• Using Keck/HIRES spectra {\Delta}v ~ 7 km/s, we analyze forbidden lines of [O I] 6300 {\AA}, [O I] 5577 {\AA} and [S II] 6731 {\AA} from 33 T Tauri stars covering a range of disk evolutionary stages. After removing a high velocity component (HVC) associated with microjets, we study the properties of the low velocity component (LVC). The LVC can be attributed to slow disk winds that could be magnetically (MHD) or thermally (photoevaporative) driven. Both of these winds play an important role in the evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary material. LVC emission is seen in all 30 stars with detected [O I] but only in 2 out of eight with detected [S II] , so our analysis is largely based on the properties of the [O I] LVC. The LVC itself is resolved into broad (BC) and narrow (NC) kinematic components. Both components are found over a wide range of accretion rates and their luminosity is correlated with the accretion luminosity, but the NC is proportionately stronger than the BC in transition disks. The FWHM of both the BC and NC correlates with disk inclination, consistent with Keplerian broadening from radii of 0.05 to 0.5 AU and 0.5 to 5 AU, respectively. The velocity centroids of the BC suggest formation in an MHD disk wind, with the largest blueshifts found in sources with closer to face-on orientations. The velocity centroids of the NC however, show no dependence on disk inclination. The origin of this component is less clear and the evidence for photoevaporation is not conclusive.
  • We present a detailed analysis of narrow of NaI and KI absorption resonance lines toward nearly 40 T Tauri stars in Taurus with the goal of clarifying their origin. The NaI 5889.95 angstrom line is detected toward all but one source, while the weaker KI 7698.96 angstrom line in about two thirds of the sample. The similarity in their peak centroids and the significant positive correlation between their equivalent widths demonstrate that these transitions trace the same atomic gas. The absorption lines are present towards both disk and diskless young stellar objects, which excludes cold gas within the circumstellar disk as the absorbing material. A comparison of NaI and CO detections and peak centroids demonstrates that the atomic and molecular gas are not co-located, the atomic gas is more extended than the molecular gas. The width of the atomic lines corroborates this finding and points to atomic gas about an order of magnitude warmer than the molecular gas. The distribution of NaI radial velocities shows a clear spatial gradient along the length of the Taurus molecular cloud filaments. This suggests that absorption is associated with the Taurus molecular cloud. Assuming the gradient is due to cloud rotation, the rotation of the atomic gas is consistent with differential galactic rotation while the rotation of the molecular gas, although with the same rotation axis, is retrograde. Our analysis shows that narrow NaI and KI absorption resonance lines are useful tracers of the atomic envelope of molecular clouds. In line with recent findings from giant molecular clouds, our results demonstrate that the velocity fields of the atomic and molecular gas are misaligned. The angular momentum of a molecular cloud is not simply inherited from the rotating Galactic disk from which it formed but may be redistributed by cloud-cloud interactions.
  • We have mapped the superwind/halo region of the nearby starburst galaxy M82 in the mid-infrared with $Spitzer-IRS$. The spectral regions covered include the H$_2 S(1)-S(3)$, [NeII], [NeIII] emission lines and PAH features. We estimate the total warm H$_2$ mass and the kinetic energy of the outflowing warm molecular gas to be between $M_{warm}\sim5-17\times10^6$ M$_{\odot}$ and $E_{K}\sim6-20\times10^{53}$ erg. Using the ratios of the 6.2, 7.7 and 11.3 micron PAH features in the IRS spectra, we are able to estimate the average size and ionization state of the small grains in the superwind. There are large variations in the PAH flux ratios throughout the outflow. The 11.3/7.7 and the 6.2/7.7 PAH ratios both vary by more than a factor of five across the wind region. The Northern part of the wind has a significant population of PAH's with smaller 6.2/7.7 ratios than either the starburst disk or the Southern wind, indicating that on average, PAH emitters are larger and more ionized. The warm molecular gas to PAH flux ratios (H$_2/PAH$) are enhanced in the outflow by factors of 10-100 as compared to the starburst disk. This enhancement in the H$_2/PAH$ ratio does not seem to follow the ionization of the atomic gas (as measured with the [NeIII]/[NeII] line flux ratio) in the outflow. This suggests that much of the warm H$_2$ in the outflow is excited by shocks. The observed H$_2$ line intensities can be reproduced with low velocity shocks ($v < 40$ km s$^{-1}$) driven into moderately dense molecular gas ($10^2 <n_H < 10^4$ cm$^{-3}$) entrained in the outflow.
