• It has recently been established that the properties of young star clusters (YSCs) can vary as a function of the galactic environment in which they are found. We use the cluster catalogue produced by the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) collaboration to investigate cluster properties in the spiral galaxy M51. We analyse the cluster population as a function of galactocentric distance and in arm and inter-arm regions. The cluster mass function exhibits a similar shape at all radial bins, described by a power law with a slope close to $-2$ and an exponential truncation around $10^5\ \rm{M}_{\odot}$ . While the mass functions of the YSCs in the spiral arm and inter-arm regions have similar truncation masses, the inter-arm region mass function has a significantly steeper slope than the one in the arm region; a trend that is also observed in the giant molecular cloud mass function and predicted by simulations. The age distribution of clusters is dependent on the region considered, and is consistent with rapid disruption only in dense regions, while little disruption is observed at large galactocentric distances and in the inter-arm region. The fraction of stars forming in clusters does not show radial variations, despite the drop in the $H_2$ surface density measured as function of galactocentric distance. We suggest that the higher disruption rate observed in the inner part of the galaxy is likely at the origin of the observed flat cluster formation efficiency radial profile.
  • We present a kpc-scale analysis of the relationship between the molecular depletion time ($\tau_\mathrm{dep}^\mathrm{mol}$) and the orbital time ($\tau_\mathrm{orb}$) across the field of 39 face-on local galaxies, selected from the EDGE-CALIFA sample. We find that, on average, 5% of the available molecular gas is converted into stars per orbital time, or $\tau_\mathrm{dep}^\mathrm{mol}\sim20\tau_\mathrm{orb}$. The resolved relation shows a scatter of $\sim0.5$ dex. The scatter is ascribable to galaxies of different morphologies that follow different $\tau_\mathrm{dep}^\mathrm{mol}-\tau_\mathrm{orb}$ relations which decrease in steepness from early- to late-types. The morphologies appear to be linked with the star formation rate surface density, the molecular depletion time, and the orbital time, but they do not correlate with the molecular gas content of the galaxies in our sample. We speculate that in our molecular gas rich, early-type galaxies, the morphological quenching (in particular the disc stabilization via shear), rather than the absence of molecular gas, is the main factor responsible for their current inefficient star formation.
  • The process that leads to the formation of the bright star forming sites observed along prominent spiral arms remains elusive. We present results of a multi-wavelength study of a spiral arm segment in the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M51 that belongs to a spiral density wave and exhibits nine gas spurs. The combined observations of the(ionized, atomic, molecular, dusty) interstellar medium (ISM) with star formation tracers (HII regions, young <10Myr stellar clusters) suggest (1) no variation in giant molecular cloud (GMC) properties between arm and gas spurs, (2) gas spurs and extinction feathers arising from the same structure with a close spatial relation between gas spurs and ongoing/recent star formation (despite higher gas surface densities in the spiral arm), (3) no trend in star formation age either along the arm or along a spur, (4) evidence for strong star formation feedback in gas spurs: (5) tentative evidence for star formation triggered by stellar feedback for one spur, and (6) GMC associations (GMAs) being no special entities but the result of blending of gas arm/spur cross-sections in lower resolution observations. We conclude that there is no evidence for a coherent star formation onset mechanism that can be solely associated to the presence of the spiral density wave. This suggests that other (more localized) mechanisms are important to delay star formation such that it occurs in spurs. The evidence of star formation proceeding over several million years within individual spurs implies that the mechanism that leads to star formation acts or is sustained over a longer time-scale.
  • High critical density molecular lines like HCN(1-0) or HCO+(1-0) represent our best tool to study currently star-forming, dense molecular gas at extragalactic distances. The optical depth of these lines is a key ingredient to estimate the effective density required to excite emission. However, constraints on this quantity are even scarcer in the literature than measurements of the high density tracers themselves. Here, we combine new observations of HCN, HCO+ and HNC(1-0) and their optically thin isotopologues H13CN, H13CO+ and HN13C(1-0) to measure isotopologue line ratios. We use IRAM 30-m observations from the large program EMPIRE and new ALMA observations, which together target 6 nearby star-forming galaxies. Using spectral stacking techniques, we calculate or place strong upper limits on the HCN/H13CN, HCO+/H13CO+ and HNC/HN13C line ratios in the inner parts of these galaxies. Under simple assumptions, we use these to estimate the optical depths of HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0) to be \tau ~2-11 in the active, inner regions of our targets. The critical densities are consequently lowered to values between 5-20$\times 10^5$, 1-3$\times 10^5$ and 9$\times 10^4$ cm-3 for HCN, HCO+ and HNC, respectively. We study the impact of having different beam-filling factors, $\eta$, on these estimates and find that the effective critical densities decrease by a factor of $\frac{\eta_{12}}{\eta_{13}}\,\tau_{12}$. A comparison to existing work in NGC 5194 and NGC 253 shows HCN/H13CN and HCO+/H13CO+ ratios in agreement with our measurements within the uncertainties. The same is true for studies in other environments such as the Galactic Centre or nuclear regions of AGN-dominated nearby galaxies.
