• We present switching field distributions of spin-transfer assisted magnetization reversal in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni multilayer spin-valve nanopillars at room temperature. Switching field measurements of the Co/Ni free layer of spin-valve nanopillars with a 50 nm x 300 nm ellipse cross section were conducted as a function of current. The validity of a model that assumes a spin-current dependent effective barrier for thermally activated reversal is tested by measuring switching field distributions under applied direct currents. We show that the switching field distributions deviate significantly from the double exponential shape predicted by the effective barrier model, beginning at applied currents as low as half of the zero field critical current. Barrier heights extracted from switching field distributions for currents below this threshold are a monotonic function of the current. However, the thermally-induced switching model breaks down for currents exceeding the critical threshold.
  • We present a study of the temperature dependence of the switching fields in Co/Ni-based perpendicularly magnetized spin-valves. While magnetization reversal of all-perpendicular Co/Ni spin valves at ambient temperatures is typically marked by a single sharp step change in resistance, low temperature measurements can reveal a series of resistance steps, consistent with non-uniform magnetization configurations. We propose a model that consists of domain nucleation, propagation and annihilation to explain the temperature dependence of the switching fields. Interestingly, low temperature (<30 K) step changes in resistance that we associate with domain nucleation, have a bimodal switching field and resistance step distribution, attributable to two competing nucleation pathways.
  • We present temperature dependent switching measurements of the Co/Ni multilayered free element of 75 nm diameter spin-valve nanopillars. Angular dependent hysteresis measurements as well as switching field measurements taken at low temperature are in agreement with a model of thermal activation over a perpendicular anisotropy barrier. However, the statistics of switching (mean switching field and switching variance) from 20 K up to 400 K are in disagreement with a N\'{e}el-Brown model that assumes a temperature independent barrier height and anisotropy field. We introduce a modified N\'{e}el-Brown model thats fit the experimental data in which we take a $T^{3/2}$ dependence to the barrier height and the anisotropy field due to the temperature dependent magnetization and anisotropy energy.
  • We present a two-current-pulse temporal correlation experiment to study the intrinsic subnanosecond nonequilibrium magnetic dynamics of a nanomagnet during and following a pulse excitation. This method is applied to a model spin-transfer system, a spin valve nanopillar with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Two-pulses separated by a short delay (< 500 ps) are shown to lead to the same switching probability as a single pulse with a duration that depends on the delay. This demonstrates a remarkable symmetry between magnetic excitation and relaxation and provides a direct measurement of the magnetic relaxation time. The results are consistent with a simple finite temperature Fokker-Planck macrospin model of the dynamics, suggesting more coherent magnetization dynamics in this short time nonequilibrium limit than near equilibrium.
  • The effect of thermal fluctuations on spin-transfer switching has been studied for a broad range of time scales (sub-ns to seconds) in a model system, a uniaxial thin film nanomagnet. The nanomagnet is incorporated into a spin-valve nanopillar, which is subject to spin-polarized current pulses of variable amplitude and duration. Two physical regimes are clearly distinguished: a long pulse duration regime, in which reversal occurs by spin-transfer assisted thermal activation over an energy barrier, and a short time large pulse amplitude regime, in which the switching probability is determined by the spin angular momentum in the current pulse.