• We present spatially-resolved Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 870 $\mu$m dust continuum maps of six massive, compact, dusty star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at $z\sim2.5$. These galaxies are selected for their small rest-frame optical sizes ($r_{\rm e, F160W}\sim1.6$ kpc) and high stellar-mass densities that suggest that they are direct progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at $z\sim2$. The deep observations yield high far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of L$_{\rm IR}=10^{12.3-12.8}$ L$_{\odot}$ and star formation rates (SFRs) of SFR$=200-700$ M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$, consistent with those of typical star-forming "main sequence" galaxies. The high-spatial resolution (FWHM$\sim$0.12"-0.18") ALMA and HST photometry are combined to construct deconvolved, mean radial profiles of their stellar mass and (UV+IR) SFR. We find that the dusty, nuclear IR-SFR overwhelmingly dominates the bolometric SFR up to $r\sim5$ kpc, by a factor of over 100$\times$ from the unobscured UV-SFR. Furthermore, the effective radius of the mean SFR profile ($r_{\rm e, SFR}\sim1$ kpc) is $\sim$30% smaller than that of the stellar mass profile. The implied structural evolution, if such nuclear starburst last for the estimated gas depletion time of $\Delta t=\pm100$ Myr, is a 4$\times$ increase of the stellar mass density within the central 1 kpc and a 1.6$\times$ decrease of the half-mass radius. This structural evolution fully supports dissipation-driven, formation scenarios in which strong nuclear starbursts transform larger, star-forming progenitors into compact quiescent galaxies.
  • We introduce a new color-selection technique to identify high-redshift, massive galaxies that are systematically missed by Lyman-break selection. The new selection is based on the H_{160} and IRAC 4.5um bands, specifically H - [4.5] > 2.25 mag. These galaxies, dubbed "HIEROs", include two major populations that can be separated with an additional J - H color. The populations are massive and dusty star-forming galaxies at z > 3 (JH-blue) and extremely dusty galaxies at z < 3 (JH-red). The 350 arcmin^2 of the GOODS-N and GOODS-S fields with the deepest HST/WFC3 and IRAC data contain 285 HIEROs down to [4.5] < 24 mag. We focus here primarily on JH-blue (z > 3) HIEROs, which have a median photometric redshift z ~4.4 and stellar massM_{*}~10^{10.6} Msun, and are much fainter in the rest-frame UV than similarly massive Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). Their star formation rates (SFRs) reaches ~240 Msun yr^{-1} leading to a specific SFR, sSFR ~4.2 Gyr^{-1}, suggesting that the sSFRs for massive galaxies continue to grow at z > 2 but at a lower growth rate than from z=0 to z=2. With a median half-light radius of 2 kpc, including ~20% as compact as quiescent galaxies at similar redshifts, JH-blue HIEROs represent perfect star-forming progenitors of the most massive (M_{*} > 10^{11.2} Msun) compact quiescent galaxies at z ~ 3 and have the right number density. HIEROs make up ~60% of all galaxies with M_{*} > 10^{10.5} Msun identified at z > 3 from their photometric redshifts. This is five times more than LBGs with nearly no overlap between the two populations. While HIEROs make up 15-25% of the total SFR density at z ~ 4-5, they completely dominate the SFR density taking place in M_{*} >10^{10.5} Msun galaxies, and are therefore crucial to understanding the very early phase of massive galaxy formation.
  • We study the evolution of the core (r<1 kpc) and effective (r<r_e) stellar-mass surface densities, in star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Since z=3, both populations occupy distinct, linear relations in log(Sigma_e) and log(Sigma_1) vs. log(M). These structural relations exhibit slopes and scatter that remain almost constant with time while their normalizations decline. For SFGs, the normalization declines by less than a factor of 2 from z=3, in both Sigma_e and Sigma_1. Such mild declines suggest that SFGs build dense cores by growing along these relations. We define this evolution as the structural main sequence (Sigma-MS). Quiescent galaxies follow different relations (Sigma^Q_e, Sigma^Q_1) off the Sigma-MS by having higher densities than SFGs of the same mass and redshift. The normalization of Sigma^Q_e declines by a factor of 10 since z=3, but only a factor of 2 in Sigma^Q_1. Thus, the common denominator for quiescent galaxies at all redshifts is the presence of a dense stellar core, and the formation of such cores in SFGs is the main requirement for quenching. Expressed in 2D as deviations off the SFR-MS and off Sigma^Q_1 at each redshift, the distribution of massive galaxies forms a universal, L-shaped sequence that relates two fundamental physical processes: compaction and quenching. Compaction is a process of substantial core-growth in SFGs relative to that in the Sigma-MS. This process increases the core-to-total mass and Sersic index, thereby, making compact SFGs. Quenching occurs once compact SFGs reach a maximum central density above Sigma^Q_1 > 9.5 M_sun/kpc^2. This threshold provides the most effective selection criterion to identify the star-forming progenitors of quiescent galaxies at all redshifts.
