• We demonstrate superconducting nanowire single photon detectors with 76 +/- 4 % system detection efficiency at a wavelength of 315 nm and an operating temperature of 3.2 K, with a background count rate below 1 count per second at saturated detection efficiency. We propose integrating these detectors into planar surface electrode radio-frequency Paul traps for use in trapped ion quantum information processing. We operate detectors integrated into test ion trap structures at 3.8 K both with and without typical radio-frequency trapping electric fields. The trapping fields reduce system detection efficiency by 9 %, but do not increase background count rates.
  • We report on Raman sideband cooling of ${^{25}\text{Mg}^+}$ to sympathetically cool the secular modes of motion in a $^{25}\text{Mg}^+$-$^{27}\!\text{Al}^+$ two-ion pair to near the three-dimensional (3D) ground state. The evolution of the Fock-state distribution during the cooling process is studied using a rate-equation simulation, and various heating sources that limit the efficiency of 3D sideband cooling in our system are discussed. We characterize the residual energy and heating rates of all of the secular modes of motion and estimate a secular motion time-dilation shift of ${-(1.9 \pm 0.1)\times 10^{-18}}$ for an ${^{27}\text{Al}^+}$ clock at a typical clock probe duration of $150$ ms. This is a 50-fold reduction in the secular motion time-dilation shift uncertainty in comparison with previous ${^{27}\text{Al}^+}$ clocks.
  • Electric-field noise from the surfaces of ion-trap electrodes couples to the ion's charge causing heating of the ion's motional modes. This heating limits the fidelity of quantum gates implemented in quantum information processing experiments. The exact mechanism that gives rise to electric-field noise from surfaces is not well-understood and remains an active area of research. In this work, we detail experiments intended to measure ion motional heating rates with exchangeable surfaces positioned in close proximity to the ion, as a sensor to electric-field noise. We have prepared samples with various surface conditions, characterized in situ with scanned probe microscopy and electron spectroscopy, ranging in degrees of cleanliness and structural order. The heating-rate data, however, show no significant differences between the disparate surfaces that were probed. These results suggest that the driving mechanism for electric-field noise from surfaces is due to more than just thermal excitations alone.
  • We report correlation measurements on two $^9$Be$^+$ ions that violate a chained Bell inequality obeyed by any local-realistic theory. The correlations can be modeled as derived from a mixture of a local-realistic probabilistic distribution and a distribution that violates the inequality. A statistical framework is formulated to quantify the local-realistic fraction allowable in the observed distribution without the fair-sampling or independent-and-identical-distributions assumptions. We exclude models of our experiment whose local-realistic fraction is above 0.327 at the 95 \% confidence level. This bound is significantly lower than 0.586, the minimum fraction derived from a perfect Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality experiment. Furthermore, our data provides a device-independent certification of the deterministically created Bell states.
  • We implement faster-than-adiabatic two-qubit phase gates using smooth state-dependent forces. The forces are designed to leave no final motional excitation, independently of the initial motional state in the harmonic, small-oscillations limit. They are simple, explicit functions of time and the desired logical phase of the gate, and are based on quadratic invariants of motion and Lewis-Riesenfeld phases of the normal modes.
  • We report high-fidelity laser-beam-induced quantum logic gates on magnetic-field-insensitive qubits comprised of hyperfine states in $^{9}$Be$^+$ ions with a memory coherence time of more than 1 s. We demonstrate single-qubit gates with error per gate of $3.8(1)\times 10^{-5}$. By creating a Bell state with a deterministic two-qubit gate, we deduce a gate error of $8(4)\times10^{-4}$. We characterize the errors in our implementation and discuss methods to further reduce imperfections towards values that are compatible with fault-tolerant processing at realistic overhead.