  • The amount of high-energy stellar radiation reaching the surface of protoplanetary disks is essential to determine their chemistry and physical evolution. Here, we use millimetric and centimetric radio data to constrain the EUV luminosity impinging on 14 disks around young (~2-10Myr) sun-like stars. For each object we identify the long-wavelength emission in excess to the dust thermal emission, attribute that to free-free disk emission, and thereby compute an upper limit to the EUV reaching the disk. We find upper limits lower than 10$^{42}$ photons/s for all sources without jets and lower than $5 \times 10^{40}$ photons/s for the three older sources in our sample. These latter values are low for EUV-driven photoevaporation alone to clear out protoplanetary material in the timescale inferred by observations. In addition, our EUV upper limits are too low to reproduce the [NeII] 12.81 micron luminosities from three disks with slow [NeII]-detected winds. This indicates that the [NeII] line in these sources primarily traces a mostly neutral wind where Ne is ionized by 1 keV X-ray photons, implying higher photoevaporative mass loss rates than those predicted by EUV-driven models alone. In summary, our results suggest that high-energy stellar photons other than EUV may dominate the dispersal of protoplanetary disks around sun-like stars.
  • Recent infrared observations have demonstrated that photoevaporation driven by high-energy photons from the central star contributes to the dispersal of protoplanetary disks. Here, we show that photoevaporative winds should produce a detectable free-free continuum emission given the range of stellar ionizing photons and X-ray luminosities inferred for young sun-like stars. We point out that VLA observations of the nearby disk around TWHya might have already detected this emission at centimeter wavelengths and calculate the wind electron density and mass flow rate. We also estimate the intensities of H radio recombination lines tracing the wind and discuss which ones could be detected with current instrumentation. The detection and profiles of these recombination lines would unambiguously prove our inference of free-free emission from photoevaporating disks like TWHya. In addition, radio/millimeter data can help constraining wind parameters such as temperature and electron density that are fundamental in measuring mass flow rates.
  • Photoevaporation driven by the central star is expected to be a ubiquitous and important mechanism to disperse the circumstellar dust and gas from which planets form. Here, we present a detailed study of the circumstellar disk surrounding the nearby star TW Hya and provide observational constraints to its photoevaporative wind. Our new high-resolution (R ~ 30,000) mid-infrared spectroscopy in the [Ne II] 12.81 {\mu}m line confirms that this gas diagnostic traces the unbound wind component within 10AU from the star. From the blueshift and asymmetry in the line profile, we estimate that most (>80%) of the [Ne II] emission arises from disk radii where the midplane is optically thick to the redshifted outflowing gas, meaning beyond the 1 or 4AU dust rim inferred from other observations. We re-analyze high-resolution (R ~ 48, 000) archival optical spectra searching for additional transitions that may trace the photoevaporative flow. Unlike the [Ne II] line, optical forbidden lines from OI, SII, and MgI are centered at the stellar velocity and have symmetric profiles. The only way these lines could trace the photoevaporative flow is if they arise from a disk region physically distinct from that traced by the [Ne II] line, specifically from within the optically thin dust gap. However, the small (~10 km/s) FWHM of these lines suggest that most of the emitting gas traced at optical wavelengths is bound to the system rather than unbound. We discuss the implications of our results for a planet-induced versus a photoevaporation-induced gap.
  • We report the first detection of chloronium, H$_2$Cl$^+$, in the interstellar medium, using the HIFI instrument aboard the \emph{Herschel} Space Observatory. The $2_{12}-1_{01}$ lines of ortho-H$_2^{35}$Cl$^+$ and ortho-H$_2^{37}$Cl$^+$ are detected in absorption towards NGC~6334I, and the $1_{11}-0_{00}$ transition of para-H$_2^{35}$Cl$^+$ is detected in absorption towards NGC~6334I and Sgr~B2(S). The H$_2$Cl$^+$ column densities are compared to those of the chemically-related species HCl. The derived HCl/H$_2$Cl$^+$ column density ratios, $\sim$1--10, are within the range predicted by models of diffuse and dense Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs). However, the observed H$_2$Cl$^+$ column densities, in excess of $10^{13}$~cm$^{-2}$, are significantly higher than the model predictions. Our observations demonstrate the outstanding spectroscopic capabilities of HIFI for detecting new interstellar molecules and providing key constraints for astrochemical models.
