• NaOsO$_{\text{3}}$ undergoes a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at 410 K, concomitant with the onset of antiferromagnetic order. The excitation spectra have been investigated through the MIT by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Os L$_{\text{3}}$ edge. Low resolution ($\Delta E \sim$ 300 meV) measurements over a wide range of energies reveal that local electronic excitations do not change appreciably through the MIT. This is consistent with a picture in which structural distortions do not drive the MIT. In contrast, high resolution ($\Delta E \sim $ 56 meV) measurements show that the well-defined, low energy magnons in the insulating state weaken and dampen upon approaching the metallic state. Concomitantly, a broad continuum of excitations develops which is well described by the magnetic fluctuations of a nearly antiferromagnetic Fermi liquid. By revealing the continuous evolution of the magnetic quasiparticle spectrum as it changes its character from itinerant to localized, our results provide unprecedented insight into the nature of the MIT in \naoso. In particular, the presence of weak correlations in the paramagnetic phase implies a degree of departure from the ideal Slater limit.
  • High-pressure x-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed at the Ir $L_3$ and $L_2$ absorption edges of Sr$_3$Ir$_2$O$_7$. The branching ratio of white line intensities continuously decreases with pressure, reflecting a reduction in the angular part of the expectation value of the spin-orbit coupling operator, $\left\langle {\bf L} \cdot {\bf S} \right\rangle$. Up to the high-pressure structural transition at 53 GPa, this behavior can be explained within a single-ion model, where pressure increases the strength of the cubic crystal field, which suppresses the spin-orbit induced hybridization of $J_{\text{eff}} = 3/2$ and $e_g$ levels. We observe a further reduction of the branching ratio above the structural transition, which cannot be explained within a single-ion model of spin-orbit coupling and cubic crystal fields. This change in $\left\langle {\bf L} \cdot {\bf S} \right\rangle$ in the high-pressure, metallic phase of Sr$_3$Ir$_2$O$_7$ could arise from non-cubic crystal fields or a bandwidth-driven hybridization of $J_{\text{eff}}=1/2,\,3/2$ states, and suggests that the electronic ground state significantly deviates from the $J_{\text{eff}}=1/2$ limit.
  • NaOsO3 hosts a rare manifestation of a metal-insulator transition driven by magnetic correlations, placing the magnetic exchange interactions in a central role. We use resonant inelastic x-ray scattering to directly probe these magnetic exchange interactions. A dispersive and strongly gapped (58 meV) excitation is observed indicating appreciable spin-orbit coupling in this 5d3 system. The excitation is well described within a minimal model Hamiltonian with strong anisotropy and Heisenberg exchange (J1=J2=13.9 meV). The observed behavior places NaOsO3 on the boundary between localized and itinerant magnetism.
  • The challenge of one-dimensional systems is to understand their physics beyond the level of known elementary excitations. By high-resolution neutron spectroscopy in a quantum spin ladder material, we probe the leading multiparticle excitation by characterizing the two-magnon bound state at zero field. By applying high magnetic fields, we create and select the singlet (longitudinal) and triplet (transverse) excitations of the fully spin-polarized ladder, which have not been observed previously and are close analogs of the modes anticipated in a polarized Haldane chain. Theoretical modelling of the dynamical response demonstrates our complete quantitative understanding of these states.
  • We study the structural evolution of Sr$_3$Ir$_2$O$_7$ as a function of pressure using x-ray diffraction. At a pressure of 54 GPa at room temperature, we observe a first-order structural phase transition, associated with a change from tetragonal to monoclinic symmetry, and accompanied by a 4% volume collapse. Rietveld refinement of the high-pressure phase reveals a novel modification of the Ruddlesden-Popper structure, which adopts an altered stacking sequence of the perovskite bilayers. As the positions of the oxygen atoms could not be reliably refined from the data, we use density functional theory (local-density approximation+$U$+spin orbit) to optimize the crystal structure, and to elucidate the electronic and magnetic properties of Sr$_3$Ir$_2$O$_7$ at high pressure. In the low-pressure tetragonal phase, we find that the in-plane rotation of the IrO$_6$ octahedra increases with pressure. The calculations further indicate that a bandwidth-driven insulator-metal transition occurs at $\sim$20 GPa, along with a quenching of the magnetic moment. In the high-pressure monoclinic phase, structural optimization resulted in complex tilting and rotation of the oxygen octahedra, and strongly overlapping $t_{2g}$ and $e_g$ bands. The $t_{2g}$ bandwidth renders both the spin-orbit coupling and electronic correlations ineffectual in opening an electronic gap, resulting in a robust metallic state for the high-pressure phase of Sr$_3$Ir$_2$O$_7$.