  • Entangled states are a crucial resource for quantum-based technologies such as quantum computers and quantum communication systems (1,2). Exploring new methods for entanglement generation is important for diversifying and eventually improving current approaches. Here, we create entanglement in atomic ions by applying laser fields to constrain the evolution to a restricted number of states, in an approach that has become known as "quantum Zeno dynamics" (3-5). With two trapped $^9\rm{Be}^+$ ions, we obtain Bell state fidelities up to $0.990^{+2}_{-5}$, with three ions, a W-state (6) fidelity of $0.910^{+4}_{-7}$ is obtained. Compared to other methods of producing entanglement in trapped ions, this procedure is relatively insensitive to certain imperfections such as fluctuations in laser intensity, laser frequency, and ion-motion frequencies.
  • Precision control over hybrid physical systems at the quantum level is important for the realization of many quantum-based technologies. In the field of quantum information processing (QIP) and quantum networking, various proposals discuss the possibility of hybrid architectures where specific tasks are delegated to the most suitable subsystem. For example, in quantum networks, it may be advantageous to transfer information from a subsystem that has good memory properties to another subsystem that is more efficient at transporting information between nodes in the network. For trapped-ions, a hybrid system formed of different species introduces extra degrees of freedom that can be exploited to expand and refine the control of the system. Ions of different elements have previously been used in QIP experiments for sympathetic cooling, creation of entanglement through dissipation, and quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement of one species with another. Here, we demonstrate an entangling quantum gate between ions of different elements which can serve as an important building block of QIP, quantum networking, precision spectroscopy, metrology, and quantum simulation. A geometric phase gate between a $^9$Be$^+$ ion and a $^{25}$Mg$^+$ ion is realized through an effective spin-spin interaction generated by state-dependent forces induced with laser beams. Combined with single-qubit gates and same-species entangling gates, this mixed-element entangling gate provides a complete set of gates over such a hybrid system for universal QIP. Using a sequence of such gates, we demonstrate a Controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate and a SWAP gate. We further demonstrate the robustness of these gates against thermal excitation and show improved detection in quantum logic spectroscopy (QLS). We also observe a strong violation of a CHSH-type Bell inequality on entangled states composed of different ion species.
  • We describe an ex-situ surface-cleaning procedure that is shown to reduce motional heating from ion-trap electrodes. This precleaning treatment, to be implemented immediately before the final assembly and vacuum processing of ion traps, removes surface contaminants remaining after the electrode-fabrication process. We incorporate a multi-angle ion-bombardment treatment intended to clean the electrode surfaces and interelectrode gaps of microfabricated traps. This procedure helps to minimize redeposition in the gaps between electrodes that can cause electrical shorts. We report heating rates in a stylus-type ion trap prepared in this way that are lower by one order of magnitude compared to a similar untreated stylus-type trap using the same experimental setup.
  • Entangled states are a key resource in fundamental quantum physics, quantum cryp-tography, and quantum computation [1].To date, controlled unitary interactions applied to a quantum system, so-called "quantum gates", have been the most widely used method to deterministically create entanglement [2]. These processes require high-fidelity state preparation as well as minimizing the decoherence that inevitably arises from coupling between the system and the environment and imperfect control of the system parameters. Here, on the contrary, we combine unitary processes with engineered dissipation to deterministically produce and stabilize an approximate Bell state of two trapped-ion qubits independent of their initial state. While previous works along this line involved the application of sequences of multiple time-dependent gates [3] or generated entanglement of atomic ensembles dissipatively but relied on a measurement record for steady-state entanglement [4], we implement the process in a continuous time-independent fashion, analogous to optical pumping of atomic states. By continuously driving the system towards steady-state, the entanglement is stabilized even in the presence of experimental noise and decoherence. Our demonstration of an entangled steady state of two qubits represents a step towards dissipative state engineering, dissipative quantum computation, and dissipative phase transitions [5-7]. Following this approach, engineered coupling to the environment may be applied to a broad range of experimental systems to achieve desired quantum dynamics or steady states. Indeed, concurrently with this work, an entangled steady state of two superconducting qubits was demonstrated using dissipation [8].
