• Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are one of the primary manifestations of solar activity and can drive severe space weather effects. Therefore, it is vital to work towards being able to predict their occurrence. However, many aspects of CME formation and eruption remain unclear, including whether magnetic flux ropes are present before the onset of eruption and the key mechanisms that cause CMEs to occur. In this work, the pre-eruptive coronal configuration of an active region that produced an interplanetary CME with a clear magnetic flux rope structure at 1 AU is studied. A forward-S sigmoid appears in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) data two hours before the onset of the eruption (SOL2012-06-14), which is interpreted as a signature of a right-handed flux rope that formed prior to the eruption. Flare ribbons and EUV dimmings are used to infer the locations of the flux rope footpoints. These locations, together with observations of the global magnetic flux distribution, indicate that an interaction between newly emerged magnetic flux and pre-existing sunspot field in the days prior to the eruption may have enabled the coronal flux rope to form via tether-cutting-like reconnection. Composition analysis suggests that the flux rope had a coronal plasma composition, supporting our interpretation that the flux rope formed via magnetic reconnection in the corona. Once formed, the flux rope remained stable for 2 hours before erupting as a CME.
  • Near-surface flows measured by the ring-diagram technique of local helioseismology show structures that persist over multiple rotations. We examine these phenomena using data from the {\em Global Oscillation Network Group} (GONG) and the {\em Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager} (HMI) and show that a correlation analysis of the structures can be used to estimate the rotation rate as a function of latitude, giving a result consistent with the near-surface rate from global helioseismology and slightly slower than that obtained from a similar analysis of the surface magnetic field strength. At latitudes of 60$^{\circ}$ and above the HMI flow data reveal a strong signature of a two-sided zonal flow structure. This signature may be related to recent reports of "giant cells" in solar convection.
  • Persistent plasma upflows were observed with Hinode's EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) at the edges of active region (AR) 10978 as it crossed the solar disk. We analyze the evolution of the photospheric magnetic and velocity fields of the AR, model its coronal magnetic field, and compute the location of magnetic null-points and quasi-sepratrix layers (QSLs) searching for the origin of EIS upflows. Magnetic reconnection at the computed null points cannot explain all of the observed EIS upflow regions. However, EIS upflows and QSLs are found to evolve in parallel, both temporarily and spatially. Sections of two sets of QSLs, called outer and inner, are found associated to EIS upflow streams having different characteristics. The reconnection process in the outer QSLs is forced by a large-scale photospheric flow pattern which is present in the AR for several days. We propose a scenario in which upflows are observed provided a large enough asymmetry in plasma pressure exists between the pre-reconnection loops and for as long as a photospheric forcing is at work. A similar mechanism operates in the inner QSLs, in this case, it is forced by the emergence and evolution of the bipoles between the two main AR polarities. Our findings provide strong support to the results from previous individual case studies investigating the role of magnetic reconnection at QSLs as the origin of the upflowing plasma. Furthermore, we propose that persistent reconnection along QSLs does not only drive the EIS upflows, but it is also responsible for a continuous metric radio noise-storm observed in AR 10978 along its disk transit by the Nan\c{c}ay Radio Heliograph.
  • We present the discovery of 49 new photometrically classified T dwarfs from the combination of large infrared and optical surveys combined with follow-up TNG photometry. We used multi-band infrared and optical photometry from the UKIRT and Sloan Digital Sky Surveys to identify possible brown dwarf candidates, which were then confirmed using methane filter photometry. We have defined a new photometric conversion between CH4s - CH4l colour and spectral type for T4 to T8 brown dwarfs based on a part of the sample that has been followed up using methane photometry and spectroscopy. Using methane differential photometry as a proxy for spectral type for T dwarfs has proved to be a very efficient technique. Of a subset of 45 methane selected brown dwarfs that were observed spectroscopically, 100% were confirmed as T dwarfs. Future deep imaging surveys will produce large samples of faint brown dwarf candidates, for which spectroscopy will not be feasible. When broad wavelength coverage is unavailable, methane imaging offers a means to efficiently classify candidates from such surveys using just a pair of near-infrared images.
  • As an observational case study, we consider the origin of a prominent poleward surge of leading polarity, visible in the magnetic butterfly diagram during Solar Cycle 24. A new technique is developed for assimilating individual regions of strong magnetic flux into a surface flux transport model. By isolating the contribution of each of these regions, the model shows the surge to originate primarily in a single high-latitude activity group consisting of a bipolar active region present in Carrington Rotations 2104-05 (November 2010-January 2011) and a multipolar active region in Rotations 2107-08 (February-April 2011). This group had a strong axial dipole moment opposed to Joy's law. On the other hand, the modelling suggests that the transient influence of this group on the butterfly diagram will not be matched by a large long-term contribution to the polar field, because of its location at high latitude. This is in accordance with previous flux transport models.