  • We present Keck-I MOSFIRE spectroscopy in the Y and H bands of GDN-8231, a massive, compact, star-forming galaxy (SFG) at a redshift $z\sim1.7$. Its spectrum reveals both H$_{\alpha}$ and [NII] emission lines and strong Balmer absorption lines. The H$_{\alpha}$ and Spitzer MIPS 24 $\mu$m fluxes are both weak, thus indicating a low star formation rate of SFR $\lesssim5-10$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$. This, added to a relatively young age of $\sim700$ Myr measured from the absorption lines, provides the first direct evidence for a distant galaxy being caught in the act of rapidly shutting down its star formation. Such quenching allows GDN-8231 to become a compact, quiescent galaxy, similar to 3 other galaxies in our sample, by $z\sim1.5$. Moreover, the color profile of GDN-8231 shows a bluer center, consistent with the predictions of recent simulations for an early phase of inside-out quenching. Its line-of-sight velocity dispersion for the gas, $\sigma^{\rm{gas}}_{\!_{\rm LOS}}=127\pm32$ km s$^{-1}$, is nearly 40% smaller than that of its stars, $\sigma^{\star}_{\!_{\rm LOS}}=215\pm35$ km s$^{-1}$. High-resolution hydro-simulations of galaxies explain such apparently colder gas kinematics of up to a factor of $\sim1.5$ with rotating disks being viewed at different inclinations and/or centrally concentrated star-forming regions. A clear prediction is that their compact, quiescent descendants preserve some remnant rotation from their star-forming progenitors.
  • The galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) at high-z provides key information on star-formation history and mass assembly in the young Universe. We aimed to use the unique combination of deep optical/NIR/MIR imaging provided by HST, Spitzer and the VLT in the CANDELS-UDS, GOODS-South, and HUDF fields to determine the GSMF over the redshift range 3.5<z<7.5. We utilised the HST WFC3/IR NIR imaging from CANDELS and HUDF09, reaching H~27-28.5 over a total area of 369 arcmin2, in combination with associated deep HST ACS optical data, deep Spitzer IRAC imaging from the SEDS programme, and deep Y and K-band VLT Hawk-I images from the HUGS programme, to select a galaxy sample with high-quality photometric redshifts. These have been calibrated with more than 150 spectroscopic redshifts in the range 3.5<z<7.5, resulting in an overall precision of sigma_z/(1+z)~0.037. We have determined the low-mass end of the high-z GSMF with unprecedented precision, reaching down to masses as low as M*~10^9 Msun at z=4 and ~6x10^9 Msun at z=7. We find that the GSMF at 3.5<z<7.5 depends only slightly on the recipes adopted to measure the stellar masses, namely the photo-z, the SFHs, the nebular contribution or the presence of AGN on the parent sample. The low-mass end of the GSMF is steeper than has been found at lower redshifts, but appears to be unchanged over the redshift range probed here. Our results are very different from previous GSMF estimates based on converting UV galaxy luminosity functions into mass functions via tight M/L relations. Integrating our evolving GSMF over mass, we find that the growth of stellar mass density is barely consistent with the time-integral of the SFR density over cosmic time at z>4. These results confirm the unique synergy of the CANDELS+HUDF, HUGS, and SEDS surveys for the discovery and study of moderate/low-mass galaxies at high redshifts.