  • Using resonant magnetic x-ray scattering we address the unresolved nature of the magnetic groundstate and the low-energy effective Hamiltonian of Sm$_2$Ir$_2$O$_7$, a prototypical pyrochlore iridate with a finite temperature metal-insulator transition. Through a combination of elastic and inelastic measurements, we show that the magnetic ground state is an all-in all-out (AIAO) antiferromagnet. The magnon dispersion indicates significant electronic correlations and can be well-described by a minimal Hamiltonian that includes Heisenberg exchange ($J=27.3(6)$ meV) and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction ($D=4.9(3)$ meV), which provides a consistent description of the magnetic order and excitations. In establishing that Sm$_2$Ir$_2$O$_7$ has the requisite inversion symmetry preserving AIAO magnetic groundstate, our results support the notion that pyrochlore iridates may host correlated Weyl semimetals.
  • Measuring how the magnetic correlations throughout the Brillouin zone evolve in a Mott insulator as charges are introduced dramatically improved our understanding of the pseudogap, non-Fermi liquids and high $T_C$ superconductivity. Recently, photoexcitation has been used to induce similarly exotic states transiently. However, understanding how these states emerge has been limited because of a lack of available probes of magnetic correlations in the time domain, which hinders further investigation of how light can be used to control the properties of solids. Here we implement magnetic resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at a free electron laser, and directly determine the magnetization dynamics after photo-doping the Mott insulator Sr$_2$IrO$_4$. We find that the non-equilibrium state 2~ps after the excitation has strongly suppressed long-range magnetic order, but hosts photo-carriers that induce strong, non-thermal magnetic correlations. The magnetism recovers its two-dimensional (2D) in-plane N\'eel correlations on a timescale of a few ps, while the three-dimensional (3D) long-range magnetic order restores over a far longer, fluence-dependent timescale of a few hundred ps. The dramatic difference in these two timescales, implies that characterizing the dimensionality of magnetic correlations will be vital in our efforts to understand ultrafast magnetic dynamics.
  • The rich physics manifested by 5d oxides falls outside the Mott-Hubbard paradigm used to successfully explain the electronic and magnetic properties of 3d oxides. Much consideration has been given to the extent to which strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC), in the limit of increased bandwidth and reduced electron correlation, drives the formation of novel electronic states, as manifested through the existence of metal-insulator transitions (MITs). SOC is believed to play a dominant role in 5d5 systems such as iridates (Ir4+), undergoing MITs which may or may not be intimately connected to magnetic order, with pyrochlore and perovksite systems being examples of the former and latter, respectively. However, the role of SOC for other 5d configurations is less clear. For example, 5d3 (e.g Os5+) systems are expected to have an orbital singlet and consequently a reduced effect of SOC in the groundstate. The pyrochlore osmate Cd2Os2O7 nonetheless exhibits a MIT intimately entwined with magnetic order with phenomena similar to pyrochlore iridates. Here we report the first resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements on an osmium compound, allowing us to determine the salient electronic and magnetic energy scales controlling the MIT in Cd2Os2O7, which we benchmark against detailed quantum chemistry calculations. In particular, we reveal the emergence at the MIT of a magnetic excitation corresponding to a superposition of multiple spin-flip processes from an Ising-like all-in/all-out magnetic groundstate. We discuss our results with respect to the role of SOC in magnetically mediated MITs in 5d systems
  • The magnetic critical scattering in Sr$_2$IrO$_4$ has been characterized using X-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) both below and above the 3D antiferromagnetic ordering temperature, T$_{\text{N}}$. The order parameter critical exponent below T$_{\text{N}}$ is found to be \beta=0.195(4), in the range of the 2D XYh$_4$ universality class. Over an extended temperature range above T$_{\text{N}}$, the amplitude and correlation length of the intrinsic critical fluctuations are well described by the 2D Heisenberg model with XY anisotropy. This contrasts with an earlier study of the critical scattering over a more limited range of temperature which found agreement with the theory of the isotropic 2D Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet, developed to describe the critical fluctuations of the conventional Mott insulator La$_2$CuO$_4$ and related systems. Our study therefore establishes the importance of XY anisotropy in the low-energy effective Hamiltonian of Sr$_2$IrO$_4$, the prototypical spin-orbit Mott insulator.
