• We report a correlation based on a spectral simulation study of the prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). The correlation is between the Epeak energy, which is the peak energy in the \nu F_\nu spectrum, and the photon index (\Gamma) derived from a simple power-law model. The Epeak - \Gamma relation, assuming the typical smoothly broken power-law spectrum of GRBs, is \log Epeak = 3.258 - 0.829\Gamma (1.3 < \Gamma < 2.3). We take into account not only a range of Epeak energies and fluences, but also distributions for both the low-energy photon index and the high-energy photon index in the smoothly broken power-law model. The distribution of burst durations in the BAT GRB sample is also included in the simulation. Our correlation is consistent with the index observed by BAT and Epeak measured by the BAT, and by other GRB instruments. Since about 85% of GRBs observed by the BAT are acceptably fit with the simple power-law model because of the relatively narrow energy range of the BAT, this relationship can be used to estimate Epeak when it is located within the BAT energy range.
  • We describe and discuss the spectral and temporal characteristics of the prompt emission and X-ray afterglow emission of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray-rich gamma-ray bursts (XRRs) detected and observed by Swift between December 2004 and September 2006. We compare these characteristics to a sample of conventional classical gamma-ray bursts (C-GRBs) observed during the same period. We confirm the correlation between Epeak_obs and fluence noted by others and find further evidence that XRFs, XRRs and C-GRBs form a continuum. We also confirm that our known redshift sample is consistent with the correlation between the peak energy in the GRB rest frame (Epeak_src) and the isotropic radiated energy (Eiso), so called the Epeak_src-Eiso relation. The spectral properties of X-ray afterglows of XRFs and C-GRBs are similar, but the temporal properties of XRFs and C-GRBs are quite different. We found that the light curves of C-GRB afterglows show a break to steeper indices (shallow-to-steep break) at much earlier times than do XRF afterglows. Moreover, the overall luminosity of XRF X-ray afterglows is systematically smaller by a factor of two or more compared to that of C-GRBs. These distinct differences between the X-ray afterglows of XRFs and C-GRBs may be the key to understanding not only the mysterious shallow-to-steep break in X-ray afterglow light curves, but also the unique nature of XRFs.
  • We present the first Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which contains bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2007 June 16. This catalog (hereafter BAT1 catalog) contains burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, and time averaged spectral parameters for each of 237 GRBs, as measured by the BAT. The BAT-determined position reported here is within 1.75' of the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT)-determined position for 90% of these GRBs. The BAT T_90 and T_50 durations peak at 80 and 20 seconds, respectively. From the fluence-fluence correlation, we conclude that about 60% of the observed peak energies, Epeak, of BAT GRBs could be less than 100 keV. We confirm that GRB fluence to hardness and GRB peak flux to hardness are correlated for BAT bursts in analogous ways to previous missions' results. The correlation between the photon index in a simple power-law model and Epeak is also confirmed. We also report the current status for the on-orbit BAT calibrations based on observations of the Crab Nebula.
  • We analyze Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray afterglows for three GRBs with spectroscopic redshift determinations -- GRB 050401, XRF 050416a, and GRB 050525a. We find that the relation between spectral peak energy and isotropic energy of prompt emissions (the Amati relation) is consistent with that for the bursts observed in pre-Swift era. However, we find that the X-ray afterglow lightcurves, which extend up to 10-70 days, show no sign of the jet break that is expected in the standard framework of collimated outflows. We do so by showing that none of the X-ray afterglow lightcurves in our sample satisfies the relation between the spectral and temporal indices that is predicted for the phase after jet break. The jet break time can be predicted by inverting the tight empirical relation between the peak energy of the spectrum and the collimation-corrected energy of the prompt emission (the Ghirlanda relation). We find that there are no temporal breaks within the predicted time intervals in X-ray band. This requires either that the Ghirlanda relation has a larger scatter than previously thought, that the temporal break in X-rays is masked by some additional source of X-ray emission, or that it does not happen because of some unknown reason.
  • Thanks to the rapid position notice and response by HETE-2 and Swift, the X-ray afterglow emissions have been found for four recent short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; GRB 050509b, GRB 050709, GRB 050724, and GRB 050813). The positions of three out of four short GRBs are coincident with galaxies with no current or recent star formation. This discovery tightens the case for a different origin for short and long GRBs. On the other hand, from the prompt emission point of view, a short GRB shows a harder spectrum comparing to that of the long duration GRBs according to the BATSE observations. We investigate the prompt emission properties of four short GRBs observed by Swift/BAT. We found that the hardness of all four BAT short GRBs is in between the BATSE range for short and long GRBs. We will discuss the spectral properties of short GRBs including the short GRB sample of Konus-Wind and HETE-2 to understand the hard nature of the BATSE short GRBs.
