• The deep, near-infrared narrow-band survey HiZELS has yielded robust samples of H-alpha emitting star-forming galaxies within narrow redshift slices at z = 0.8, 1.47 and 2.23. In this paper, we distinguish the stellar mass and star-formation rate (SFR) dependence of the clustering of these galaxies. At high stellar masses (M/M_sol>2x10^10), where HiZELS selects galaxies close to the so-called star-forming main sequence, the clustering strength is observed to increase strongly with stellar mass (in line with the results of previous studies of mass-selected galaxy samples) and also with SFR. These two dependencies are shown to hold independently. At lower stellar masses, however, where HiZELS probes high specific SFR galaxies, there is little or no dependence of the clustering strength on stellar mass, but the dependence on SFR remains: high-SFR low-mass galaxies are found in more massive dark matter haloes than their lower SFR counterparts. We argue that this is due to environmentally driven star formation in these systems. We apply the same selection criteria to the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We find that, in EAGLE, the high-SFR low-mass galaxies are central galaxies in more massive dark matter haloes, in which the high SFRs are driven by a (halo-driven) increased gas content.
  • We study 379 central and 159 satellite early-type galaxies with two-dimensional kinematics from the integral-field survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) to determine how their angular momentum content depends on stellar and halo mass. Using the Yang et. al. (2007) group catalog, we identify central and satellite galaxies in groups with halo masses in the range 10^12.5 h^-1 M_sun < M_200b < 10^15 h^-1 M_sun. As in previous work, we see a sharp dependence on stellar mass, in the sense that ~ 70% of galaxies with stellar mass M_* > 10^11 h^-2 M_sun tend to have very little rotation, while nearly all galaxies at lower mass show some net rotation. The ~ 30% of high-mass galaxies that have significant rotation do not stand out in other galaxy properties except for a higher incidence of ionized gas emission. Our data are consistent with recent simulation results suggesting that major merging and gas accretion have more impact on the rotational support of lower-mass galaxies. When carefully matching the stellar mass distributions, we find no residual differences in angular momentum content between satellite and central galaxies at the 20\% level. Similarly, at fixed mass, galaxies have consistent rotation properties across a wide range of halo mass. However, we find that errors in classification of centrals and satellites with group finders systematically lowers differences between satellite and central galaxies at a level that is comparable to current measurement uncertainties. To improve constraints, the impact of group finding methods will have to be forward modeled via mock catalogs.
  • The "kinematic" morphology-density relation for early-type galaxies posits that those galaxies with low angular momentum are preferentially found in the highest-density regions of the universe. We use a large sample of galaxy groups with halo masses 10^12.5 < M_halo < 10^14.5 M_sun/h observed with the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) survey to examine whether there is a correlation between local environment and rotational support that is independent of stellar mass. We find no compelling evidence for a relationship between the angular momentum content of early-type galaxies and either local overdensity or radial position within the group at fixed stellar mass.
  • We present clustering analyses of identically-selected star-forming galaxies in 3 narrow redshift slices (at z=0.8, z=1.47 and z=2.23), from HiZELS, a deep, near-infrared narrow-band survey. The HiZELS samples span the peak in the cosmic star-formation rate density, identifying typical star-forming galaxies at each epoch. Narrow-band samples have well-defined redshift distributions and are therefore ideal for clustering analyses. We quantify the clustering of the three samples, and of H-alpha luminosity-selected subsamples, initially using simple power law fits to the two-point correlation function. We extend this work to link the evolution of star-forming galaxies and their host dark matter halos over cosmic time using sophisticated dark matter halo models. We find that the clustering strength, r0, and the bias of galaxy populations relative to the clustering of dark matter increase linearly with H-alpha luminosity (and, by implication, star-formation rate) at all three redshifts, as do the host dark matter halo masses of the HiZELS galaxies. The typical galaxies in our samples are star-forming centrals, residing in halos of mass M_halo ~ a few times 10^12M_solar. We find a remarkably tight redshift-independent relation between the H-alpha luminosity scaled by the characteristic luminosity, L(H-alpha)/L(H-alpha)*(z), and the minimum host dark matter halo mass of central galaxies. This reveals that the dark matter halo environment is a strong driver of galaxy star-formation rate and therefore of the evolution of the star-formation rate density in the Universe.