  • This paper is one in a series presenting results obtained within the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS) Legacy Science Program on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Here we present a study of dust processing and growth in seven protoplanetary disks. Our spectra indicate that the circumstellar silicate dust grains have grown to sizes at least 10 times larger than observed in the interstellar medium, and show evidence for a non-negligible (~5 % in mass fractions) contribution from crystalline species. These results are similar to those of other studies of protoplanetary disks. In addition, we find a correlation between the strength of the amorphous silicate feature and the shape of the spectral energy distribution. This latter result is consistent with the growth and subsequent gravitational settling of dust grains towards the disk mid-plane. Further, we find a change in the relative abundance of the different crystalline species: more enstatite relative to forsterite is observed in the inner warm dust population at ~1 AU, while forsterite dominates in the colder outer regions at ~5 to 15 AU. This change in the relative abundances argues for a localized crystallization process rather than a radial mixing scenario where crystalline silicates are being transported outwards from a single formation region in the hot inner parts of the disk. Last, we report the detection of emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in five out of seven sources. We find a tentative PAH band at 8.2 micron, previously undetected in the spectra of disks around low-mass pre-main-sequence stars.
  • We report observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST) regarding the frequency of 24 micron excess emission toward sun-like stars. Our unbiased sample is comprised of 309 stars with masses 0.7-2.2 Msun and ages from <3 Myr to >3 Gyr that lack excess emission at wavelengths <=8 microns. We identify 30 stars that exhibit clear evidence of excess emission from the observed 24/8 micron flux ratio. The implied 24 micron excesses of these candidate debris disk systems range from 13 % (the minimum detectable) to more than 100 % compared to the expected photospheric emission. The frequency of systems with evidence for dust debris emitting at 24 micron ranges from 8.5-19 % at ages <300 Myr to < 4 % for older stars. The results suggest that many, perhaps most, sun-like stars might form terrestrial planets.
  • We report the detection of [Ne II] emission at 12.81 micron in four out of the six optically thick dust disks observed as part of the FEPS Spitzer Legacy program. In addition, we detect a H I(7-6) emission line at 12.37 micron from the source RXJ1852.3-3700. Detections of [Ne II] lines are favored by low mid-infrared excess emission. Both stellar X-rays and extreme UV (EUV) photons can sufficiently ionize the disk surface to reproduce the observed line fluxes, suggesting that emission from Ne+ originates in the hot disk atmosphere. On the other hand, the H I(7-6) line is not associated with the gas in the disk surface and magnetospheric accretion flows can account only for at most ~30% of the observed flux. We conclude that accretion shock regions and/or the stellar corona could contribute to most of the H I(7-6)emission. Finally, we discuss the observations necessary to identify whether stellar X-rays or EUV photons are the dominant ionization mechanism for Ne atoms. Because the observed [Ne II] emission probes very small amounts of gas in the disk surface (~10^{-6} Jupiter masses) we suggest using this gas line to determine the presence or absence of gas in more evolved circumstellar disks.