  • We study the relationship between the structure and star-formation rate (SFR) of X-ray selected low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the two Chandra Deep Fields, using Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and deep far-infrared maps from the PEP+GOODS-Herschel survey. We derive detailed distributions of structural parameters and FIR luminosities from carefully constructed control samples of galaxies, which we then compare to those of the AGNs. At z~1, AGNs show slightly diskier light profiles than massive inactive (non-AGN) galaxies, as well as modestly higher levels of gross galaxy disturbance (as measured by visual signatures of interactions and clumpy structure). In contrast, at z~2, AGNs show similar levels of galaxy disturbance as inactive galaxies, but display a red central light enhancement, which may arise due to a more pronounced bulge in AGN hosts or due to extinguished nuclear light. We undertake a number of tests of these alternatives, but our results do not strongly favour one interpretation over the other. The mean SFR and its distribution among AGNs and inactive galaxies are similar at z>1.5. At z<1, however, clear and significant enhancements are seen in the SFRs of AGNs with bulge-dominated light profiles. These trends suggest an evolution in the relation between nuclear activity and host properties with redshift, towards a minor role for mergers and interactions at z>1.5.
  • We present Keck-I MOSFIRE near-infrared spectroscopy for a sample of 13 compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at redshift $2\leq z \leq2.5$ with star formation rates of SFR$\sim$100M$_{\odot}$ y$^{-1}$ and masses of log(M/M$_{\odot}$)$\sim10.8$. Their high integrated gas velocity dispersions of $\sigma_{\rm{int}}$=230$^{+40}_{-30}$ km s$^{-1}$, as measured from emission lines of H$_{\alpha}$ and [OIII], and the resultant M$_{\star}-\sigma_{\rm{int}}$ relation and M$_{\star}$$-$M$_{\rm{dyn}}$ all match well to those of compact quiescent galaxies at $z\sim2$, as measured from stellar absorption lines. Since log(M$_{\star}$/M$_{\rm{dyn}}$)$=-0.06\pm0.2$ dex, these compact SFGs appear to be dynamically relaxed and more evolved, i.e., more depleted in gas and dark matter ($<$13$^{+17}_{-13}$\%) than their non-compact SFG counterparts at the same epoch. Without infusion of external gas, depletion timescales are short, less than $\sim$300 Myr. This discovery adds another link to our new dynamical chain of evidence that compact SFGs at $z\gtrsim2$ are already losing gas to become the immediate progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies by $z\sim2$.
  • The processes that trigger Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) remain poorly understood. While lower luminosity AGN may be triggered by minor disturbances to the host galaxy, stronger disturbances are likely required to trigger luminous AGN. Major wet mergers of galaxies are ideal environments for AGN triggering since they provide large gas supplies and galaxy scale torques. There is however little observational evidence for a strong connection between AGN and major mergers. We analyse the morphological properties of AGN host galaxies as a function of AGN and host galaxy luminosity and compare them to a carefully matched sample of control galaxies. AGN are X-ray selected in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 0.8 and have luminosities 41 < log(L_X [erg/s]) < 44.5. 'Fake AGN' are simulated in the control galaxies by adding point sources with the magnitude of the matched AGN. We find that AGN host and control galaxies have comparable assymetries, Sersic indices and ellipticities at restframe ~950nm. AGN host galaxies show neither higher average asymmetries nor higher fractions of very disturbed objects. There is no increase in the prevalence of merger signatures with AGN luminosity. At 95% confidence we find that major mergers are responsible for <6% of all AGN in our sample as well as <40% of the highest luminosity AGN log(L_X [erg/s]) ~ 43.5). Major mergers therefore either play only a very minor role in the triggering of AGN in the luminosity range studied or time delays are too long for merger features to remain visible.
  • We analyze the star-forming and structural properties of 45 massive (log(M/Msun)>10) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2<z<3 to explore whether they are progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z~2. The optical/NIR and far-IR Spitzer/Herschel colors indicate that most compact SFGs are heavily obscured. Nearly half (47%) host an X-ray bright AGN. In contrast, only about 10% of other massive galaxies at that time host AGNs. Compact SFGs have centrally-concentrated light profiles and spheroidal morphologies similar to quiescent galaxies, and are thus strikingly different from other SFGs. Most compact SFGs lie either within the SFR-M main sequence (65%) or below (30%), on the expected evolutionary path towards quiescent galaxies. These results show conclusively that galaxies become more compact before they lose their gas and dust, quenching star formation. Using extensive HST photometry from CANDELS and grism spectroscopy from the 3D-HST survey, we model their stellar populations with either exponentially declining (tau) star formation histories (SFHs) or physically-motivated SFHs drawn from semi-analytic models (SAMs). SAMs predict longer formation timescales and older ages ~2 Gyr, which are nearly twice as old as the estimates of the tau models. While both models yield good SED fits, SAM SFHs better match the observed slope and zero point of the SFR-M main sequence. Some low-mass compact SFGs (log(M/Msun)=10-10.6) have younger ages but lower sSFRs than that of more massive galaxies, suggesting that the low-mass galaxies reach the red sequence faster. If the progenitors of compact SFGs are extended SFGs, state-of-the-art SAMs show that mergers and disk instabilities are both able to shrink galaxies, but disk instabilities are more frequent (60% versus 40%) and form more concentrated galaxies. We confirm this result via high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations.