  • AGN feedback is invoked as one of the most relevant mechanisms that shape the evolution of galaxies. Our goal is to understand the interplay between AGN feedback and the interstellar medium in M51, a nearby spiral galaxy with a modest AGN and a kpc-scale radio jet expanding through the disc of the galaxy. For that purpose, we combine molecular gas observations in the CO(1-0) and HCN(1-0) lines from the Plateau de Bure interferometer with archival radio, X-ray, and optical data. We show that there is a significant scarcity of CO emission in the ionisation cone, while molecular gas emission tends to accumulate towards the edges of the cone. The distribution and kinematics of CO and HCN line emission reveal AGN feedback effects out to r~500pc, covering the whole extent of the radio jet, with complex kinematics in the molecular gas which displays strong local variations. We propose that this is the result of the almost coplanar jet pushing on molecular gas in different directions as it expands; the effects are more pronounced in HCN than in CO emission, probably as the result of radiative shocks. Following previous interpretation of the redshifted molecular line in the central 5" as caused by a molecular outflow, we estimate the outflow rates to be Mdot_H2~0.9Msun/yr and Mdot_dense~0.6Msun/yr, which are comparable to the molecular inflow rates (~1Msun/yr); gas inflow and AGN feedback could be mutually regulated processes. The agreement with findings in other nearby radio galaxies suggests that this is not an isolated case, and probably the paradigm of AGN feedback through radio jets, at least for galaxies hosting low-luminosity active nuclei.
  • We present the first results from the EMPIRE survey, an IRAM large program that is mapping tracers of high density molecular gas across the disks of nine nearby star-forming galaxies. Here, we present new maps of the 3-mm transitions of HCN, HCO+, and HNC across the whole disk of our pilot target, M51. As expected, dense gas correlates with tracers of recent star formation, filling the "luminosity gap" between Galactic cores and whole galaxies. In detail, we show that both the fraction of gas that is dense, f_dense traced by HCN/CO, and the rate at which dense gas forms stars, SFE_dense traced by IR/HCN, depend on environment in the galaxy. The sense of the dependence is that high surface density, high molecular gas fraction regions of the galaxy show high dense gas fractions and low dense gas star formation efficiencies. This agrees with recent results for individual pointings by Usero et al. 2015 but using unbiased whole-galaxy maps. It also agrees qualitatively with the behavior observed contrasting our own Solar Neighborhood with the central regions of the Milky Way. The sense of the trends can be explained if the dense gas fraction tracks interstellar pressure but star formation occurs only in regions of high density contrast.
  • The transport of gas towards the centre of galaxies is critical for black hole feeding and, indirectly, it can control active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We have quantified the molecular gas inflow in the central R<1kpc of M51 to be 1 Msun/yr, using a new gravitational torque map and the molecular gas traced by the PdBI Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey (PAWS). The nuclear stellar bar is responsible for this gas inflow. We have also used torque profiles to estimate the location of dynamical resonances, suggesting a corotation for the bar at R~20", and a corotation for the spiral at R~100". We demonstrate how important it is to correct 3.6um images for dust emission in order to compute gravitational torques, and we carefully examine further sources of uncertainty. Our observational measurement of gas inflow can be compared with nuclear molecular outflow rates and provide useful constraints for numerical simulations.
  • We present a molecular line scan in the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) that covers the entire 3mm window (79-115 GHz) using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our CO redshift coverage spans z<0.45, 1<z<1.9 and all z>2. We reach a CO detection limit that is deep enough to detect essentially all z>1 CO lines reported in the literature so far. We have developed and applied different line searching algorithms, resulting in the discovery of 17 line candidates. We estimate that the rate of false positive line detections is ~2/17. We identify optical/NIR counterparts from the deep ancillary database of the HDF-N for seven of these candidates and investigate their available SEDs. Two secure CO detections in our scan are identified with star-forming galaxies at z=1.784 and at z=2.047. These galaxies have colors consistent with the `BzK' color selection and they show relatively bright CO emission compared with galaxies of similar dust continuum luminosity. We also detect two spectral lines in the submillimeter galaxy HDF850.1 at z=5.183. We consider an additional 9 line candidates as high quality. Our observations also provide a deep 3mm continuum map (1-sigma noise level = 8.6 $\mu$Jy/beam). Via a stacking approach, we find that optical/MIR bright galaxies contribute only to <50% of the SFR density at 1<z<3, unless high dust temperatures are invoked. The present study represents a first, fundamental step towards an unbiased census of molecular gas in `normal' galaxies at high-z, a crucial goal of extragalactic astronomy in the ALMA era.