• Asteroseismology of solar-type stars has an important part to play in the exoplanet program of the NASA Kepler Mission. Precise and accurate inferences on the stellar properties that are made possible by the seismic data allow very tight constraints to be placed on the exoplanetary systems. Here, we outline how to make an estimate of the detectability of solar-like oscillations in any given Kepler target, using rough estimates of the temperature and radius, and the Kepler apparent magnitude.
  • We validate the performance and accuracy of the current SEGUE (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration) Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP), which determines stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity) by comparing derived overall metallicities and radial velocities from selected likely members of three globular clusters (M 13, M 15, and M 2) and two open clusters (NGC 2420 and M 67) to the literature values. Spectroscopic and photometric data obtained during the course of the original Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I) and its first extension (SDSS-II/SEGUE) are used to determine stellar radial velocities and atmospheric parameter estimates for stars in these clusters. Based on the scatter in the metallicities derived for the members of each cluster, we quantify the typical uncertainty of the SSPP values, sigma([Fe/H]) = 0.13 dex for stars in the range of 4500 K < Teff < 7500 K and 2.0 < log g < 5.0, at least over the metallicity interval spanned by the clusters studied (-2.3 < [Fe/H] < 0). The surface gravities and effective temperatures derived by the SSPP are also compared with those estimated from the comparison of the color-magnitude diagrams with stellar evolution models; we find satisfactory agreement. At present, the SSPP underestimates [Fe/H] for near-solar-metallicity stars, represented by members of M 67 in this study, by about 0.3 dex.
  • We continue our program of single-site observations of pulsating subdwarf B (sdB) stars and present the results of extensive time series photometry of HS 0039+4302 and HS 0444+0458. Both were observed at MDM Observatory during the fall of 2005. We extend the number of known frequencies for HS 0039+4302 from 4 to 14 and discover one additional frequency for HS 0444+0458, bringing the total to three. We perform standard tests to search for multiplet structure, measure amplitude variations, and examine the frequency density to constrain the mode degree $\ell$. Including the two stars in this paper, 23 pulsating sdB stars have received follow-up observations designed to decipher their pulsation spectra. It is worth an examination of what has been detected. We compare and contrast the frequency content in terms of richness and range and the amplitudes with regards to variability and diversity. We use this information to examine observational correlations with the proposed $\kappa$ pulsation mechanism as well as alternative theories.
  • We present follow-up observations of pulsating subdwarf B (sdB) stars as part of our efforts to resolve the pulsation spectra for use in asteroseismological analyses. This paper reports on multisite campaigns of the pulsating sdB stars PG 1618+563B and PG 0048+091. Data were obtained from observatories placed around the globe for coverage from all longitudes. For PG 1618+563B, our five-site campaign uncovered a dichotomy of pulsation states: Early during the campaign the amplitudes and phases (and perhaps frequencies) were quite variable while data obtained late in the campaign were able to fully resolve five stable pulsation frequencies. For PG 0048+091, our five-site campaign uncovered a plethora of frequencies with short pulsation lifetimes. We find them to have observed properties consistent with stochastically excited oscillations, an unexpected result for subdwarf B stars. We discuss our findings and their impact on subdwarf B asteroseismology.
