• Laser-plasma acceleration is an emerging technique for accelerating electrons to high energies over very short distances. The accelerated electron bunches have femtosecond duration, making them particularly relevant for applications such as ultrafast imaging or femtosecond X-ray generation. Current laser-plasma accelerators are typically driven by Joule-class laser systems that have two main drawbacks: their relatively large scale and their low repetition-rate, with a few shots per second at best. The accelerated electron beams have energies ranging from 100 MeV to multi-GeV, however a MeV electron source would be more suited to many societal and scientific applications. Here, we demonstrate a compact and reliable laser-plasma accelerator producing high-quality few-MeV electron beams at kilohertz repetition rate. This breakthrough was made possible by using near-single-cycle light pulses, which lowered the required laser energy for driving the accelerator by three orders of magnitude, thus enabling high repetition-rate operation and dramatic downsizing of the laser system. The measured electron bunches are collimated, with an energy distribution that peaks at 5 MeV and contains up to 1 pC of charge. Numerical simulations reproduce all experimental features and indicate that the electron bunches are only $\sim 1$ fs long. We anticipate that the advent of these kHz femtosecond relativistic electron sources will pave the way to wide-impact applications, such as ultrafast electron diffraction in materials with an unprecedented sub-10 fs resolution.
  • We study the photoionization of argon atoms close to the 3s$^2$3p$^6$ $\rightarrow$ 3s$^1$3p$^6$4p $\leftrightarrow$ 3s$^2$3p$^5$ $\varepsilon \ell$, $\ell$=s,d Fano window resonance. An interferometric technique using an attosecond pulse train, i.e. a frequency comb in the extreme ultraviolet range, and a weak infrared probe field allows us to study both amplitude and phase of the photoionization probability amplitude as a function of photon energy. A theoretical calculation of the ionization process accounting for several continuum channels and bandwidth effects reproduces well the experimental observations and shows that the phase variation of the resonant two-photon amplitude depends on the interaction between the channels involved in the autoionization process.
  • We present experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of photoionization time delays from the $3s$ and $3p$ shells in Ar in the photon energy range of 32-42 eV. The experimental measurements are performed by interferometry using attosecond pulse trains and the infrared laser used for their generation. The theoretical approach includes intershell correlation effects between the 3s and 3p shells within the framework of the random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE). The connection between single-photon ionization and the two-color two-photon ionization process used in the measurement is established using the recently developed asymptotic approximation for the complex transition amplitudes of laser-assisted photoionization. We compare and discuss the theoretical and experimental results especially in the region where strong intershell correlations in the 3s to kp channel lead to an induced "Cooper" minimum in the 3s ionization cross-section.
  • We study the temporal aspects of laser-assisted extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photoionization using attosecond pulses of harmonic radiation. The aim of this paper is to establish the general form of the phase of the relevant transition amplitudes and to make the connection with the time-delays that have been recently measured in experiments. We find that the overall phase contains two distinct types of contributions: one is expressed in terms of the phase-shifts of the photoelectron continuum wavefunction while the other is linked to continuum--continuum transitions induced by the infrared (IR) laser probe. Our formalism applies to both kinds of measurements reported so far, namely the ones using attosecond pulse trains of XUV harmonics and the others based on the use of isolated attosecond pulses (streaking). The connection between the phases and the time-delays is established with the help of finite difference approximations to the energy derivatives of the phases. This makes clear that the observed time-delays is a sum of two components: a one-photon Wigner-like delay and an universal delay that originates from the probing process itself.
  • We study photoionization of argon atoms excited by attosecond pulses using an interferometric measurement technique. We measure the difference in time delays between electrons emitted from the $3s^2$ and from the $3p^6$ shell, at different excitation energies ranging from 32 to 42 eV. The determination of single photoemission time delays requires to take into account the measurement process, involving the interaction with a probing infrared field. This contribution can be estimated using an universal formula and is found to account for a substantial fraction of the measured delay.
  • We report on a novel non-invasive method to determine the normal mode frequencies of ion Coulomb crystals in traps based on the resonance enhanced collective coupling between the electronic states of the ions and an optical cavity field at the single photon level. Excitations of the normal modes are observed through a Doppler broadening of the resonance. An excellent agreement with the predictions of a zero-temperature uniformly charged liquid plasma model is found. The technique opens up for investigations of the heating and damping of cold plasma modes, as well as the coupling between them.