• A new 1.4 GHz 19-element, dual-polarization, cryogenic phased array feed (PAF) radio astronomy receiver has been developed for the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) as part of FLAG (Focal L-band Array for the GBT) project. Commissioning observations of calibrator radio sources show that this receiver has the lowest reported beamformed system temperature ($T_{\rm sys}$) normalized by aperture efficiency ($\eta$) of any phased array receiver to date. The measured $T_{\rm sys}/\eta$ is $25.4 \pm 2.5$ K near 1350 MHz for the boresight beam, which is comparable to the performance of the current 1.4 GHz cryogenic single feed receiver on the GBT. The degradation in $T_{\rm sys}/\eta$ at $\sim$ 4 arcmin (required for Nyquist sampling) and $\sim$ 8 arcmin offsets from the boresight is, respectively, $\sim$ 1\% and $\sim$ 20\% of the boresight value. The survey speed of the PAF with seven formed beams is larger by a factor between 2.1 and 7 compared to a single beam system depending on the observing application. The measured performance, both in frequency and offset from boresight, qualitatively agree with predictions from a rigorous electromagnetic model of the PAF. The astronomical utility of the receiver is demonstrated by observations of the pulsar B0329+54 and an extended HII region, the Rosette Nebula. The enhanced survey speed with the new PAF receiver will enable the GBT to carry out exciting new science, such as more efficient observations of diffuse, extended neutral hydrogen emission from galactic in-flows and searches for Fast Radio Bursts.
  • We measure carbon radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 5.3 GHz toward four HII regions with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to determine the magnetic field strength in the photodissociation region (PDR) that surrounds the ionized gas. Roshi (2007) suggests that the non-thermal line widths of carbon RRLs from PDRs are predominantly due to magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) waves, thus allowing the magnetic field strength to be derived. We model the PDR with a simple geometry and perform the non-LTE radiative transfer of the carbon RRL emission to solve for the PDR physical properties. Using the PDR mass density from these models and the carbon RRL non-thermal line width we estimate total magnetic field strengths of B ~ 100-300 micro Gauss in W3 and NGC6334A. Our results for W49 and NGC6334D are less well constrained with total magnetic field strengths between B ~ 200-1000 micro Gauss. HI and OH Zeeman measurements of the line-of-sight magnetic field strength (B_los), taken from the literature, are between a factor of ~0.5-1 of the lower bound of our carbon RRL magnetic field strength estimates. Since |B_los| <= B, our results are consistent with the magnetic origin of the non-thermal component of carbon RRL widths.
  • An FPGA-based digital-receiver has been developed for a low-frequency imaging radio interferometer, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). The MWA, located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia, consists of 128 dual-polarized aperture-array elements (tiles) operating between 80 and 300\,MHz, with a total processed bandwidth of 30.72 MHz for each polarization. Radio-frequency signals from the tiles are amplified and band limited using analog signal conditioning units; sampled and channelized by digital-receivers. The signals from eight tiles are processed by a single digital-receiver, thus requiring 16 digital-receivers for the MWA. The main function of the digital-receivers is to digitize the broad-band signals from each tile, channelize them to form the sky-band, and transport it through optical fibers to a centrally located correlator for further processing. The digital-receiver firmware also implements functions to measure the signal power, perform power equalization across the band, detect interference-like events, and invoke diagnostic modes. The digital-receiver is controlled by high-level programs running on a single-board-computer. This paper presents the digital-receiver design, implementation, current status, and plans for future enhancements.
  • The Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has become an integral part of astronomical instrumentation, enabling high-performance online data reduction and accelerated online signal processing. In this paper, we describe a wide-band reconfigurable spectrometer built using an off-the-shelf GPU card. This spectrometer, when configured as a polyphase filter bank (PFB), supports a dual-polarization bandwidth of up to 1.1 GHz (or a single-polarization bandwidth of up to 2.2 GHz) on the latest generation of GPUs. On the other hand, when configured as a direct FFT, the spectrometer supports a dual-polarization bandwidth of up to 1.4 GHz (or a single-polarization bandwidth of up to 2.8 GHz).