  • We study the evolution of the number density, as a function of the size, of passive early-type galaxies with a wide range of stellar masses 10^10<M*/Msun<10^11.5) from z~3 to z~1, exploiting the unique dataset available in the GOODS-South field, including the recently obtained WFC3 images as a part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). In particular, we select a sample of 107 massive (M*>10^10 M_sun), passive (SSFR<10^-2 Gyr^-1) and morphologically spheroidal galaxies at 1.2<z<3, taking advantage of the panchromatic dataset available for GOODS, including VLT, CFHT, Spitzer, Chandra and HST ACS+WFC3 data. We find that at 1<z<3 the passively evolving early-type galaxies are the reddest and most massive objects in the Universe, and we prove that a correlation between mass, morphology, color and star-formation activity is already in place at that epoch. We measure a significant evolution in the mass-size relation of passive early-type galaxies (ETGs) from z~3 to z~1, with galaxies growing on average by a factor of 2 in size in a 3 Gyr timescale only. We witness also an increase in the number density of passive ETGs of 50 times over the same time interval. We find that the first ETGs to form at z>2 are all compact or ultra-compact, while normal sized ETGs (meaning ETGs with sizes comparable to those of local counterparts of the same mass) are the most common ETGs only at z<1. The increase of the average size of ETGs at 0<z<1 is primarily driven by the appearance of new large ETGs rather than by the size increase of individual galaxies.
  • Recent work has suggested that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is not universal, but rather is correlated with galaxy stellar mass, stellar velocity dispersion, or morphological type. In this paper, we investigate variations of the IMF within individual galaxies. For this purpose, we use strong lensing and gas kinematics to measure independently the normalisation of the IMF of the bulge and disk components of a sample of 5 massive spiral galaxies with substantial bulge components taken from the SWELLS survey. We find that the stellar mass of the bulges are tightly constrained by the lensing and kinematic data. A comparison with masses based on stellar population synthesis models fitted to optical and near infrared photometry favors a Salpeter-like normalisation of the IMF. Conversely, the disk masses are less well constrained due to degeneracies with the dark matter halo, but are consistent with Milky Way type IMFs in agreement with previous studies. The disks are submaximal at 2.2 disk scale lengths, but due to the contribution of the bulges, the galaxies are baryon dominated at 2.2 disk scale lengths. Globally, our inferred IMF normalisation is consistent with that found for early-type galaxies of comparable stellar mass (> 10^11 M_sun). Our results suggest a non-universal IMF within the different components of spiral galaxies, adding to the well-known differences in stellar populations between disks and bulges.
  • Infrared 3.6 to 8 micron images of the Extended Groth Strip yield plausible counterpart identifications for all but one of 510 radio sources in the AEGIS20 S(1.4 GHz) > 50 micro-Jy sample. This is the first such deep sample that has been effectively 100% identified. Achieving the same identification rate at R-band would require observations reaching R_AB > 27. Spectroscopic redshifts are available for 46% of the sample and photometric redshifts for an additional 47%. Almost all of the sources with 3.6 micron AB magnitudes brighter than 19 have spectroscopic redshifts z < 1.1, while fainter objects predominantly have photometric redshifts with 1 \lapprox z \lapprox 3. Unlike more powerful radio sources that are hosted by galaxies having large stellar masses within a relatively narrow range, the AEGIS20 counterparts have stellar masses spanning more than a factor of 10 at z \sim 1. The sources are roughly 10--15% starbursts at z \lapprox 0.5 and 20--25% AGNs mostly at z > 1 with the remainder of uncertain nature.