  • We report Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) observations of the X-ray Flash (XRF) XRF 050416A. The fluence ratio between the 15-25 keV and 25-50 keV energy bands of this event is 1.5, thus making it the softest gamma-ray burst (GRB) observed by BAT so far. The spectrum is well fitted by the Band function with E^{\rm obs}_{\rm peak} of 15.0_{-2.7}^{+2.3} keV. Assuming the redshift of the host galaxy (z = 0.6535), the isotropic-equivalent radiated energy E_{\rm iso} and the peak energy at the GRB rest frame (E^{\rm src}_{\rm peak}) of XRF 050416A are not only consistent with the correlation found by Amati et al. and extended to XRFs by Sakamoto et al., but also fill-in the gap of this relation around the 30 - 80 keV range of E^{\rm src}_{\rm peak}. This result tightens the validity of the E^{\rm src}_{\rm peak} - E_{\rm iso} relation from XRFs to GRBs. We also find that the jet break time estimated using the empirical relation between E^{\rm src}_{\rm peak} and the collimation corrected energy E_{\gamma} is inconsistent with the afterglow observation by Swift X-ray Telescope. This could be due to the extra external shock emission overlaid around the jet break time or to the non existence of a jet break feature for XRF, which might be a further challenging for GRB jet emission, models and XRF/GRB unification scenarios.
  • The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) is one of 3 instruments on the Swift MIDEX spacecraft to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The BAT first detects the GRB and localizes the burst direction to an accuracy of 1-4 arcmin within 20 sec after the start of the event. The GRB trigger initiates an autonomous spacecraft slew to point the two narrow field-of-view (FOV) instruments at the burst location within 20-70 sec so to make follow-up x-ray and optical observations. The BAT is a wide-FOV, coded-aperture instrument with a CdZnTe detector plane. The detector plane is composed of 32,768 pieces of CdZnTe (4x4x2mm), and the coded-aperture mask is composed of approximately 52,000 pieces of lead (5x5x1mm) with a 1-m separation between mask and detector plane. The BAT operates over the 15-150 keV energy range with approximately 7 keV resolution, a sensitivity of approximately 10E-8 erg*cm^-2*s^-1, and a 1.4 sr (half-coded) FOV. We expect to detect >100 GRBs/yr for a 2-year mission. The BAT also performs an all-sky hard x-ray survey with a sensitivity of approximately 2 mCrab (systematic limit) and it serves as a hard x-ray transient monitor.
  • The prompt optical emission that arrives with gamma-rays from a cosmic gamma-ray burst (GRB) is a signature of the engine powering the burst, the properties of the ultra-relativistic ejecta of the explosion, and the ejecta's interactions with the surroundings. Until now, only GRB 990123 had been detected at optical wavelengths during the burst phase. Its prompt optical emission was variable and uncorrelated with the prompt gamma-ray emission, suggesting that the optical emission was generated by a reverse shock arising from the ejecta's collision with the surrounding material. Here we report prompt optical emission from GRB 041219a. It is variable and correlated with the prompt gamma-rays, indicating a common origin for the optical light and the gamma-rays. Within the context of the standard fireball model of GRBs, we attribute this new optical component to internal shocks driven into the burst ejecta by variations of the inner engine. The correlated optical emission is a direct probe of the jet isolated from the medium. The timing of the uncorrelated optical emission is strongly dependent on the nature of the medium.
  • The explosion that results in a cosmic gamma-ray burst (GRB) is thought to produce emission from two physical processes -- the activity of the central engine gives rise to the high-energy emission of the burst through internal shocking and the subsequent interaction of the flow with the external environment produces long-wavelength afterglow. While afterglow observations continue to refine our understanding of GRB progenitors and relativistic shocks, gamma-ray observations alone have not yielded a clear picture of the origin of the prompt emission nor details of the central engine. Only one concurrent visible-light transient has been found and was associated with emission from an external shock. Here we report the discovery of infrared (IR) emission contemporaneous with a GRB, beginning 7.2 minutes after the onset of GRB 041219a. Our robotic telescope acquired 21 images during the active phase of the burst, yielding the earliest multi-colour observations of any long-wavelength emission associated with a GRB. Analysis of an initial IR pulse suggests an origin consistent with internal shocks. This opens a new possibility to study the central engine of GRBs with ground-based observations at long wavelengths.
  • Magnetars comprise two classes of rotating neutron stars (Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars), whose X-ray emission is powered by an ultrastrong magnetic field, B ~ 10^15 G. Occasionally SGRs enter into active episodes producing many short X-ray bursts; extremely rarely (about once per 50 years per source), SGRs emit a giant flare, an event with total energy at least 1000 times higher than their typical bursts. Here we report that, on 2004 December 27, SGR 1806-20 emitted the brightest extra-solar transient event ever recorded, even surpassing the full moon brightness for 0.2 seconds. The total (isotropic) flare energy is 2x10^46 erg, 100 times higher than the only two previous events, making this flare a once in a century event. This colossal energy release likely occurred during a catastrophic reconfiguration of the magnetar's magnetic field. Such an event would have resembled a short, hard Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) if it had occurred within 40 Mpc, suggesting that extragalactic SGR flares may indeed form a subclass of GRBs.
  • The BAT instrument tells the Swift satellite where to point to make immediate follow-up observations of GRBs. The science software on board must efficiently process gamma-ray events coming in at up to 34 kHz, identify rate increases that could be due to GRBs while disregarding those from known sources, and produce images to accurately and rapidly locate new Gamma-ray sources.