  • We present images of C110$\alpha$ and H110$\alpha$ radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 4.8 GHz and images of H166$\alpha$, C166$\alpha$ and X166$\alpha$ RRL emission at 1.4 GHz, observed toward the starforming region NGC 2024. The 1.4 GHz image with angular resolution $\sim$ 70\arcsec\ is obtained using VLA data. The 4.8 GHz image with angular resolution $\sim$ 17\arcsec\ is obtained by combining VLA and GBT data. The similarity of the LSR velocity (10.3 \kms\) of the C110$\alpha$ line to that of lines observed from molecular material located at the far side of the \HII\ region suggests that the photo dissociation region (PDR) responsible for C110$\alpha$ line emission is at the far side. The LSR velocity of C166$\alpha$ is 8.8 \kms. This velocity is comparable with the velocity of molecular absorption lines observed from the foreground gas, suggesting that the PDR is at the near side of the \HII\ region. Non-LTE models for carbon line forming regions are presented. Typical properties of the foreground PDR are $T_{PDR} \sim 100$ K, $n_e^{PDR} \sim 5$ \cmthree, $n_H \sim 1.7 \times 10^4$ \cmthree, path length $l \sim 0.06$ pc and those of the far side PDR are $T_{PDR} \sim$ 200 K, $n_e^{PDR} \sim$ 50 \cmthree, $n_H \sim 1.7 \times 10^5$ \cmthree, $l \sim$ 0.03 pc. Our modeling indicates that the far side PDR is located within the \HII\ region. We estimate magnetic field strength in the foreground PDR to be 60 $\mu$G and that in the far side PDR to be 220 $\mu$G. Our field estimates compare well with the values obtained from OH Zeeman observations toward NGC 2024.
  • A Survey of Ionized Gas in the Galaxy, made with the Arecibo telescope (SIGGMA) uses the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) to fully sample the Galactic plane (30 < l < 75 and -2 < b < 2; 175 < l < 207 and -2 < b < 1) observable with the telescope in radio recombination lines (RRLs). Processed data sets are being produced in the form of data cubes of 2 degree (along l) x 4 degree (along b) x 151 (number of channels), archived and made public. The 151 channels cover a velocity range of 600 km/s and the velocity resolution of the survey changes from 4.2 km/s to 5.1 km/s from the lowest frequency channel to the highest frequency channel, respectively.RRL maps with 3.4 arcmin resolution and line flux density sensitivity of 0.5 mJy will enable us to identify new HII regions, measure their electron temperatures, study the physics of photodissociation regions (PDRs) with carbon RRLs, and investigate the origin of the extended low density medium (ELDM). Twelve Hn{\alpha} lines fall within the 300 MHz bandpass of ALFA; they are resampled to a common velocity resolution to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SN) by a factor of 3 or more and preserve the line width. SIGGMA will produce the most sensitive fully sampled RRL survey to date. Here we discuss the observing and data reduction techniques in detail. A test observation toward the HII region complex S255/S257 has detected Hn{\alpha} and Cn{\alpha} lines with SN>10.
  • A compact steep spectrum radio source (J0535-0452) is located in the sky coincident with a bright optical rim in the HII region NGC1977. J0535-0452 is observed to be $\leq 100$ mas in angular size at 8.44 GHz. The spectrum for the radio source is steep and straight with a spectral index of -1.3 between 330 and 8440 MHz. No 2 \mu m IR counter part for the source is detected. These characteristics indicate that the source may be either a rare high redshift radio galaxy or a millisecond pulsar (MSP). Here we investigate whether the steep spectrum source is a millisecond pulsar.The optical rim is believed to be the interface between the HII region and the adjacent molecular cloud. If the compact source is a millisecond pulsar, it would have eluded detection in previous pulsar surveys because of the extreme scattering due to the HII region--molecular cloud interface. The limits obtained on the angular broadening along with the distance to the scattering screen are used to estimate the pulse broadening. The pulse broadening is shown to be less than a few msec at frequencies $\gtsim$ 5 GHz. We therefore searched for pulsed emission from J0535-0452 at 14.8 and 4.8 GHz with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). No pulsed emission is detected to 55 and 30 \mu Jy level at 4.8 and 14.8 GHz. Based on the parameter space explored by our pulsar search algorithm, we conclude that, if J0535-0452 is a pulsar, then it could only be a binary MSP of orbital period $\ltsim$ 5 hrs.