  • We present results from a search for gravitationally lensed galaxies present in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Camera-3 (WFC3) images of the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). We present one bona fide lens system in UDS and two compact lens candidates in the GOODS-S field. The lensing system in UDS involves two background galaxies, one at z=1.847 lensed to an arc and a counterimage, and the second at a photometric redshift of z=2.32^{+0.10}_{-0.06} lensed to a double image. We reconstruct the lensed sources in the source plane and find in each of the two cases the sources can be separated to a pair of galaxies. The sources responsible for the arc are compact with effective radii of 0.3 to 0.4 kpc in WFC3 J_{125}-band and a total stellar mass and a star-formation rate of 2.1_{-0.4}^{+2.4} times 10^7 M_sun and 2.3_{-1.7}^{+ 0.6} M_sun yr^{-1}, respectively.The abnormally high H_{160}-band flux of this source is likely due to OIII emission lines with a rest-frame equivalent width about 700 Angstroms for OIII 5007 Angstroms. The sources responsible for the double image have corresponding values of about 0.4 to 0.5 kpc, 1.4_{-0.8}^{+1.9} times 10^9 M_sun, and 8.7_{-7.0}^{+11.1} M_sun yr^{-1}. Once completed CANDELS is expected to contain about 15 lensing systems and will allow statistical studies on both lensing mass profiles and z ~ 2 lensed galaxies.
  • We identify an abundant population of extreme emission line galaxies (EELGs) at redshift z~1.7 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging from Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). 69 EELG candidates are selected by the large contribution of exceptionally bright emission lines to their near-infrared broad-band magnitudes. Supported by spectroscopic confirmation of strong [OIII] emission lines -- with rest-frame equivalent widths ~1000\AA -- in the four candidates that have HST/WFC3 grism observations, we conclude that these objects are galaxies with 10^8 Msol in stellar mass, undergoing an enormous starburst phase with M_*/(dM_*/dt) of only ~15 Myr. These bursts may cause outflows that are strong enough to produce cored dark matter profiles in low-mass galaxies. The individual star formation rates and the co-moving number density (3.7x10^-4 Mpc^-3) can produce in ~4 Gyr much of the stellar mass density that is presently contained in 10^8-10^9 Msol dwarf galaxies. Therefore, our observations provide a strong indication that many or even most of the stars in present-day dwarf galaxies formed in strong, short-lived bursts, mostly at z>1.
  • In this work we analyze the physical properties of a sample of 153 star forming galaxies at z~0.84, selected by their H-alpha flux with a NB filter. B-band luminosities of the objects are higher than those of local star forming galaxies. Most of the galaxies are located in the blue cloud, though some objects are detected in the green valley and in the red sequence. After the extinction correction is applied virtually all these red galaxies move to the blue sequence, unveiling their dusty nature. A check on the extinction law reveals that the typical extinction law for local starbursts is well suited for our sample but with E(B-V)_stars=0.55 E(B-V)_gas. We compare star formation rates (SFR) measured with different tracers (H-alpha, UV and IR) finding that they agree within a factor of three after extinction correction. We find a correlation between the ratios SFR_FUV/SFR_H-alpha, SFR_IR/SFR_H-alpha and the EW(H-alpha) (i.e. weighted age) which accounts for part of the scatter. We obtain stellar mass estimations fitting templates to multi-wavelength photometry. The typical stellar mass of a galaxy within our sample is ~10^10 Msun. The SFR is correlated with stellar mass and the specific star formation rate (sSFR) decreases with it, indicating that massive galaxies are less affected by star formation processes than less massive ones. This result is consistent with the downsizing scenario. To quantify this downsizing we estimated the quenching mass M_Q for our sample at z~0.84, finding that it declines from M_Q ~10^12 Msun to M_Q ~8x10^10 Msun at the local Universe.