  • We report on two recent z~4 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), GRB 060206 and GRB 060210, for which we have obtained well-sampled optical light curves. Our data, combined with early optical data reported in the literature, shows unusual behavior for both afterglows. In R-band GRB 060206 (z=4.045) experienced a slow early decay, followed by a rapid increase in brightness by factor ~2.5 about 1 hour after the burst. Its afterglow then faded in a broken power-law fashion, with a smooth break at t_b=0.6 days, but with additional, less dramatic (~10%) ``bumps and wiggles'', well detected in the densely sampled light curve. The R-band afterglow of GRB 060210 (z=3.91) is also unusual: the light curves was more or less flat between 60 and 300 sec after the burst, followed by ~70% increase at ~600 sec after the burst, after which the light curve declined as a t^{-1.3} power-law. Despite earlier reports to the contrary, we find that for GRB 060206 X-rays also more or less follow the optical decay, but with significant variations on short timescales. However, the X-ray afterglow is contaminated by a nearby, variable source, which especially at late times obscures the behavior of the X-ray afterglow. We argue that ``anomalous'' optical afterglows are likely to be the norm, and that the rapid variations often seen in Swift-XRT data would also be seen in the optical light curves, given good enough sampling. As a result, some of the often employed procedures, such as deriving the jet opening angle using a smooth broken power-law fit to the optical light curves, in many cases might have a poor statistical significance. We argue that the early increase in brighness for both bursts might be due to the turn-on of the external shock. Existence of such features could provide valuable additional information about the burst. (Abridged)
  • We report the imaging and spectroscopic localization of GRB 060218 to a low-metallicity dwarf starburst galaxy at z = 0.03345 +/- 0.00006. In addition to making it the second nearest gamma-ray burst known, optical spectroscopy reveals the earliest detection of weak, supernova-like Si II near 5720 Angstroms (0.1c), starting 1.95 days after the burst trigger. UBVRI photometry obtained between 1 and 26 days post-burst confirms the early rise of supernova light, and suggests a short time delay between the gamma-ray burst and the onset of SN 2006aj if the early appearance of a soft component in the X-ray spectrum is understood as a ``shock breakout''. Together, these results verify the long-hypothesized origin of soft gamma-ray bursts in the deaths of massive stars.
  • We continue our programme of extended single-site observations of pulsting subdwarf B (sdB) stars and present the results of extensive time series photometry to resolve the pulsation spectra for use in asteroseismological analyses. PG 0154+182, HS 1824+5745, and HS 2151+0857 were observed at the MDM Observatory during 2004 and 2005. Our observations are sufficient to resolve the pulsations of all three target stars. We extend the number of known frequencies for PG 0154+182 from one to six, confirm that HS 1824+5745 is a mono-periodic pulsator, and extend the number of known frequencies to five for HS 2151+0857. We perform standard tests to search for multiplet structure, measure amplitude variations as pertains to stochastic excitation, and examine the mode density to constrain the mode degree l.
  • We detect a Neptune mass-ratio (q~8e-5) planetary companion to the lens star in the extremely high-magnification (A~800) microlensing event OGLE-2005-BLG-169. If the parent is a main-sequence star, it has mass M~0.5 M_sun implying a planet mass of ~13 M_earth and projected separation of ~2.7 AU. When intensely monitored over their peak, high-magnification events similar to OGLE-2005-BLG-169 have nearly complete sensitivity to Neptune mass-ratio planets with projected separations of 0.6 to 1.6 Einstein radii, corresponding to 1.6--4.3 AU in the present case. Only two other such events were monitored well enough to detect Neptunes, and so this detection by itself suggests that Neptune mass-ratio planets are common. Moreover, another Neptune was recently discovered at a similar distance from its parent star in a low-magnification event, which are more common but are individually much less sensitive to planets. Combining the two detections yields 90% upper and lower frequency limits f=0.37^{+0.30}_{-0.21} over just 0.4 decades of planet-star separation. In particular, f>16% at 90% confidence. The parent star hosts no Jupiter-mass companions with projected separations within a factor 5 of that of the detected planet. The lens-source relative proper motion is \mu~7--10 mas/yr, implying that if the lens is sufficiently bright, I<23.8, it will be detectable by HST by 3 years after peak. This would permit a more precise estimate of the lens mass and distance, and so the mass and projected separation of the planet. Analogs of OGLE-2005-BLG-169Lb orbiting nearby stars would be difficult to detect by other methods of planet detection, including radial velocities, transits, or astrometry.
  • We present the results of extensive time series photometry of the pulsating subdwarf B star KPD 2109+4401. Our data set consists of 29 data runs with a total length of 182.6 hours over 31 days, collected at five observatories in 2004. These data are comprised of high signal-to-noise observations acquired with larger telescopes and wider time coverage observations obtained with smaller telescopes. They are sufficient to resolve the pulsation structure to 0.4 $\mu$Hz and are the most extensive data set for this star to date. With these data, we identify eight pulsation frequencies extending from 4701 to 5481 $\mu$Hz, corresponding to periods of 182 to 213 s. The pulsation frequencies and their amplitudes are examined over several time-scales with some frequencies showing amplitude variability.