  • A new spectrometer for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) is being built jointly by the NRAO and the CASPER, University of California, Berkeley. The spectrometer uses 8 bit ADCs and will be capable of processing up to 1.25 GHz bandwidth from 8 dual polarized beams. This mode will be used to process data from focal plane arrays. The spectrometer supports observing mode with 8 tunable digital sub-bands within the 1.25 GHz bandwidth. The spectrometer can also be configured to process a bandwidth of up to 10 GHz with 64 tunable sub-bands from a dual polarized beam. The vastly enhanced backend capabilities will support several new science projects with the GBT.
  • The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) free-free foreground emission map is used to identify diffuse ionized regions (DIR) in the Galaxy (Rahman & Murray 2010). It has been found that the 18 most luminous WMAP sources produce more than half of the total ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy. We observed radio recombination lines (RRLs) toward the luminous WMAP source G49.75-0.45 with the Green Bank Telescope near 1.4 GHz. Hydrogen RRL is detected toward the source but no helium line is detected, implying that n_He+/n_H+ < 0.024. This limit puts severe constraint on the ionizing spectrum. The total ionizing luminosity of G49 (3.05 x 10^51 s^-1) is ~ 2.8 times the luminosity of all radio HII regions within this DIR and this is generally the case for other WMAP sources. Murray & Rahman (2010) propose that the additional ionization is due to massive clusters (~ 7.5 x10^3 Msun for G49) embedded in the WMAP sources. Such clusters should produce enough photons with energy \geq 24.6 eV to fully ionize helium in the DIR. Our observations rule out a simple model with G49 ionized by a massive cluster. We also considered 'leaky' HII region models for the ionization of the DIR, suggested by Lockman and Anantharamaiah, but these models also cannot explain our observations. We estimate that the helium ionizing photons need to be attenuated by > ~10 times to explain the observations. If selective absorption of He- ionizing photons by dust is causing this additional attenuation, then the ratio of dust absorption cross sections for He- and H- ionizing photons should be > ~6.
  • We report here, for the first time, the association of low frequency CRRL with \HI\ self-absorbing clouds in the inner Galaxy and that the CRRLs from the innermost $\sim 10^{\circ}$ of the Galaxy arise in the Riegel-Crutcher (R-C) cloud. The R-C cloud is amongst the most well known of \HI\ self-absorbing (HISA) regions located at a distance of about 125 pc in the Galactic centre direction. Taking the R-C cloud as an example, we demonstrate that the physical properties of the HISA can be constrained by combining multi-frequency CRRL and \HI\ observations. The derived physical properties of the HISA cloud are used to determine the cooling and heating rates. The dominant cooling process is emission of the \CII\ 158 \mum line whereas dominant heating process in the cloud interior is photoelectric emission. Constraints on the FUV flux (G0 $\sim$ 4 to 7) falling on the R-C cloud are obtained by assuming thermal balance between the dominant heating and cooling processes. The H$_2$ formation rate per unit volume in the cloud interior is $\sim$ 10$^{-10}$ -- 10$^{-12}$ s$^{-1}$ \cmthree, which far exceeds the H$_2$ dissociation rate per unit volume. We conclude that the self-absorbing cold \HI\ gas in the R-C cloud may be in the process of converting to the molecular form. The cold \HI\ gas observed as HISA features are ubiquitous in the inner Galaxy and form an important part of the ISM. Our analysis shows that combining CRRL and \HI\ data can give important insight into the nature of these cold gas. We also estimate the integration times required to image the CRRL forming region with the upcoming SKA pathfinders. Imaging with the MWA telescope is feasible with reasonable observing times.