  • We assess the effects of simulated active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on the colour and morphology measurements of their host galaxies. To test the morphology measurements, we select a sample of galaxies not known to host AGNs and add a series of point sources scaled to represent specified fractions of the observed V band light detected from the resulting systems; we then compare morphology measurements of the simulated systems to measurements of the original galaxies. AGN contributions >20 per cent bias most of the morphology measurements tested, though the extent of the apparent bias depends on the morphological characteristics of the original galaxies. We test colour measurements by adding to non-AGN galaxy spectra a quasar spectrum scaled to contribute specified fractions of the rest-frame B band light detected from the resulting systems. A quasar fraction of 5 per cent can move the NUV-r colour of an elliptical galaxy from the UV-optical red sequence to the green valley, and 20 per cent can move it into the blue cloud. Combining the colour and morphology results, we find that a galaxy/AGN system with an AGN contribution >20 per cent may appear bluer and more bulge-dominated than the underlying galaxy. We conclude that (1) bulge-dominated, E/S0/Sa, and early-type morphology classifications are accurate for red AGN host galaxies and may be accurate for blue host galaxies, unless the AGN manifests itself as a well-defined point source; and (2) although highly unobscured AGNs, such as the quasar used for our experiments, can significantly bias the measured colours of AGN host galaxies, it is possible to identify such systems by examining optical images of the hosts for the presence of a point source and/or measuring the level of nuclear obscuration.
  • We present the AEGIS-X survey, a series of deep Chandra ACIS-I observations of the Extended Groth Strip. The survey comprises pointings at 8 separate positions, each with nominal exposure 200ks, covering a total area of approximately 0.67 deg2 in a strip of length 2 degrees. We describe in detail an updated version of our data reduction and point source detection algorithms used to analyze these data. A total of 1325 band-merged sources have been found to a Poisson probability limit of 4e-6, with limiting fluxes of 5.3e-17 erg/cm2/s in the soft (0.5-2 keV) band and 3.8e-16 erg/cm2/s in the hard (2-10 keV) band. We present simulations verifying the validity of our source detection procedure and showing a very small, <1.5%, contamination rate from spurious sources. Optical/NIR counterparts have been identified from the DEEP2, CFHTLS, and Spitzer/IRAC surveys of the same region. Using a likelihood ratio method, we find optical counterparts for 76% of our sources, complete to R(AB)=24.1, and, of the 66% of the sources that have IRAC coverage, 94% have a counterpart to a limit of 0.9 microJy at 3.6 microns (m(AB)=23.8). After accounting for (small) positional offsets in the 8 Chandra fields, the astrometric accuracy of the Chandra positions is found to be 0.8 arcsec RMS, however this number depends both on the off-axis angle and the number of detected counts for a given source. All the data products described in this paper are made available via a public website.
  • We explore the role of AGN in establishing and/or maintaining the bimodal colour distribution of galaxies by quenching their star-formation and hence, causing their transition from the blue to the red cloud. Important tests for this scenario include (i) the X-ray properties of galaxies in the transition zone between the two clouds and (ii) the incidence of AGN in post-starbursts, i.e. systems observed shortly after (<1Gyr) the termination of their star-formation. We perform these tests by combining deep Chandra observations with multiwavelength data from the AEGIS survey. Stacking the X-ray photons at the positions of galaxies (0.4<z<0.9) not individually detected at X-ray wavelengths suggests a population of obscured AGN among sources in the transition zone and in the red cloud. Their mean X-ray and mid-IR properties are consistent with moderately obscured low-luminosity AGN, Compton thick sources or a mix of both. Morphologies show that major mergers are unlikely to drive the evolution of this population but minor interactions may play a role. The incidence of obscured AGN in the red cloud (both direct detections and stacking results) suggests that BH accretion outlives the termination of the star-formation. This is also supported by our finding that post-starburst galaxies at z~0.8 and AGN are associated, in agreement with recent results at low-z. A large fraction of post-starbursts and red cloud galaxies show evidence for at least moderate levels of AGN obscuration. This implies that if AGN outflows cause the colour transformation of galaxies, then some nuclear gas and dust clouds either remain unaffected or relax to the central galaxy regions after the quenching their star-formation.
