• We have used small-angle-neutron-scattering (SANS) and ac magnetic susceptibility to investigate the global magnetic field H vs temperature T phase diagram of a single crystal Nb in which a first-order transition of Bragg-glass melting (disordering), a peak effect, and surface superconductivity are all observable. It was found that the disappearance of the peak effect is directly related to a multicritical behavior in the Bragg-glass transition. Four characteristic phase boundary lines have been identified on the H-T plane: a first-order line at high fields, a mean-field-like continuous transition line at low fields, and two continuous transition line associated with the onset of surface and bulk superconductivity. All four lines are found to meet at a multicritical point.
  • We report the first observation of a striking history dependence of the structure function of the vortex matter in the peak effect regime in a Nb single crystal by using small angle neutron scattering combined with {\it in situ} magnetic susceptibility measurements. Metastable phases of vortex matter, supercooled vortex liquid and superheated vortex solid, have been identified. We interpret our results as direct structural evidence for a first-order solid-liquid transition at the peak effect.
  • Neutron powder diffraction measurements, combined with magnetization and resistivity data, have been carried out in the doped perovskite La$_{1-x}$Ca$_x$MnO$_3$ ($x=0.47$, 0.50, and 0.53) to elucidate the structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of the system around the composition corresponding to an equal number of Mn3+ and Mn4+. At room temperature all three samples are paramagnetic and single phase, with crystallographic symmetry Pnma. The samples then all become ferromagnetic (FM) at $T_C\approx 265$ K. At $\sim 230$ K, however, a second distinct crystallographic phase (denoted A-II) begins to form. Initially the intrinsic widths of the peaks are quite large, but they narrow as the temperature decreases and the phase fraction increases, indicating microscopic coexistence. The fraction of the sample that exhibits the A-II phase increases with decreasing temperature and also increases with increasing Ca doping, but the transition never goes to completion to the lowest temperatures measured (5 K) and the two phases therefore coexist in this temperature-composition regime. Phase A-II orders antiferromagnetically (AFM) below a N\'{e}el temperature $T_N \approx 160$ K, with the CE-type magnetic structure. Resistivity measurements show that this phase is a conductor, while the CE phase is insulating. Application of magnetic fields up to 9 T progressively inhibits the formation of the A-II phase, but this suppression is path dependent, being much stronger for example if the sample is field-cooled compared to zero-field cooling and then applying the field. The H-T phase diagram obtained from the diffraction measurements is in good agreement with the results of magnetization and resistivity.
  • Neutron scattering from copper benzoate, Cu(C6D5COO)2 3D2O, provides the first direct experimental evidence for field-dependent incommensurate low energy modes in a one-dimensional spin S = 1/2 antiferromagnet. Soft modes occur for wavevectors q=\pi +- dq(H) where dq(H) ~ 2 \pi M(H)/g\mu_B as predicted by Bethe ansatz and spinon descriptions of the S = 1/2 chain. Unexpected was a field-induced energy gap $\Delta(H) \propto H^\alpha$, where $\alpha = 0.65(3)$ as determined from specific heat measurements. At H = 7 T (g\mu_B H/J = 0.52), the magnitude of the gap varies from 0.06 - 0.3 J depending on the orientation of the applied field.