  • (abridged) We present a clustering analysis of 370 high-confidence H-alpha emitters (HAEs) at z=2.23. The HAEs are detected in the Hi-Z Emission Line Survey (HiZELS), a large-area blank field 2.121um narrowband survey using the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) Wide Field Camera (WFCAM). Averaging the two-point correlation function of HAEs in two ~1 degree scale fields (United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey/Ultra Deep Survey [UDS] and Cosmological Evolution Survey [COSMOS] fields) we find a clustering amplitude equivalent to a correlation length of r_0=3.7+/-0.3 Mpc/h for galaxies with star formation rates of >7 M_sun/yr. The data are well-fitted by the expected correlation function of Cold Dark Matter, scaled by a bias factor: omega_HAE=b^2 omega_DM where b=2.4^{+0.1}_{-0.2}. The corresponding 'characteristic' mass for the halos hosting HAEs is log(M_h/[M_sun/h])=11.7+/-0.1. Comparing to the latest semi-analytic GALFORM predictions for the evolution of HAEs in a LCDM cosmology, we find broad agreement with the observations, with GALFORM predicting a HAE correlation length of ~4 Mpc/h. Motivated by this agreement, we exploit the simulations to construct a parametric model of the halo occupation distribution (HOD) of HAEs, and use this to fit the observed clustering. Our best-fitting HOD can adequately reproduce the observed angular clustering of HAEs, yielding an effective halo mass and bias in agreement with that derived from the scaled omega_DM fit, but with the relatively small sample size the current data provide a poor constraint on the HOD. Our results support the broad picture that 'typical' (~L*) star-forming galaxies have been hosted by dark matter haloes with M_h<10^12 M_sun/h since z~2, but with a broad occupation distribution and clustering that is likely to be a strong function of luminosity.
  • We obtain constraints on cosmological parameters from the spherically averaged redshift-space correlation function of the CMASS Data Release 9 (DR9) sample of the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We combine this information with additional data from recent CMB, SN and BAO measurements. Our results show no significant evidence of deviations from the standard flat-Lambda CDM model, whose basic parameters can be specified by Omega_m = 0.285 +- 0.009, 100 Omega_b = 4.59 +- 0.09, n_s = 0.96 +- 0.009, H_0 = 69.4 +- 0.8 km/s/Mpc and sigma_8 = 0.80 +- 0.02. The CMB+CMASS combination sets tight constraints on the curvature of the Universe, with Omega_k = -0.0043 +- 0.0049, and the tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio, for which we find r < 0.16 at the 95 per cent confidence level (CL). These data show a clear signature of a deviation from scale-invariance also in the presence of tensor modes, with n_s <1 at the 99.7 per cent CL. We derive constraints on the fraction of massive neutrinos of f_nu < 0.049 (95 per cent CL), implying a limit of sum m_nu < 0.51 eV. We find no signature of a deviation from a cosmological constant from the combination of all datasets, with a constraint of w_DE = -1.033 +- 0.073 when this parameter is assumed time-independent, and no evidence of a departure from this value when it is allowed to evolve as w_DE(a) = w_0 + w_a (1 - a). The achieved accuracy on our cosmological constraints is a clear demonstration of the constraining power of current cosmological observations.
