• A new class of ultra-long duration (>10,000 s) gamma-ray bursts has recently been suggested. They may originate in the explosion of stars with much larger radii than normal long gamma-ray bursts or in the tidal disruptions of a star. No clear supernova had yet been associated with an ultra-long gamma-ray burst. Here we report that a supernova (2011kl) was associated with the ultra-long duration burst 111209A, at z=0.677. This supernova is more than 3 times more luminous than type Ic supernovae associated with long gamma-ray bursts, and its spectrum is distinctly different. The continuum slope resembles those of super-luminous supernovae, but extends farther down into the rest-frame ultra-violet implying a low metal content. The light curve evolves much more rapidly than super-luminous supernovae. The combination of high luminosity and low metal-line opacity cannot be reconciled with typical type Ic supernovae, but can be reproduced by a model where extra energy is injected by a strongly magnetized neutron star (a magnetar), which has also been proposed as the explanation for super-luminous supernovae.
  • We present the first uniform treatment of long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy detections and upper limits over the redshift range 3<z<5, a key epoch for observational and theoretical efforts to understand the processes, environments, and consequences of early cosmic star formation. We contribute deep imaging observations of 13 GRB positions yielding the discovery of eight new host galaxies. We use this dataset in tandem with previously published observations of 31 further GRB positions to estimate or constrain the host galaxy rest-frame ultraviolet (UV; 1600 A) absolute magnitudes M_UV. We then use the combined set of 44 M_UV estimates and limits to construct the M_UV luminosity function (LF) for GRB host galaxies over 3<z<5 and compare it to expectations from Lyman break galaxy (LBG) photometric surveys with the Hubble Space Telescope. Adopting standard prescriptions for the luminosity dependence of galaxy dust obscuration (and hence, total star formation rate), we find that our LF is compatible with LBG observations over a factor of 600x in host luminosity, from M_UV = -22.5 mag to >-15.6 mag, and with extrapolations of the assumed Schechter-type LF well beyond this range. We review proposed astrophysical and observational biases for our sample, and find they are for the most part minimal. We therefore conclude, as the simplest interpretation of our results, that GRBs successfully trace UV metrics of cosmic star formation over the range 3<z<5. Our findings suggest GRBs are providing an accurate picture of star formation processes from z ~3 out to the highest redshifts.
  • The external forward shock (EFS) models have been the standard paradigm to interpret the broad-band afterglow data of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One prediction of the models is that some afterglow temporal breaks at different energy bands should be achromatic. Observations in the Swift era have revealed chromatic afterglow behaviors at least in some GRBs, casting doubts on the EFS origin of GRB afterglows. In this paper, we perform a systematic study to address the question: how bad/good are the external forward shock models? Our sample includes 85 GRBs well-monitored X-ray and optical lightcurves. Based on how well the data abide by the EFS models, we categorize them as: Gold sample: (Grade I and II) include 45/85 GRBs. They show evidence of, or are consistent with having, an achromatic break. The temporal/spectral behaviors in each afterglow segment are consistent with the predictions (closure relations) of the EFS models. Silver sample: (Grade III and IV) include 37/85 GRBs. They are also consistent with having an achromatic break, even though one or more afterglow segments do not comply with the closure relations. Bad sample: (Grade V), 3/85 shows direct evidence of chromatic behaviors, suggesting that the EFS models are inconsistent with the data. These are included in the Bad sample. We further perform statistical analyses of various observational properties ($\alpha$, $\beta$, $t_b$ and model parameters (energy injection index q, p, $\theta_j$, $\eta_\gamma$, etc) of the GRBs in the Gold Sample, and derive constraints on the magnetization parameter $\epsilon_B$ in the EFS. Overall, we conclude that the simplest EFS models can account for the multi-wavelength afterglow data of at least half of the GRBs. When more advanced modeling (e.g., long-lasting reverse shock, structured jets) is invoked, up to $>90 \%$ of the afterglows may be interpreted within the framework of the ESF models.
  • We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous ($M_{r}\approx-27.8$ mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 140226A. This marks the first unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically distant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value of $\Re_{\mathrm{rel}}=610$ yr$^{-1}$ (68% confidence interval of 110-2000 yr$^{-1}$). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncertainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona fide "orphan" afterglows (i.e., those lacking detectable high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.