  • The square-lattice quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet displays a pronounced anomaly of unknown origin in its magnetic excitation spectrum. The anomaly manifests itself only for short wavelength excitations propagating along the direction connecting nearest neighbors. Using polarized neutron spectroscopy, we have fully characterized the magnetic fluctuations in the model metal-organic compound CFTD, revealing an isotropic continuum at the anomaly indicative of fractional excitations. A theoretical framework based on the Gutzwiller projection method is developed to explain the origin of the continuum at the anomaly. This indicates that the anomaly arises from deconfined fractional spin-1/2 quasiparticle pairs, the 2D analog of 1D spinons. Away from the anomaly the conventional spin-wave spectrum is recovered as pairs of fractional quasiparticles bind to form spin-1 magnons. Our results therefore establish the existence of fractional quasiparticles in the simplest model two dimensional antiferromagnet even in the absence of frustration.
  • We report neutron inelastic scattering measurements and analysis of the spectrum of magnons propagating within the Fe2O4 bilayers of LuFe2O4. The observed spectrum is consistent with six magnetic modes and a single prominent gap, which is compatible with a single bilayer magnetic unit cell containing six spins. We model the magnon dispersion by linear spin-wave theory and find very good agreement with the domain-averaged spectrum of a spin-charge bilayer superstructure comprising one Fe3+ -rich monolayer and one Fe2+ -rich monolayer. These findings indicate the existence of polar bilayers in LuFe2O4, contrary to recent studies that advocate a charge-segregated non-polar bilayer model. Weak scattering observed below the magnon gap suggests that a fraction of the bilayers contain other combinations of charged monolayers not included in the model. Refined values for the dominant exchange interactions are reported.
  • Non-resonant Raman spectroscopy in the hard X-ray regime has been used to explore the electronic structure of the first two members of the Ruddlesden-Popper series Sr$_{n+1}$Ir$_n$O$_{3n+1}$ of iridates. By tuning the photon energy transfer around 530 eV we have been able to explore the oxygen K near edge structure with bulk sensitivity. The angular dependence of the spectra has been exploited to assign features in the 528-535 eV energy range to specific transitions involving the Ir 5d orbitals. This has allowed us to extract reliable values for both the t2g-eg splitting arising from the cubic component of the crystal field (10Dq), in addition to the splitting of the eg orbitals due to tetragonal distortions. The values we obtain are (3.8, 1.6) eV and (3.55, 1.9) eV for Sr$_2$IrO$_4$ and Sr$_3$Ir$_2$O$_7$, respectively.
  • A quantum critical point (QCP) is a singularity in the phase diagram arising due to quantum mechanical fluctuations. The exotic properties of some of the most enigmatic physical systems, including unconventional metals and superconductors, quantum magnets, and ultracold atomic condensates, have been related to the importance of the critical quantum and thermal fluctuations near such a point. However, direct and continuous control of these fluctuations has been difficult to realize, and complete thermodynamic and spectroscopic information is required to disentangle the effects of quantum and classical physics around a QCP. Here we achieve this control in a high-pressure, high-resolution neutron scattering experiment on the quantum dimer material TlCuCl3. By measuring the magnetic excitation spectrum across the entire quantum critical phase diagram, we illustrate the similarities between quantum and thermal melting of magnetic order. We prove the critical nature of the unconventional longitudinal ("Higgs") mode of the ordered phase by damping it thermally. We demonstrate the development of two types of criticality, quantum and classical, and use their static and dynamic scaling properties to conclude that quantum and thermal fluctuations can behave largely independently near a QCP.
  • Neutron inelastic scattering has been used to probe the spin dynamics of the quantum (S=1/2) ferromagnet on the pyrochlore lattice Lu2V2O7. Well-defined spin waves are observed at all energies and wavevectors, allowing us to determine the parameters of the Hamiltonian of the system. The data are found to be in excellent overall agreement with a minimal model that includes a nearest- neighbour Heisenberg exchange J = 8:22(2) meV and a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) D =1:5(1) meV. The large DMI term revealed by our study is broadly consistent with the model developed by Onose et al. to explain the magnon Hall effect they observed in Lu2V2O7 [1], although our ratio of D=J = 0:18(1) is roughly half of their value and three times larger than calculated by ab initio methods [2].