  • Solar coronal plasma composition is typically characterized by first ionization potential (FIP) bias. Using spectra obtained by Hinode's EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument, we present a series of large-scale, spatially resolved composition maps of active region (AR) 11389. The composition maps show how FIP bias evolves within the decaying AR from 2012 January 4-6. Globally, FIP bias decreases throughout the AR. We analyzed areas of significant plasma composition changes within the decaying AR and found that small-scale evolution in the photospheric magnetic field is closely linked to the FIP bias evolution observed in the corona. During the AR's decay phase, small bipoles emerging within supergranular cells reconnect with the pre-existing AR field, creating a pathway along which photospheric and coronal plasmas can mix. The mixing time scales are shorter than those of plasma enrichment processes. Eruptive activity also results in shifting the FIP bias closer to photospheric in the affected areas. Finally, the FIP bias still remains dominantly coronal only in a part of the AR's high-flux density core. We conclude that in the decay phase of an AR's lifetime, the FIP bias is becoming increasingly modulated by episodes of small-scale flux emergence, i.e. decreasing the AR's overall FIP bias. Our results show that magnetic field evolution plays an important role in compositional changes during AR development, revealing a more complex relationship than expected from previous well-known Skylab results showing that FIP bias increases almost linearly with age in young ARs (Widing $\&$ Feldman, 2001, ApJ, 555, 426).
  • Recent studies show that active-region (AR) upflowing plasma, observed by the EUV-Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), onboard Hinode, can gain access to open field-lines and be released into the solar wind (SW) via magnetic-interchange reconnection at magnetic null-points in pseudo-streamer configurations. When only one bipolar AR is present on the Sun and it is fully covered by the separatrix of a streamer, such as AR 10978 in December 2007, it seems unlikely that the upflowing AR plasma can find its way into the slow SW. However, signatures of plasma with AR composition have been found at 1 AU by Culhane et al. (2014) apparently originating from the West of AR 10978. We present a detailed topology analysis of AR 10978 and the surrounding large-scale corona based on a potential-field source-surface (PFSS) model. Our study shows that it is possible for the AR plasma to get around the streamer separatrix and be released into the SW via magnetic reconnection, occurring in at least two main steps. We analyse data from the Nan\c{c}ay Radioheliograph (NRH) searching for evidence of the chain of magnetic reconnections proposed. We find a noise storm above the AR and several varying sources at 150.9 MHz. Their locations suggest that they could be associated with particles accelerated during the first-step reconnection process and at a null point well outside of the AR. However, we find no evidence of the second-step reconnection in the radio data. Our results demonstrate that even when it appears highly improbable for the AR plasma to reach the SW, indirect channels involving a sequence of reconnections can make it possible.
  • Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) erupt and expand in a magnetically structured solar corona. Various indirect observational pieces of evidence have shown that the magnetic field of CMEs reconnects with surrounding magnetic fields, forming, e.g., dimming regions distant from the CME source regions. Analyzing Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations of the eruption from AR 11226 on 2011 June 7, we present the first direct evidence of coronal magnetic reconnection between the fields of two adjacent ARs during a CME. The observations are presented jointly with a data-constrained numerical simulation, demonstrating the formation/intensification of current sheets along a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) at the interface between the CME and the neighbouring AR 11227. Reconnection resulted in the formation of new magnetic connections between the erupting magnetic structure from AR 11226 and the neighboring active region AR 11227 about 200 Mm from the eruption site. The onset of reconnection first becomes apparent in the SDO/AIA images when filament plasma, originally contained within the erupting flux rope, is re-directed towards remote areas in AR 11227, tracing the change of large-scale magnetic connectivity. The location of the coronal reconnection region becomes bright and directly observable at SDO/AIA wavelengths, owing to the presence of down-flowing cool, dense (10^{10} cm^{-3}) filament plasma in its vicinity. The high-density plasma around the reconnection region is heated to coronal temperatures, presumably by slow-mode shocks and Coulomb collisions. These results provide the first direct observational evidence that CMEs reconnect with surrounding magnetic structures, leading to a large-scale re-configuration of the coronal magnetic field.