  • Deep, wide, near-infrared imaging surveys provide an opportunity to study the clustering of various galaxy populations at high redshift on the largest physical scales. We have selected $1<z<2$ extremely red objects (EROs) and $1<z<3$ distant red galaxies (DRGs) in SA22 from the near-infrared photometric data of the UKIDSS Deep eXtragalactic Survey (DXS) and $gri$ optical data from CTIO covering 3.3~deg$^2$. This is the largest contiguous area studied to sufficient depth to select these distant galaxies to date. The angular two-point correlation functions and the real space correlation lengths of each population are measured and show that both populations are strongly clustered and that the clustering cannot be parameterised with a single power law. The correlation function of EROs shows a double power law with the inflection at $\sim$ 0.6$'$--1.2$'$ (0.6--1.2~h$^{-1}$~Mpc). The bright EROs ($K<18.8$) show stronger clustering on small scales but similar clustering on larger scales, whereas redder EROs show stronger clustering on all scales. Clustering differences between EROs that are old passively evolved galaxies (OGs) and dusty star-forming galaxies (DGs), on the basis of their $J-K$ colour, are also investigated. The clustering of $r-K$ EROs are compared with that of $i-K$ EROs and the differences are consistent with their expected redshift distributions. The correlation function of DRGs is also well described by a double power law and consistent with previous studies once the effects of the broader redshift distribution our selection of DRGs returns are taken into account. We also perform the same analysis on smaller sub-fields to investigate the impact of cosmic variance on the derived clustering properties. Currently this study is the most representative measurement of the clustering of massive galaxies at $z>1$ on large scales.
  • Luminous red galaxies (LRGs) are much rarer and more massive than L* galaxies. Coupled with their extreme colours, LRGs therefore provide a demanding testing ground for the physics of massive galaxy formation. We present the first self-consistent predictions for the abundance and properties of LRGs in hierarchical structure formation models. We test two published models which use quite different mechanisms to suppress the formation of massive galaxies: the Bower et al. (2006) model, which invokes ``AGN-feedback'' to prevent gas from cooling in massive haloes, and the Baugh et al. (2005) model which relies upon a ``superwind'' to eject gas before it is turned into stars. Without adjusting any parameters, the Bower et al. model gives an excellent match to the observed luminosity function of LRGs in the SDSS (with a median redshift of z=0.24) and to their clustering; the Baugh et al. model is less successful in these respects. Both models fail to match the observed abundance of LRGs at z=0.5 to better than a factor of ~2. In the models, LRGs are typically bulge dominated systems with M* of ~2x10^11 h^{-1} M_sun and velocity dispersions of ~250 km s^{-1}. Around half of the stellar mass in the model LRGs is already formed by z~2.2 and is assembled into one main progenitor by z~1.5; on average, only 25% of the mass of the main progenitor is added after z~1. LRGs are predicted to be found in a wide range of halo masses, a conclusion which relies on properly taking into account the scatter in the formation histories of haloes. Remarkably, we find that the correlation function of LRGs is predicted to be a power law down to small pair separations, in excellent agreement with observational estimates. Neither the Bower et al. nor the Baugh et al. model is able to reproduce the observed radii of LRGs.
  • We present new measurements of the luminosity function (LF) of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the 2dF-SDSS LRG and Quasar (2SLAQ) survey. We have carefully quantified, and corrected for, uncertainties in the K and evolutionary corrections, differences in the colour selection methods, and the effects of photometric errors, thus ensuring we are studying the same galaxy population in both surveys. Using a limited subset of 6326 SDSS LRGs (with 0.17<z<0.24) and 1725 2SLAQ LRGs (with 0.5 <z<0.6), for which the matching colour selection is most reliable, we find no evidence for any additional evolution in the LRG LF, over this redshift range, beyond that expected from a simple passive evolution model. This lack of additional evolution is quantified using the comoving luminosity density of SDSS and 2SLAQ LRGs, brighter than M_r - 5logh = -22.5, which are 2.51+/-0.03 x 10^-7 L_sun Mpc^-3 and 2.44+/-0.15 x 10^-7 L_sun Mpc^-3 respectively (<10% uncertainty). We compare our LFs to the COMBO-17 data and find excellent agreement over the same redshift range. Together, these surveys show no evidence for additional evolution (beyond passive) in the LF of LRGs brighter than M_r - 5logh = -21 (or brighter than L*). We test our SDSS and 2SLAQ LFs against a simple ``dry merger'' model for the evolution of massive red galaxies and find that at least half of the LRGs at z=0.2 must already have been well-assembled (with more than half their stellar mass) by z=0.6. This limit is barely consistent with recent results from semi-analytical models of galaxy evolution.