  • We imaged a set of 15 intermediate redshift (z~0.8) luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with the Keck Laser Guide Star (LGS) AO facility. These galaxies were selected from the GOODS-S field, allowing us to combine the high spatial resolution HST optical (B, V, i, and z-bands) images with our near-infrared (K'-band) images to study the LIRG morphologies and spatially resolved spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Two thirds of the LIRGs are disk galaxies, with only one third showing some evidence for interactions, minor, or major mergers. In contrast with local LIRG disks (which are primarily barred systems), only 10% of the LIRG disks in our sample contain a prominent bar. While the optical bands tend to show significant point-like substructure, indicating distributed star formation, the AO K-band images tend to be smooth. The SEDs of the LIRGs are consistent with distributed dusty star formation, as exhibited by optical to IR colors redder than allowed by old stellar populations alone. This effect is most pronounced in the galaxy cores, possibly indicating central star formation. We also observed a set of 11 intermediate redshift comparison galaxies, selected to be non-ellipticals with apparent K-band magnitudes comparable to the LIRGs. The "normal" (non-LIRG) systems tended to have lower optical luminosity, lower stellar mass, and more irregular morphology than the LIRGs. Half of the "normal" galaxies have SEDs consistent with intermediate aged stellar populations and minimal dust. The other half show evidence for some dusty star formation, usually concentrated in their cores. Our work suggests that the LIRG disk galaxies are similar to large disk systems today, undergoing self regulated star formation, only at 10 - 20 times higher rates. (Abridged)
  • Accurate photometric redshifts are among the key requirements for precision weak lensing measurements. Both the large size of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the existence of large spectroscopic redshift samples that are flux-limited beyond its depth have made it the optimal data source for developing methods to properly calibrate photometric redshifts for lensing. Here, we focus on galaxy-galaxy lensing in a survey with spectroscopic lens redshifts, as in the SDSS. We develop statistics that quantify the effect of source redshift errors on the lensing calibration and on the weighting scheme, and show how they can be used in the presence of redshift failure and sampling variance. We then demonstrate their use with 2838 source galaxies with spectroscopy from DEEP2 and zCOSMOS, evaluating several public photometric redshift algorithms, in two cases including a full p(z) for each object, and find lensing calibration biases as low as 1% (due to fortuitous cancellation of two types of bias) or as high as 20% for methods in active use (despite the small mean photoz bias of these algorithms). Our work demonstrates that lensing-specific statistics must be used to reliably calibrate the lensing signal, due to asymmetric effects of (frequently non-Gaussian) photoz errors. We also demonstrate that large-scale structure (LSS) can strongly impact the photoz calibration and its error estimation, due to a correlation between the LSS and the photoz errors, and argue that at least two independent degree-scale spectroscopic samples are needed to suppress its effects. Given the size of our spectroscopic sample, we can reduce the galaxy-galaxy lensing calibration error well below current SDSS statistical errors.
  • We present the quantitative rest-frame B morphological evolution and galaxy merger fractions at 0.2 < z < 1.2 as observed by the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). We use the Gini coefficent and M_20 to identify major mergers and classify galaxy morphology for a volume-limited sample of 3009 galaxies brighter than 0.4 L_B^*, assuming pure luminosity evolution of 1.3 M_B per unit redshift. We find that the merger fraction remains roughly constant at 10 +/- 2% for 0.2 < z < 1.2. The fraction of E/S0/Sa increases from 21+/- 3% at z ~ 1.1 to 44 +/- 9% at z ~ 0.3, while the fraction of Sb-Ir decreases from 64 +/- 6% at z ~ 1.1 to 47 +/- 9% at z ~ 0.3. The majority of z < 1.2 Spitzer MIPS 24 micron sources with L(IR) > 10^11 L_sun are disk galaxies, and only ~ 15% are classified as major merger candidates. Edge-on and dusty disk galaxies (Sb-Ir) are almost a third of the red sequence at z ~ 1.1, while E/S0/Sa makeup over 90% of the red sequence at z ~ 0.3. Approximately 2% of our full sample are red mergers. We conclude (1) the galaxy merger rate does not evolve strongly between 0.2 < z < 1.2; (2) the decrease in the volume-averaged star-formation rate density since z ~ 1 is a result of declining star-formation in disk galaxies rather than a disappearing population of major mergers; (3) the build-up of the red sequence at z < 1 can be explained by a doubling in the number of spheroidal galaxies since z ~ 1.2.