  • [abridged] We present observations of the dust and atomic gas phase in seven dwarf irregular galaxies of the M81 group from the SINGS and THINGS surveys. The Spitzer observations provide a first glimpse of the nature of the non-atomic ISM in these metal-poor (Z~0.1 Z_sun), quiescent (SFR~0.001-0.1 M_sun/yr) dwarf galaxies. Dust emission is detected in five out of the seven targets. Most detected dust emission is restricted to HI column densities >1x10^21 cm^-2. Spitzer spectroscopy of two regions in the brightest galaxies (IC 2574 and Holmberg II) show distinctly different spectral shapes. The spectrum of IC 2574 shows aromatic features that are less luminous (relative to the FIR luminosity) compared to an average SINGS spiral galaxy by a factor of \~7 . The aromatic features in Holmberg~II (which has only a slightly lower gas-phase metallicity) are fainter than in IC 2574 by an order of magnitude. This result emphazises that the strength of the aromatic features is not a simple linear function of metallicity. We estimate dust masses of ~10^4-10^6 M_sun for the M81 dwarf galaxies, resulting in an average dust--to--gas ratio (M_dust/M_HI) of ~3x10^-4 (1.5x10^-3 if only the HI that is associated with dust emission is considered); this is an order of magnitude lower than the typical value derived for the SINGS spirals. The dwarf galaxies are underluminous per unit star formation rate at 70um as compared to the more massive galaxies in SINGS by a factor of ~2. However, the average 70um/160um ratio in the sample dwarf galaxies is higher than what is found in the other galaxies of the SINGS sample. This can be explained by a combination of a lower dust content in conjunction with a higher dust temperature in the dwarfs.
  • We have carried out a sensitive search for gas emission lines at infrared and millimeter wavelengths for a sample of 15 young sun-like stars selected from our dust disk survey with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We have used mid-infrared lines to trace the warm (300-100 K) gas in the inner disk and millimeter transitions of 12CO to probe the cold (~20 K) outer disk. We report no gas line detections from our sample. Line flux upper limits are first converted to warm and cold gas mass limits using simple approximations allowing a direct comparison with values from the literature. We also present results from more sophisticated models following Gorti and Hollenbach (2004) which confirm and extend our simple analysis. These models show that the SI line at 25.23 micron can set constraining limits on the gas surface density at the disk inner radius and traces disk regions up to a few AU. We find that none of the 15 systems have more than 0.04 MJ of gas within a few AU from the disk inner radius for disk radii from 1 AU up to ~40 AU. These gas mass upper limits even in the 8 systems younger than ~30 Myr suggest that most of the gas is dispersed early. The gas mass upper limits in the 10-40 AU region, that is mainly traced by our CO data, are <2 Mearth. If these systems are analogs of the Solar System, either they have already formed Uranus- and Neptune-like planets or they will not form them beyond 100 Myr. Finally, the gas surface density upper limits at 1 AU are smaller than 0.01% of the minimum mass solar nebula for most of the sources. If terrestrial planets form frequently and their orbits are circularized by gas, then circularization occurs early.
  • We present new images (groundbased optical and mid-infrared (MIR) from the Spitzer Space Telescope) and spectra (from Spitzer) of the archetypal starburst galaxy M 82. The Spitzer data show that the MIR emission extends at least 6 kpc along the minor axis of the galaxy. We use the optical and infrared data to demonstrate that the extended emission is dominated by emission from dust. The colors of the MIR emission and the spectra indicate that there is a strong component of aromatic feature emission (the MIR features commonly attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). The dust continuum and aromatic feature emission are both strong in the well-known superwind region of this galaxy; clearly the carrier of the aromatic features can survive in close proximity to the wind, far from the plane of the galaxy. We also see significant emission by dust well outside the superwind region, providing the clearest picture to date of the dust distribution in the halo of this galaxy.
  • We present Spitzer 3.6-160 micron images, Spitzer mid-infrared spectra, and JCMT SCUBA 850 micron images of the Sombrero Galaxy (NGC 4594), an Sa galaxy with a 10^9 M_solar low luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN). The brightest infrared sources in the galaxy are the nucleus and the dust ring. The spectral energy distribution of the AGN demonstrates that, while the environment around the AGN is a prominent source of mid-infrared emission, it is a relatively weak source of far-infrared emission, as had been inferred for AGN in previous research. The weak nuclear 160 micron emission and the negligible polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission from the nucleus also implies that the nucleus is a site of only weak star formation activity and the nucleus contains relatively little cool interstellar gas needed to fuel such activity. We propose that this galaxy may be representative of a subset of low ionization nuclear emission region galaxies that are in a quiescent AGN phase because of the lack of gas needed to fuel circumnuclear star formation and Seyfert-like AGN activity. Surprisingly, the AGN is the predominant source of 850 micron emission. We examine the possible emission mechanisms that could give rise to the 850 micron emission and find that neither thermal dust emission, CO line emission, bremsstrahlung emission, nor the synchrotron emission observed at radio wavelengths can adequately explain the measured 850 micron flux density by themselves. The remaining possibilities for the source of the 850 micron emission include a combination of known emission mechanisms, synchrotron emission that is self-absorbed at wavelengths longer than 850 microns, or unidentified spectral lines in the 850 micron band.
