XUV disks studied in detail to date are rich in HI but relatively poor in molecular gas, have stellar populations with luminosity-weighted ages of ~1 Gyr, and ionized-gas metal abundances of ~Zsun/10. As part of the CAHA-XUV project we are in the process of obtaining deep multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopy of 65 XUV-disk galaxies so to determine whether or not these properties are common among XUV disks.
  • We describe HST imaging of recent star formation complexes located in the extended UV disk (XUV-disk) component of NGC 5236 (M 83), NGC 5055 (M 63), and NGC 2090. Photometry in four FUV--visible bands permits us to constrain the type of resolved stars and effective age of clusters, in addition to extinction. The preliminary results given herein focus on CMD analysis and clustering properties in this unique star-forming environment.
  • New images of M31 at 24, 70, and 160 micron taken with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) reveal the morphology of the dust in this galaxy. This morphology is well represented by a composite of two logarithmic spiral arms and a circular ring (radius ~10 kpc) of star formation offset from the nucleus. The two spiral arms appear to start at the ends of a bar in the nuclear region and extend beyond the star forming ring. As has been found in previous work, the spiral arms are not continuous but composed of spiral segments. The star forming ring is very circular except for a region near M32 where it splits. The lack of well defined spiral arms and the prominence of the nearly circular ring suggests that M31 has been distorted by interactions with its satellite galaxies. Using new dynamical simulations of M31 interacting with M32 and NGC 205 we find that, qualitatively, such interactions can produce an offset, split ring like that seen in the MIPS images.
  • New GALEX observations have detected significant FUV (1530 Angstroms) and NUV (2310 Angstroms) emission from stellar substructures within the tidal tails of four ongoing galaxy mergers. The UV-bright regions are optically faint and are coincident with HI density enhancements. FUV emission is detected at any location where the HI surface density exceeds ~2 M_sun pc^{-2}, and is often detected in the absence of visible wavelength emission. UV luminosities of the brighter regions of the tidal tails imply masses of 10^6 M_sun to ~10^9 M_sun in young stars in the tails, and HI luminosities imply similar HI masses. UV-optical colors of the tidal tails indicate stellar populations as young as a few Myr, and in all cases ages < 400Myr. Most of the young stars in the tails formed in single bursts rather than resulting from continuous star formation, and they formed *in situ* as the tails evolved. Star formation appears to be older near the parent galaxies and younger at increasing distances from the parent galaxy. This could be because the star formation occurs progressively along the tails, or because the star formation has been inhibited near the galaxy/tail interface. The youngest stellar concentrations, usually near the ends of long tidal tails, have masses comparable to confirmed tidal dwarf galaxies and may be newly forming galaxies undergoing their first burst of star formation.
  • Ultraviolet imaging with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) has revealed an extensive sample of UV-bright stellar complexes in the extreme outer disk of M83, extending to about four times the radius where the majority of HII regions are detected (R_HII = 5.1' or 6.6 kpc). These sources are typically associated with large-scale filamentary HI structures in the warped outer disk of M83, and are distributed beyond the galactocentric radii at which molecular ISM has yet been detected. We present measured properties of these stellar complexes, including FUV and NUV magnitudes and local gas surface density. Only a subset of the outer disk UV sources have corresponding HII regions detected in H-alpha imaging, consistent with a sample of mixed age in which some sources are a few Myr old and others are much more evolved (~ 10^8 yr).
  • We present Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) images of the prototypical edge-on starburst galaxies M82 and NGC253. Our initial analysis is restricted to the complex of ultraviolet (UV) filaments in the starburst-driven outflows in the galaxy halos. The UV luminosities in the halo are too high to be provided by shock-heated or photoionized gas except perhaps in the brightest filaments in M82, suggesting that most of the UV light is the stellar continuum of the starburst scattered into our line of sight by dust in the outflow. This interpretation agrees with previous results from optical imaging polarimetry in M82. The morphology of the UV filaments in both galaxies shows a high degree of spatial correlation with H-alpha and X-ray emission. This indicates that these outflows contain cold gas and dust, some of which may be vented into the intergalactic medium (IGM). UV light is seen in the ``H-alpha cap'' 11 kpc North of M82. If this cap is a result of the wind fluid running into a pre-existing gas cloud, the gas cloud contains dust and is not primordial in nature but was probably stripped from M82 or M81. If starburst winds efficiently expel dust into the IGM, this could have significant consequences for the observation of cosmologically distant objects.
  • We present Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) far-UV and near-UV mosaic observations covering the entirety of M31 and M33. For both targets, we measure the decline of surface brightness (in FUV and NUV) and changes in FUV--NUV color as a function of galactocentric radius. These UV radial profiles are compared to the distribution of ionized gas traced by H-alpha emission. We find that the extent of the UV emission, in both targets, is greater than the extent of the observed HII regions and diffuse ionized gas. We determine the ultraviolet diffuse fraction in M33 using our FUV observations and compare it to the H-alpha diffuse fraction obtained from wide-field narrow-band imaging. The FUV diffuse fraction appears to be remarkably constant near 0.65 over a large range in galactocentric radius, with departures to higher values in circumnuclear regions and, most notably, at the limit of the H-alpha disk. We suggest that the increase in FUV diffuse fraction at large galactocentric radii could indicate that a substantial portion of the diffuse emission beyond this point is not generated in situ but rather scattered from dust, after originating in the vicinity of the disk's outermost HII regions. Radial variation of the H-alpha diffuse fraction was also measured. We found the H-alpha diffuse fraction generally near 0.4 but rising toward the galaxy center, up to 0.6. We made no attempt to correct our diffuse fraction measurements for position-dependent extinction, so the quoted values are best interpreted as upper limits given the plausibly higher extinction for stellar clusters relative to their surroundings.