  • Seeking to establish whether active region upflow material contributes to the slow solar wind, we examine in detail the plasma upflows from Active Region (AR)10978, which crossed the Sun's disc in the interval 8 to 16 December, 2007 during Carrington rotation (CR)2064. In previous work, using data from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer, upflow velocity evolution was extensively studied as the region crossed the disc while a linear force-free magnetic extrapolation was used to confirm aspects of the velocity evolution and to establish the presence of quasi-separatrix layers at the upflow source areas. The plasma properties, temperature, density and first ionisation potential bias (FIP-bias) were measured with the spectrometer during the disc passage of the active region. Global potential field source surface (PFSS) models showed that AR 10978 was completely covered by the closed field of a helmet streamer that is part of the streamer belt. Thus it is not clear how any of the upflowing AR-associated plasma could reach the source surface at 2.5 R(Sun)and contribute to the slow solar wind. However a detailed examination of solar-wind in-situ data obtained by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft at the L1 point shows that the increase in O^7+/O^6+, C^6+/C^5+ and Fe/O - a FIP-bias proxy - are present before the heliospheric current sheet crossing. These increases, along with an accompanying reduction in proton velocity and an increase in density are characteristic of both AR and slow-wind plasma. Finally we describe a two-step reconnection process by which some of the upflowing plasma from the AR could reach the heliosphere.
  • Using spectra obtained by the EIS instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359 arcsec x 485 arcsec. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the AR age, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configfiuration.
  • We report the discovery of 76 new T dwarfs from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey (LAS). Near-infrared broad and narrow-band photometry and spectroscopy are presented for the new objects, along with WISE and warm-Spitzer photometry. Proper motions for 128 UKIDSS T dwarfs are presented from a new two epoch LAS proper motion catalogue. We use these motions to identify two new benchmark systems: LHS 6176AB, a T8+M4 pair and HD118865AB, a T5.5+F8 pair. Using age constraints from the primaries and evolutionary models to constrain the radii we have estimated their physical properties from their bolometric luminosity. We compare the colours and properties of known benchmark T dwarfs to the latest model atmospheres and draw two principal conclusions. Firstly, it appears that the H - [4.5] and J - W2 colours are more sensitive to metallicity than has previously been recognised, such that differences in metallicity may dominate over differences in Teff when considering relative properties of cool objects using these colours. Secondly, the previously noted apparent dominance of young objects in the late-T dwarf sample is no longer apparent when using the new model grids and the expanded sample of late-T dwarfs and benchmarks. This is supported by the apparently similar distribution of late-T dwarfs and earlier-type T dwarfs on reduced proper motion diagrams that we present. Finally, we present updated space densities for the late-T dwarfs, and compare our values to simulation predictions and those from WISE.
  • We analyse the evolution of coronal plasma upflows from the edges of AR 10978, which has the best limb-to-limb data coverage with Hinode's EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). We find that the observed evolution is largely due to the solar rotation progressively changing the viewpoint of nearly stationary flows. From the systematic changes in the upflow regions as a function of distance from disc centre, we deduce their 3D geometrical properties as inclination and angular spread in three coronal lines (SiVII, FeXII, FeXV). In agreement with magnetic extrapolations, we find that the flows are thin, fan-like structures rooted in quasi separatrix layers (QSLs). The fans are tilted away from the AR centre. The highest plasma velocities in these three spectral lines have similar magnitudes and their heights increase with temperature. The spatial location and extent of the upflow regions in the SiVII, FeXII and FeXV lines are different owing to (i) temperature stratification and (ii) line of sight integration of the spectral profiles with significantly different backgrounds. We conclude that we sample the same flows at different temperatures. Further, we find that the evolution of line widths during the disc passage is compatible with a broad range of velocities in the flows. Everything considered, our results are compatible with the AR upflows originating from reconnections along QSLs between over-pressure AR loops and neighboring under-pressure loops. The flows are driven along magnetic field lines by a pressure gradient in a stratified atmosphere. We propose that, at any given time, we observe the superposition of flows created by successive reconnections, leading to a broad velocity distribution.
  • We have carried out a search for late-type T dwarfs in the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey 6th Data Release. The search yielded two persuasive candidates, both of which have been confirmed as T dwarfs. The brightest, UGPS J0521+3640 has been assigned the spectral type T8.5 and appears to lie at a distance of 7-9 pc. The fainter of the two, UGPS J0652+0324, is classified as a T5.5 dwarf, and lies at an estimated distance of 28-37 pc. Warm-Spitzer observations in IRAC channels 1 and 2, taken as part of the GLIMPSE360 Legacy Survey, are available for UGPS J0521+3640 and we used these data with the near-infrared spectroscopy to estimate its properties. We find best fitting solar metallicity BT-Settl models for Teff = 600K and 650K and log g = 4.5 and 5.0. These parameters suggest a mass of between 14 and 32 MJup for an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The proximity of this very cool T dwarf, and its location in the Galactic plane makes it an ideal candidate for high resolution adaptive optics imaging to search for cool companions.