  • We review advances in the modeling of protoplanetary disks. This review will focus on the regions of the disk beyond the dust sublimation radius, i.e. beyond 0.1 - 1 AU, depending on the stellar luminosity. We will be mostly concerned with models that aim to fit spectra of the dust continuum or gas lines, and derive physical parameters from these fits. For optically thick disks, these parameters include the accretion rate through the disk onto the star, the geometry of the disk, the dust properties, the surface chemistry and the thermal balance of the gas. For the latter we are mostly concerned with the upper layers of the disk, where the gas and dust temperature decouple and a photoevaporative flow may originate. We also briefly discuss optically thin disks, focusing mainly on the gas, not the dust. The evolution of these disks is dominated by accretion, viscous spreading, photoevaporation, and dust settling and coagulation. The density and temperature structure arising from the surface layer models provide input to models of photoevaporation, which occurs largely in the outer disk. We discuss the consequences of photoevaporation on disk evolution and planet formation.
  • Recent observations of the ground state transition of HDO at 464 GHz towards the protoplanetary disk of DM Tau have detected the presence of water vapor in the regions just above the outer disk midplane (Ceccarelli et al 2005). In the absence of non-thermal desorption processes, water should be almost entirely frozen onto the grain mantles and HDO undetectable. In this Letter we present a chemical model that explores the possibility that the icy mantles are photo-desorbed by FUV (6eV < h nu < 13.6eV) photons. We show that the average Interstellar FUV field is enough to create a layer of water vapor above the disk midplane over the entire disk. Assuming a photo-desorption yield of 10^{-3}, the water abundance in this layer is predicted to be ~ 3 x 10^{-7} and the average H2O column density is ~ 1.6x 10^{15} cm^{-2}. The predictions are very weakly dependent on the details of the model, like the incident FUV radiation field, and the gas density in the disk. Based on this model, we predict a gaseous HDO/H2O ratio in DM Tau of ~1%. In addition, we predict the ground state transition of water at 557 GHz to be undetectable with ODIN and/or HSO-HIFI.
  • We report infrared spectroscopic observations of HD 105, a nearby ($\sim 40$ pc) and relatively young ($\sim 30$ Myr) G0 star with excess infrared continuum emission, which has been modeled as arising from an optically thin circumstellar dust disk with an inner hole of size $\gtrsim 13$ AU. We have used the high spectral resolution mode of the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope to search for gas emission lines from the disk. The observations reported here provide upper limits to the fluxes of H$_2$ S(0) 28$\mu$m, H$_2$ S(1) 17$\mu$m, H$_2$ S(2) 12 $\mu$m, [FeII] 26$\mu$m, [SiII] 35$\mu$m, and [SI] 25$\mu$m infrared emission lines. The H$_2$ line upper limits directly place constraints on the mass of warm molecular gas in the disk: $M({\rm H_2})< 4.6$, 3.8$\times 10^{-2}$, and $3.0\times 10^{-3}$ M$_J$ at $T= 50$, 100, and 200 K, respectively. We also compare the line flux upper limits to predictions from detailed thermal/chemical models of various gas distributions in the disk. These comparisons indicate that if the gas distribution has an inner hole with radius $r_{i,gas}$, the surface density at that inner radius is limited to values ranging from $\lesssim 3$ gm cm$^{-2}$ at $r_{i,gas}=0.5$ AU to 0.1 gm cm$^{-2}$ at $r_{i,gas}= 5-20$ AU. These values are considerably below the value for a minimum mass solar nebula, and suggest that less than 1 M$_J$ of gas (at any temperature) exists in the 1-40 AU planet-forming region. Therefore, it is unlikely that there is sufficient gas for gas giant planet formation to occur in HD 105 at this time.