  • We present a study of the magnetic and crystallographic structure of TbMnO$_3$ in the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields using circularly polarised X-ray non-resonant scattering. A comprehensive account is presented of the scattering theory and data analysis methods used in our earlier studies, and in addition we present new high magnetic field data and its analysis. We discuss in detail how polarisation analysis was used to reveal structural information, including the arrangement of Tb moments which we proposed for $H = 0$ T, and how the diffraction data for $H<H_C$ can be used to determine specific magnetostrictively induced atomic displacements with femto-metre accuracy. The connection between the electric polarisation and magnetostrictive mechanisms is discussed. Similar magnetostrictive displacements have been observed for $H > H_C$ as for $H < H_C$. Finally some observations regarding the kinetics and the conservation of domain population at the transition are described.
  • The nature of the electronic groundstate of Ba2IrO4 has been addressed using soft X-ray absorption and inelastic scattering techniques in the vicinity of the oxygen K edge. From the polarization and angular dependence of XAS we deduce an approximately equal superposition of xy, yz and zx Ir4+ 5d orbitals. By combining the measured orbital occupancies, with the value of the spin-orbit coupling provided by RIXS, we estimate the crystal field splitting associated with the tetragonal distortion of the IrO6 octahedra to be small, \Delta=50(50) meV. We thus conclude definitively that Ba2IrO4 is a close realization of a spin-orbit Mott insulator with a jeff = 1/2 groundstate, thereby overcoming ambiguities in this assignment associated with the interpretation of X-ray resonant scattering experiments.
  • The resonant X-ray scattering (magnetic elastic, RXMS, and inelastic, RIXS) of Ir$^{4+}$ at the L$_{2,3}$ edges relevant to spin-orbit Mott insulators A$_{n+1}$Ir$_{n}$O$_{3n+1}$ (A=Sr, Ba, etc.) are calculated using a single-ion model which treats the spin-orbit and tetragonal crystal-field terms on an equal footing. Both RXMS and RIXS in the spin-flip channel are found to display a non-trivial dependence on the direction of the magnetic moment, $\boldsymbol\mu$. Crucially, we show that for $\boldsymbol\mu$ in the \emph{ab}-plane, RXMS at the L$_2$ edge is zero \emph{irrespective} of the tetragonal crystal-field; spin-flip RIXS, relevant to measurements of magnons, behaves reciprocally being zero at L$_2$ when $\boldsymbol\mu$ is perpendicular to the \emph{ab}-plane. Our results provide important insights into the interpretation of X-ray data from the iridates, including that a $j_{\mathrm{eff}}=1/2$ ground state cannot be assigned on the basis of L$_2$/L$_3$ intensity ratio alone.
  • The magnetic structure and electronic groundstate of the layered perovskite Ba2IrO4 have been investigated using x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS). Our results are compared with those for Sr2IrO4, for which we provide supplementary data on its magnetic structure. We find that the dominant, long-range antiferromagnetic order is remarkably similar in the two compounds, and that the electronic groundstate in Ba2IrO4, deduced from an investigation of the XRMS $L_3/L_2$ intensity ratio, is consistent with a $J_{eff}=1/2$ description. The robustness of these two key electronic properties to the considerable structural differences between the Ba and Sr analogues is discussed in terms of the enhanced role of the spin-orbit interaction in 5d transition metal oxides.
  • The low-energy electronic structure of the J_{eff}=1/2 spin-orbit insulator Sr3Ir2O7 has been studied by means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. A comparison of the results for bilayer Sr3Ir2O7 with available literature data for the related single-layer compound Sr2IrO4 reveals qualitative similarities and similar J_{eff}=1/2 bandwidths for the two materials, but also pronounced differences in the distribution of the spectral weight. In particuar, photoemission from the J_{eff}=1/2 states appears to be suppressed. Yet, it is found that the Sr3Ir2O7 data are in overall better agreement with band-structure calculations than the data for Sr2IrO4.
  • The metal-insulator transition (MIT) is one of the most dramatic manifestations of electron correlations in materials. Various mechanisms producing MITs have been extensively considered, including the Mott (electron localization via Coulomb repulsion), Anderson (localization via disorder) and Peierls (localization via distortion of a periodic 1D lattice). One additional route to a MIT proposed by Slater, in which long-range magnetic order in a three dimensional system drives the MIT, has received relatively little attention. Using neutron and X-ray scattering we show that the MIT in NaOsO3 is coincident with the onset of long-range commensurate three dimensional magnetic order. Whilst candidate materials have been suggested, our experimental methodology allows the first definitive demonstration of the long predicted Slater MIT. We discuss our results in the light of recent reports of a Mott spin-orbit insulating state in other 5d oxides.