  • We propose a method to study the epoch of reionization based on the possible observation of 2p--2s fine structure lines from the neutral hydrogen outside the cosmological H {\sc ii} regions enveloping QSOs and other ionizing sources in the reionization era. We show that for parameters typical of luminous sources observed at $z \simeq 6.3$ the strength of this signal, which is proportional to the H {\sc i} fraction, has a brightness temperature $\simeq 20 \mu K$ for a fully neutral medium. The fine structure line from this redshift is observable at $\nu \simeq 1 \rm GHz$ and we discuss prospects for the detection with several operational and future radio telescopes. We also compute the characteristics of this signal from the epoch of recombination: the peak brightness is expected to be $\simeq 100 \mu K$; this signal appears in the frequency range 5-10 MHz. The signal from the recombination era is nearly impossible to detect owing to the extreme brightness of the Galactic emission at these frequencies.
  • We report multifrequency radio continuum and hydrogen radio recombination line observations of HII regions near l=24.8d b=0.1d using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 1.28 GHz (n=172), 0.61 GHz (n=220) and the Very Large Array (VLA) at 1.42 GHz (n=166). The region consists of a large number of resolved HII regions and a few compact HII regions as seen in our continuum maps, many of which have associated infrared (IR) point sources. The largest HII region at l=24.83d and b=0.1d is a few arcmins in size and has a shell-type morphology. It is a massive HII region enclosing ~ 550 solar mass with a linear size of 7 pc and an rms electron density of ~ 110 cm^-3 at a kinematic distance of 6 kpc. The required ionization can be provided by a single star of spectral type O5.5. We also report detection of hydrogen recombination lines from the HII region at l=24.83d and b=0.1d at all observed frequencies near Vlsr=100 km/s. We model the observed integrated line flux density as arising in the diffuse HII region and find that the best fitting model has an electron density comparable to that derived from the continuum. We also report detection of hydrogen recombination lines from two other HII regions in the field.
  • Several indirect evidences indicate a magnetic origin for the non-thermal width of spectral lines observed toward molecular clouds. In this letter, I suggest that the origin of the non-thermal width of carbon recombination lines (CRLs) observed from photo-dissociation regions (PDRs) near ultra-compact \HII\ regions is magnetic and that the magnitude of the line width is an estimate of the \alfven speed. The magnetic field strengths estimated based on this suggestion compare well with those measured toward molecular clouds with densities similar to PDR densities. I conclude that multi-frequency CRL observations have the potential to form a new tool to determine the field strength near star forming regions.
  • We have detected C91$\alpha$ (8.5891 GHz) emission toward 4 ultra-compact \HII regions (\UCHII s; W49G, J, L & C) in the W49 North massive star forming region with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 3\arcsec resolution. No carbon line emission was detected toward \UCHII s W49F, A, O, S and Q at this frequency to a 3$\sigma$ level of 2 mJy. We also observed the same region in the C75$\alpha$ line (15.3 GHz) with no detection at a 3$\sigma$ level of 6 mJy with a 1\arcsec.7 beam. Detection of line emission toward these sources add supporting data to the earlier result of \nocite{retal05a}Roshi et al (2005a) that many \UCHII s have an associated photo-dissociation region (PDR). Similarity of the LSR velocities of carbon recombination lines and H$_2$CO absorption toward \UCHII s in W49 North suggests that the PDRs reside in the dense interface zone surrounding these \HII regions. Combining the observed carbon line parameters at 8.6 GHz with the upper limits on line emission at 15.3 GHz, we obtain constraints on the physical properties of the PDRs associated with W49G and J. The upper limit on the number density of hydrogen molecule obtained from carbon line models is $\sim$ $5 \times 10^6$ \cmthree.
  • Increasing levels of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) are a problem for research in radio astronomy. Various techniques to suppress RFI and extract astronomical signals from data affected by interference are being tried out. However, extracting weak astronomical signals in the spectral region affected by RFI remains a technological challenge. In this paper, we describe the construction of an experimental setup at the Raman Research Institute (RRI), Bangalore, India for research in RFI mitigation. We also present some results of tests done on the data collected using this setup. The experimental setup makes use of the 1.42 GHz receiver system of the 10.4 m telescope at RRI. A new reference antenna, its receiver system and a backend for recording digitized voltage together with the 1.42 GHz receiver system form the experimental setup. We present the results of the characterization of the experimental setup. An off-line adaptive filter was successfully implemented and tested using the data obtained with the experimental setup.