  • We present 3-160 micron photometry obtained with the IRAC and MIPS instruments for the first five targets from the Spitzer Legacy Science Program "Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems" and 4-35 micron spectro-photometry obtained with the IRS for two sources. We discuss in detail our observations of the debris disks surrounding HD 105 (G0V, 30 +- 10 Myr) and HD 150706 (G3V, ~ 700 +- 300 Myr). For HD 105, possible interpretations include large bodies clearing the dust inside of 45 AU or a reservoir of gas capable of sculpting the dust distribution. The disk surrounding HD 150706 also exhibits evidence of a large inner hole in its dust distribution. Of the four survey targets without previously detected IR excess, spanning ages 30 Myr to 3 Gyr, the new detection of excess in just one system of intermediate age suggests a variety of initial conditions or divergent evolutionary paths for debris disk systems orbiting solar-type stars.
  • Much of the interstellar medium in disk galaxies is in the form of neutral atomic hydrogen, H I. This gas can be in thermal equilibrium at relatively low temperatures, T < 300 K (the cold neutral medium, or CNM) or at temperatures somewhat less than 10^4 K (the warm neutral medium, or WNM). These two phases can coexist over a narrow range of pressures, P_min < P < P_max. We determine P_min and P_max in the plane of the Galaxy as a function of Galactocentric radius R using recent determinations of the gas heating rate and the gas phase abundances of interstellar gas. We provide an analytic approximation for P_min as a function of metallicity, far-ultraviolet radiation field, and the ionization rate of atomic hydrogen. Over most of the disk of the Galaxy, the H I must be in two phases: the weight of the H I in the gravitational potential of the Galaxy is large enough to generate thermal pressures exceeding P_min, so that turbulent pressure fluctuations can produce cold gas that is thermally stable; and the mean density of the H I is too low for the gas to be all CNM. Our models predict the presence of CNM gas to R = 16-18 kpc, somewhat farther than previous estimates. We also examine the potential impact of turbulent heating on our results and provide expressions for the heating rate as a function of Galactic radius.
  • We will utilize the sensitivity of SIRTF through the Legacy Science Program to carry out spectrophotometric observations of solar-type stars aimed at (1) defining the timescales over which terrestrial and gas giant planets are built, from measurements diagnostic of dust/gas masses and radial distributions; and (2) establishing the diversity of planetary architectures and the frequency of planetesimal collisions as a function of time through observations of circumstellar debris disks. Together, these observations will provide an astronomical context for understanding whether our solar system - and its habitable planet - is a common or a rare circumstance. Achieving our science goals requires measuring precise spectral energy distributions for a statistically robust sample capable of revealing evolutionary trends and the diversity of system outcomes. Our targets have been selected from two carefully assembled databases of solar-like stars: (1) a sample located within 50 pc of the Sun spanning an age range from 100-3000 Myr for which a rich set of ancillary measurements (e.g. metallicity, stellar activity, kinematics) are available; and (2) a selection located between 15 and 180 pc and spanning ages from 3 to 100 Myr. For stars at these distances SIRTF is capable of detecting stellar photospheres with SNR >30 at lambda < 24 microns for our entire sample, as well as achieving SNR >5 at the photospheric limit for over 50% of our sample at lambda=70 microns. Thus we will provide a complete census of stars with excess emission down to the level produced by the dust in our present-day solar system. More information concerning our program can be found at: http://gould.as.arizona.edu/feps
  • The most important cooling lines of the neutral interstellar medium (ISM) lie in the far-infrared (FIR). We present measurements by the Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer of seven lines from neutral and ionized ISM of 60 normal, star-forming galaxies. The galaxy sample spans a range in properties such as morphology, FIR colors (indicating dust temperature), and FIR/Blue ratios (indicating star-formation activity and optical depth). In two-thirds of the galaxies in this sample, the [CII] line is proportional to FIR dust continuum. The other one-third show a smooth decline in [CII]/FIR with increasing F60/F100 and FIR/B, spanning a range of a factor of more than 50. Two galaxies, at the warm