  • This article reports a detailed x-ray resonant scattering study of the bilayer iridate compound, Sr3Ir2O7, at the Ir L2 and L3 edges. Resonant scattering at the Ir L3 edge has been used to determine that Sr3Ir2O7 is a long-range ordered antiferromagnet below TN 230K with an ordering wavevector, q=(1/2,1/2,0). The energy resonance at the L3 edge was found to be a factor of ~30 times larger than that at the L2. This remarkable effect has been seen in the single layer compound Sr2IrO4 and has been linked to the observation of a Jeff=1/2 spin-orbit insulator. Our result shows that despite the modified electronic structure of the bilayer compound, caused by the larger bandwidth, the effect of strong spin-orbit coupling on the resonant magnetic scattering persists. Using the programme SARAh, we have determined that the magnetic order consists of two domains with propagation vectors k1=(1/2,1/2,0) and k2=(1/2,-1/2,0), respectively. A raster measurement of a focussed x-ray beam across the surface of the sample yielded images of domains of the order of 100 microns size, with odd and even L components, respectively. Fully relativistic, monoelectronic calculations (FDMNES), using the Green's function technique for a muffin-tin potential have been employed to calculate the relative intensities of the L2,3 edge resonances, comparing the effects of including spin-orbit coupling and the Hubbard, U, term. A large L3 to L2 edge intensity ratio (~5) was found for calculations including spin-orbit coupling. Adding the Hubbard, U, term resulted in changes to the intensity ratio <5%.
  • Magneto-electric multiferroics exemplified by TbMnO3 possess both magnetic and ferroelectric long-range order. The magnetic order is mostly understood, whereas the nature of the ferroelectricity has remained more elusive. Competing models proposed to explain the ferroelectricity are associated respectively with charge transfer and ionic displacements. Exploiting the magneto-electric coupling, we use an electric field to produce a single magnetic domain state, and a magnetic field to induce ionic displacements. Under these conditions, interference charge-magnetic X-ray scattering arises, encoding the amplitude and phase of the displacements. When combined with a theoretical analysis, our data allow us to resolve the ionic displacements at the femtoscale, and show that such displacements make a significant contribution to the zero-field ferroelectric moment.
  • The magnetic structures adopted by the Fe and Sm sublattices in SmFeAsO have been investigated using element specific x-ray resonant and non-resonant magnetic scattering techniques. Between 110 and 5 K, the Sm and Fe moments are aligned along the c and a directions, respectively according to the same magnetic representation $\Gamma_{5}$ and the same propagation vector (1, 0, 0.5). Below 5 K, magnetic order of both sublattices change to a different magnetic structure and the Sm moments reorder in a magnetic unit cell equal to the chemical unit cell. Modeling of the temperature dependence for the Sm sublattice as well as a change in the magnetic structure below 5 K provide a clear evidence of a surprisingly strong coupling between the two sublattices, and indicate the need to include anisotropic exchange interactions in models of SmFeAsO and related compounds.
  • The low energy phonons of two different graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) have been measured as a function of temperature using inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS). In the case of the non-superconductor BaC6, the phonons observed are significantly higher (up to 20 %) in energy than those predicted by theory, in contrast to the reasonable agreement found in superconducting CaC6. Additional IXS intensity is observed below 15 meV in both BaC6 and CaC6. It has been previously suggested that this additional inelastic intensity may arise from defect or vacancy modes in these compounds, unpredicted by theory (d'Astuto et al, Phys. Rev. B 81 104519 (2010)). Here it is shown that this additional intensity can arise directly from the large disorder of the available samples. Our results show that future theoretical work is required to understand the relationship between the crystal structure, the phonons and the superconductivity in GICs.
  • The out-of-plane intercalate phonons of superconducting YbC6 have been measured with inelastic x-ray scattering. Model fits to this data, and previously measured out-of-plane intercalate phonons in graphite intercalation compounds (GICs), reveal surprising trends with the superconducting transition temperature. These trends suggest that superconducting GICs should be viewed as electron-doped graphite.