  • Using the Very Large Array (VLA) the C76$\alpha$ and C53$\alpha$ recombination lines (RLs) have been detected toward the ultra-compact \HII\ region (UCHII region) G35.20$-$1.74. We also obtained upper limits to the carbon RLs at 6 cm (C110$\alpha$ & C111$\alpha$) and 3.6 cm (C92$\alpha$) wavelengths with the VLA. In addition, continuum images of the W48A complex (which includes G35.20$-$1.74) are made with angular resolutions in the range 14\arcsec to 2\arcsec. Modeling the multi-wavelength line and continuum data has provided the physical properties of the UCHII region and the photodissociation region (PDR) responsible for the carbon RL emission. The gas pressure in the PDR, estimated using the derived physical properties, is at least four times larger than that in the UCHII region. The dominance of stimulated emission of carbon RLs near 2 cm, as implied by our models, is used to study the relative motion of the PDR with respect to the molecular cloud and ionized gas. Our results from the kinematical study are consistent with a pressure-confined UCHII region with the ionizing star moving with respect to the molecular cloud. However, based on the existing data, other models to explain the extended lifetime and morphology of UCHII regions cannot be ruled out.
  • We present the results of a search for the ground state hyperfine transition of the OH radical near 53 MHz using the National MST Radar Facility at Gadanki, India. The observed position was G48.4$-$1.4 near the Galactic plane. The OH line is not detected. We place a 3$\sigma$ upper limit for the line flux density at 39 Jy from our observations. We also did not detect recombination lines (RLs) of carbon, which were within the frequency range of our observations. The 3$\sigma$ upper limit of 20 Jy obtained for the flux density of carbon RL, along with observations at 34.5 and 327 MHz are used to constrain the physical properties of the line forming region. Our upper limit is consistent with the line emission expected from a partially ionized region with electron temperature, density and path lengths in the range 20 -- 300 K, 0.03 -- 0.3 cm$^{-3}$ and 0.1 -- 170 pc respectively.
  • We report here on a survey of carbon recombination lines (RLs) near 8.5 GHz toward 17 ultra-compact \HII regions (\UCHII s). Carbon RLs are detected in 11 directions, indicating the presence of dense photodissociation regions (PDRs) associated with the \UCHII s. In this paper, we show that the carbon RLs provide important, complementary information on the kinematics and physical properties of the ambient medium near \UCHII s. Non-LTE models for the carbon line forming region are developed, assuming that the PDRs surround the \UCHII s, and we constrained the model parameters by multi-frequency RL data. Modeling shows that carbon RL emission near 8.5 GHz is dominated by stimulated emission and hence we preferentially observe the PDR material that is in front of the \UCHII continuum. We find that the relative motion between ionized gas and the associated PDR is about half that estimated earlier, and has an RMS velocity difference of 3.3 \kms. Our models also give estimates for the PDR density and pressure. We found that the neutral density of PDRs is typically $>$ 5 $\times$ 10$^5$ \cmthree and \UCHII s can be embedded in regions with high ambient pressure. Our results are consistent with a pressure confined \HII region model where the stars are moving relative to the cloud core. Other models cannot be ruled out, however. Interestingly, in most cases, the PDR pressure is an order of magnitude larger than the pressure of the ionized gas. Further investigation is needed to understand this large pressure difference.
  • A survey of radio recombination lines (RLs) in the Galactic plane ($l = $ 332\deg $\to$ 89\deg) near 327 MHz made using the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) has detected carbon RLs from all the positions in the longitude range 0\deg $< l < $ 20\deg and from a few positions at other longitudes. The carbon RLs detected in this survey originate from ``diffuse'' \CII regions. Comparison of the \lv diagram and the radial distribution of carbon line emission with those obtained from hydrogen RLs near 3 cm from \HII regions and ``intense'' \CO emission indicates that the distribution of the diffuse \CII regions in the inner Galaxy is similar to that of spiral arm components. Towards several observed positions, the central velocities of the carbon RLs coincide with \HI self-absorption features suggesting an association of diffuse \CII regions with cool \HI. The observed widths of the lines from the two species are, however, different. We discuss possible reasons for the difference in the line widths.