  • Recent observations of sunspot light-bridges have shed new light on the fact that they are often associated with significant chromospheric activity. In particular chromospheric jets (Shimizu et al. 2009) persisting over a period of days have been identifies, sometimes associated with large downflows at the photospheric level (Louis et al. 2009). One possible explanation for this activity is reconnection low in the atmosphere. Light-bridges have also been associated with a constant brightness enhancement in the 1600 angstroms passband of TRACE, and the heating of 1 MK loops. Using data from EIS, SOT and STEREO EUVI we investigate the response of the transition region and lower corona to the presence of a light-bridge and specific periods of chromospheric activity.
  • Outflows of plasma at the edges of active regions surrounded by quiet Sun are now a common observation with the Hinode satellite. While there is observational evidence to suggest that the outflows are originating in the magnetic field surrounding the active regions, there is no conclusive evidence that reveals how they are driven. Motivated by observations of outflows at the periphery of a mature active region embedded in a coronal hole, we have used a three-dimensional simulation to emulate the active region's development in order to investigate the origin and driver of these outflows. We find outflows are accelerated from a site in the coronal hole magnetic field immediately surrounding the active region and are channelled along the coronal hole field as they rise through the atmosphere. The plasma is accelerated simply as a result of the active region expanding horizontally as it develops. Many of the characteristics of the outflows generated in the simulation are consistent with those of observed outflows: velocities up to 45 km per sec, properties akin to the coronal hole, proximity to the active region's draining loops, expansion with height, and projection over monopolar photospheric magnetic concentrations. Although the horizontal expansion occurs as a consequence of the active region's development in the simulation, expansion is also a general feature of established active regions. Hence, it is entirely possible and plausible that the expansion acceleration mechanism displayed in the simulation is occurring in active regions on the Sun and, in addition to reconnection, is driving the outflows observed at their edges.
  • Combining STEREO, ACE and Hinode observations has presented an opportunity to follow a filament eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME) on the 17th of October 2007 from an active region (AR) inside a coronal hole (CH) into the heliosphere. This particular combination of `open' and closed magnetic topologies provides an ideal scenario for interchange reconnection to take place. With Hinode and STEREO data we were able to identify the emergence time and type of structure seen in the in-situ data four days later. On the 21st, ACE observed in-situ the passage of an ICME with `open' magnetic topology. The magnetic field configuration of the source, a mature AR located inside an equatorial CH, has important implications for the solar and interplanetary signatures of the eruption. We interpret the formation of an `anemone' structure of the erupting AR and the passage in-situ of the ICME being disconnected at one leg, as manifested by uni-directional suprathermal electron flux in the ICME, to be a direct result of interchange reconnection between closed loops of the CME originating from the AR and `open' field lines of the surrounding CH.
  • Hinode's EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) has discovered ubiquitous outflows of a few to 50 km/sec from active regions (ARs). These outflows are most prominent at the AR boundary and appear over monopolar magnetic areas. They are linked to strong non-thermal line broadening and are stronger in hotter EUV lines. The outflows persist for at least several days. Using Hinode EIS and X-Ray Telescope observations of AR 10942 coupled with magnetic modeling, we demonstrate that the outflows originate from specific locations of the magnetic topology where field lines display strong gradients of magnetic connectivity, namely quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs), or in the limit of infinitely thin QSLs, separatrices. We found the strongest AR outflows to be in the vicinity of QSL sections located over areas of strong magnetic field. We argue that magnetic reconnection at QSLs separating closed field lines of the AR and either large-scale externally connected or `open' field lines is a viable mechanism for driving AR outflows which are likely sources of the slow solar wind.
  • Project GRAND is an extensive air shower array of proportional wire chambers. It has 64 stations in a 100m x 100m area; each station has eight planes of proportional wire chambers with a 50 mm steel absorber plate above the bottom two planes. This arrangement of planes, each 1.25 square meters of area, allow an angular measurement for each track to 0.25 degrees in each of two projections. The steel absorber plate allows a measurement of the identity of each muon track to 96% accuracy. Two data-taking triggers allow data to be simultaneously taken for a) extensive air showers (multiple coincidence station hits) at about 1 Hz and b) single muons (single tracks of identified muons) at 2000 Hz. Eight on-line computers pre-analyze the single track data and store the results on magnetic tape in compacted form with a minimum of computer dead-time. One additional computer reads data from the shower triggers and records this raw data on a separate magnetic tape with no pre-analysis.