  • We present two methods for determining spectroscopic redshifts of galaxies in the DEEP2 survey which display only one identifiable feature, an emission line, in the observed spectrum ("single-line galaxies"). First, we assume each single line is one of the four brightest lines accessible to DEEP2: Halpha, [OIII] 5007, Hbeta, or [OII] 3727. Then, we supplement spectral information with BRI photometry. The first method, parameter space proximity (PSP), calculates the distance of a single-line galaxy to galaxies of known redshift in (B-R), (R-I), R, observed wavelength parameter space. The second method is an artificial neural network (ANN). Prior information, such as allowable line widths and ratios, rules out one or more of the four lines for some galaxies in both methods. Based on analyses of evaluation sets, both methods are nearly perfect at identifying blended [OII] doublets. Of the lines identified as Halpha in the PSP and ANN methods, 91.4% and 94.2% respectively are accurate. Although the methods are not this accurate at discriminating between [OIII] and Hbeta, they can identify a single line as one of the two, and the ANN method in particular unambiguously identifies many [OIII] lines. From a sample of 640 single-line spectra, the methods determine the identities of 401 (62.7%) and 472 (73.8%) single lines, respectively, at accuracies similar to those found in the evaluation sets.
  • We examine the radius-luminosity (R-L) relation for blue galaxies in the Team Keck Redshift Survey (TKRS) of GOODS-N. We compare with a volume-limited, Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample and find that the R-L relation has evolved to lower surface brightness since z=1. Based on the detection limits of GOODS this can not be explained by incompleteness in low surface-brightness galaxies. Number density arguments rule out a pure radius evolution. It can be explained by a radius dependent decline in B-band luminosity with time. Assuming a linear shift in M_B with z, we use a maximum likelihood method to quantify the evolution. Under these assumptions, large (R_{1/2} > 5 kpc), and intermediate sized (3 < R_{1/2} < 5 kpc) galaxies, have experienced Delta M_B =1.53 (-0.10,+0.13) and 1.65 (-0.18, +0.08) magnitudes of dimming since z=1. A simple exponential decline in star formation with an e-folding time of 3 Gyr can result in this amount of dimming. Meanwhile, small galaxies, or some subset thereof, have experienced more evolution, 2.55 (+/- 0.38) magnitudes. This factor of ten decline in luminosity can be explained by sub-samples of starbursting dwarf systems that fade rapidly, coupled with a decline in burst strength or frequency. Samples of bursting, luminous, blue, compact galaxies at intermediate redshifts have been identified by various previous studies. If there has been some growth in galaxy size with time, these measurements are upper limits on luminosity fading.
  • We visually and quantitatively determine the host galaxy morphologies of 94 intermediate redshift (0.2 < z < 1.2) active galactic nuclei (AGN), selected using Chandra X-ray and Spitzer mid-infrared data in the Extended Groth Strip. Using recently developed morphology measures, the second-order moment of the brightest 20% of a galaxy's flux (M_{20}) and the Gini coefficient, we find that X-ray-selected AGN mostly reside in E/S0/Sa galaxies (53^{+11}_{-10}%), while IR-selected AGN show no clear preference for host morphology. X-ray-selected AGN hosts are members of close pairs more often than the field population by a factor of 3.3+/-1.4, but most of these pair members appear to be undisturbed early-type galaxies and do not tend to show direct evidence of gravitational perturbations or interactions. Thus, the activation mechanism for AGN activity remains unknown, even for pair members.
  • A new 6-cm survey of almost 0.6 square degrees to a limit of 0.55-mJy/beam (10-sigma) finds 37 isolated radio sources and 7 radio source pairs (not necessarily physical companions). IRAC counterparts are identified for at least 92% of the radio sources within the area of deep IRAC coverage, which includes 31 isolated sources and 6 pairs. This contrasts with an identification rate of <74% to R<23.95 in visible light. Eight of the IRAC galaxies have power law spectral energy distributions, implying that the mid-infrared emission comes from a powerful AGN. The remaining 26 IRAC galaxies show stellar emission in the mid-infrared, probably in most of these galaxies because the stellar emission is bright enough to outshine an underlying AGN. The infrared colors suggest that the majority of these galaxies are bulge-dominated and have redshifts between approximately 0.5 and 1.0. Visible spectra from the DEEP2 redshift survey, available for 11 galaxies, are consistent with this suggestion. The IRAC galaxies fall into two distinct groups in a color-magnitude diagram, one group (the "stripe") includes all the AGN. The other group (the "blue clump") has blue 3.6 to 8 micron colors and a small range of 8 micron magnitudes. This separation should be useful in classifying galaxies found in other radio surveys.