  • (...) Since 1998, only half a dozen spectroscopically confirmed associations have been discovered and XRF 100316D associated with the type-Ic SN 2010bh at z = 0.059 is among the latest. We began observations with GROND 12 hours after the GRB trigger and continued until 80 days after the burst. GROND provided excellent photometric data in six filter bands covering a wavelength range from approx. 350 to 1800 nm, significantly expanding the pre-existing data set for this event. Combining GROND and Swift data, the early broad-band SED is modelled with a blackbody and afterglow component attenuated by dust and gas absorption. The best-fit SED models imply moderate reddening along the line of sight through the host galaxy (A_V = 1.2 \pm 0.1 mag). The temperature and radius evolution of the thermal component are analysed and combined with earlier measurements available from the literature. This reveals a cooling envelope at an apparent initial radius of 7 \times 10^11 cm, which is compatible with a dense wind surrounding a Wolf-Rayet star. Multicolour templates of SN 1998bw are fitted to the SN to directly compare the light-curve properties. This shows that SN 2010bh is ~65% as bright as SN 1998bw. Reaching maximum brightness at ~8 days after the burst in the blue bands, SN 2010bh proves to be the most rapidly evolving GRB-SNe to date. Finally, a two-component parametrised model is fitted to the quasi-bolometric light curve, which delivers physical parameters of the explosion. This yields M_Ni = 0.21 \pm 0.03 M\bigodot and M_ej = 2.6 \pm 0.2 M\bigodot, typical of values within the GRB-SN population. The kinetic energy is 2.4 \pm 0.7 \times 10^52 erg, which is making this SN the second most energetic GRB-SN after SN 1998bw. This supernova has one of the earliest peaks ever recorded and thereafter fades more rapidly than other GRB-SNe, hypernovae, or typical type-Ic SNe. (...)
  • (Abridged) The two high-redshift gamma-ray bursts, GRB 080913 at z=6.7 and GRB 090423 at z=8.3, recently detected by Swift appear as intrinsically short, hard GRBs. They could have been recognized by BATSE as short/hard GRBs should they have occurred at z <= 1. We perform a more thorough investigation on two physically distinct types (Type I/II) of cosmological GRBs and their observational characteristics. We reiterate the definitions of Type I/II GRBs and review the observational criteria and their physical motivations. Contrary to the traditional approach of assigning the physical category based on the gamma-ray properties (duration, hardness, and spectral lag), we take an alternative approach to define the Type I and Type II Gold Samples using several criteria that are more directly related to the GRB progenitors, and study the properties of the two Gold Samples and compare them with the traditional long/soft and short/hard samples. We find that the Type II Gold Sample reasonably tracks the long/soft population, although it includes several intrinsically short (shorter than 1s in the rest frame) GRBs. The Type I Gold Sample only has 5 GRBs, 4 of which are not strictly short but have extended emission. Other short/hard GRBs detected in the Swift era represent the BATSE short/hard sample well, but it is unclear whether all of them belong to Type I. We suggest that some (probably even most) high-luminosity short/hard GRBs instead belong to Type II. We suggest that GRB 080913 and GRB 090423 are more likely Type II events. We re-emphasize the importance of invoking multiple observational criteria, and cautiously propose an operational procedure to infer the physical origin of a given GRB with available multiple observational criteria, with various caveats laid out.
  • We report on multi-wavelength observations, ranging from the X-ray to radio wave bands, of the IPN-localized gamma-ray burst GRB 070125. Spectroscopic observations reveal the presence of absorption lines due to O I, Si II, and C IV, implying a likely redshift of z = 1.547. The well-sampled light curves, in particular from 0.5 to 4 days after the burst, suggest a jet break at 3.7 days, corresponding to a jet opening angle of ~7.0 degrees, and implying an intrinsic GRB energy in the 1 - 10,000 keV band of around E = (6.3 - 6.9)x 10^(51) erg (based on the fluences measured by the gamma-ray detectors of the IPN network). GRB 070125 is among the brightest afterglows observed to date. The spectral energy distribution implies a host extinction of Av < 0.9 mag. Two rebrightening episodes are observed, one with excellent time coverage, showing an increase in flux of 56% in ~8000 seconds. The evolution of the afterglow light curve is achromatic at all times. Late-time observations of the afterglow do not show evidence for emission from an underlying host galaxy or supernova. Any host galaxy would be subluminous, consistent with current GRB host-galaxy samples. Evidence for strong Mg II absorption features is not found, which is perhaps surprising in view of the relatively high redshift of this burst and the high likelihood for such features along GRB-selected lines of sight.
  • GRB 060505 was the first well-observed nearby possible long-duration GRB that had no associated supernova. Here we present spatially resolved spectra of the host galaxy of GRB 060505, an Sbc spiral, at redshift z=0.0889. The GRB occurred inside a star-forming region in the northern spiral arm at 6.5 kpc from the center. From the position of the emission lines, we determine a maximum rotational velocity for the galaxy of v~212km/s corresponding to a mass of 1.14x10^11 M_solar within 11 kpc from the center. By fitting single-age spectral synthesis models to the stellar continuum, we derive a very young age for the GRB site, confirmed by photometric and Halpha line measurements, of around 6 Myr which corresponds to the lifetime of a 32 M_solar star. The metallicity derived from several emission line measurements is lowest at the GRB site with 1/5 Z_solar but roughly solar in the rest of the galaxy. Using the 2dF galaxy redshift survey we can locate the host galaxy in its large scale (Mpc) environment. The galaxy lies in the foreground of a filamentary overdensity extending south west from the galaxy cluster Abell 3837 at z=0.0896. The properties of the GRB site are similar to those found for other long-duration GRB host galaxies with high specific star formation rate and low metallicity, which is an indication that GRB 060505 originated from a young massive star that died without making a supernova.