and active extreme of the range have [CII]/FIR < 2 \times 10^{-4} (3-sigma upper limit). This is due to increased positive grain charge in the warmer and more active galaxies, which leads to less efficient heating by photoelectrons from dust grains. The ratio of the two principal photodissociation region (PDR) cooling lines [CII]/[OI] shows a tight correlation with F60/F100, indicating that both gas and dust temperatures increase together. We derive a theoretical scaling between [NII] and [CII] from ionized gas and use it to separate [CII] emission from neutral PDRs and ionized gas. Comparison of PDR models of Kaufman et al. (1999) with observed ratios of (a) [OI]/[CII] and ([CII]+[OI])/FIR and (b) [OI]/FIR and F60/F100 yields far-UV flux G0 and gas density n. The derived G0 scales as n to the power 1.4. We interpret this correlation as arising from Stromgren sphere scalings if much of the line and continuum luminosity arises near star-forming regions. The differences in G0 and n may be due to differences in the physical properties of the star-forming clouds.(Short abstract)
  • Four IRAS-detected early type galaxies were observed with ISO. With the exception of the 15 micron image of NGC1052, the mid-IR emission from NGC1052, NGC1155, NGC5866 and NGC6958 at 4.5, 7 and 15 microns show extended emission. Mid-IR emission from NGC1052, NGC1155, and NGC6958 follows a de Vaucouleurs profile. The ratio of 15/7 micron flux decreases with radius in these galaxies, approaching the values empirically observed for purely stellar systems. In NGC5866, the 7 and 15 micron emission is concentrated in the edge-on dust lane. All the galaxies are detected in the [CII] line, and the S0s NGC1155 and NGC5866 are detected in the [OI] line as well. The ISO-LWS observations of the [CII] line are more sensitive measures of cool, neutral ISM than HI and CO by about a factor of 10-100. Three of four early type galaxies, namely NGC1052, NGC6958 and NGC5866, have low ratio FIR/Blue and show a lower [CII]/FIR, which is due to a softer radiation field from old stellar populations. The low [CII]/CO ratio in NGC5866 ([CII]/CO(1-0) < 570) confirms this scenario. We estimate the UV radiation expected from the old stellar populations in these galaxies and compare it to that needed to heat the gas to account for the cooling observed [CII] and [OI] lines. In three out of four galaxies, NGC1052, NGC5866 and NGC6958, the predicted UV radiation falls short by a factor of 2-3. In view of the observed intrinsic scatter in the "UV-upturn" in elliptical galaxies and its great sensitivity to age and metallicity effects, this is not significant. However, the much larger difference (about a factor of 20) between the UV radiation from old stars and that needed to produce the FIR lines for NGC 1155 is strong evidence for the presence of young stars, in NGC1155.
  • We report measurements of the [CII] fine structure line at 157.714 micron in 30 normal star-forming galaxies with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) on the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The ratio of the line to total far-infrared luminosity, [CII]/FIR, measures the ratio of the cooling of gas to that of dust; and thus the efficiency of the grain photoelectric heating process. This ratio varies by a factor of 40 in the current sample. About two-thirds of the galaxies have [CII]/FIR = 2-7 x 10^{-3}. The other one-third show trends of decreasing [CII]/FIR with increasing dust temperature, indicated by the ratio of infrared emission at 60 and 100 microns; and with increasing star-formation activity, measured by the ratio of far-infrared and blue band luminosity. We find three FIR bright galaxies with undetected [CII] line at 3-sigma upper limits of [CII]/FIR < 0.5-2 x 10^{-4}. The trend in the [CII]/FIR ratio with the temperature of dust and with star-formation activity may be due to decreased efficiency of photoelectric heating of gas at high UV radiation intensity as dust grains become positively charged, decreasing the yield and the energy of the photoelectrons. The three galaxies with no observed PDR lines have among the highest ratios of FIR to Blue luminosity and the ratio of 60 and 100 micron emission. Their lack of [CII] lines may be due to a continuing trend of decreasing [CII]/FIR with increasing star-formation activity and dust temperature seen in one-third of the sample with warm IRAS colors. In that case the upper limits on [CII]/FIR imply a ratio of UV flux to gas density G_0/n > 10 cm$^3. The low [CII]/FIR could also be due to either weak [CII] because of self-absorption or strong FIR continuum from regions weak in [CII], such as dense HII regions or plasma ionized by hard radiation of AGNs.