  • We demonstrate a trapped-ion entangling-gate scheme proposed by Bermudez et al. [Phys. Rev. A 85, 040302 (2012)]. Simultaneous excitation of a strong carrier and a single-sideband transition enables deterministic creation of entangled states. The method works for magnetic field-insensitive states, is robust against thermal excitations, includes dynamical decoupling from qubit dephasing errors, and provides simplifications in experimental implementation compared to some other entangling gates with trapped ions. We achieve a Bell state fidelity of 0.974(4) and identify the main sources of error.
  • We use electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) laser cooling to cool motional modes of a linear ion chain. As a demonstration, we apply EIT cooling on $^{24}Mg^+$ ions to cool the axial modes of a $^9Be^+$ - $^{24}Mg^+$ ion pair and a $^9Be^+$ - $^{24}Mg^+$ - $^{24}Mg^+$ - $^9Be^+$ ion chain, thereby sympathetically cooling the $^{9}$Be$^{+}$ ions. Compared to previous implementations of conventional Raman sideband cooling, we achieve approximately an order-of-magnitude reduction in the duration required to cool the modes to near the ground state and significant reduction in required laser intensity.
  • Microwave near-field quantum control of spin and motional degrees of freedom of 25Mg+ ions can be used to generate two-ion entanglement, as recently demonstrated in Ospelkaus et al. [Nature 476, 181 (2011)]. Here, we describe additional details of the setup and calibration procedures for these experiments. We discuss the design and characteristics of the surface-electrode trap and the microwave system, and compare experimental measurements of the microwave near-fields with numerical simulations. Additionally, we present a method that utilizes oscillating magnetic-field gradients to detect micromotion induced by the ponderomotive radio-frequency potential in linear traps. Finally, we discuss the present limitations of microwave-driven two-ion entangling gates in our system.
  • Individual-qubit addressing is a prerequisite for many instances of quantum information processing. We demonstrate this capability on trapped-ion qubits with microwave near-fields delivered by electrode structures integrated into a microfabricated surface-electrode trap. We describe four approaches that may be used in quantum information experiments with hyperfine levels as qubits. We implement individual control on two 25Mg+ ions separated by 4.3 micrometer and find spin-flip crosstalk errors on the order of 10^(-3).
  • As experimental platforms for quantum information processing continue to mature, characterization of the quality of unitary gates that can be applied to their quantum bits (qubits) becomes essential. Eventually, the quality must be sufficiently high to support arbitrarily long quantum computations. Randomized benchmarking already provides a platform-independent method for assessing the quality of one-qubit rotations. Here we describe an extension of this method to multi-qubit gates. We provide a platform-independent protocol for evaluating the performance of experimental Clifford unitaries, which form the basis of fault-tolerant quantum computing. We implemented the benchmarking protocol with trapped-ion two-qubit phase gates and one-qubit gates and found an error per random two-qubit Clifford unitary of $0.162 \pm 0.008$, thus setting the first benchmark for such unitaries. By implementing a second set of sequences with an extra two-qubit phase gate at each step, we extracted an error per phase gate of $0.069 \pm 0.017$. We conducted these experiments with movable, sympathetically cooled ions in a multi-zone Paul trap - a system that can in principle be scaled to larger numbers of ions.
  • We investigate the motional dynamics of single and multiple ions during transport between and separation into spatially distinct locations in a multi-zone linear Paul trap. A single 9Be+ ion in a 2 MHz harmonic well located in one zone was laser-cooled to near its ground state of motion and transported 370 micrometers by moving the well to another zone. This was accomplished in 8 microseconds, corresponding to 16 periods of oscillation. Starting from a state with n=0.1 quanta, during transport the ion was excited to a displaced coherent state with n=1.6 quanta but on completion was returned close to its motional ground state with n=0.2. Similar results were achieved for the transport of two ions. We also separated chains of up to 9 ions from one potential well to two distinct potential wells. With two ions this was accomplished in 55 microseconds, with final excitations of about 2 quanta for each ion. Fast coherent transport and separation can significantly reduce the time overhead in certain architectures for scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions.
  • With a 9Be+ trapped-ion hyperfine-states qubit, we demonstrate an error probability per randomized single-qubit gate of 2.0(2) x 10^-5, below the threshold estimate of 10^-4 commonly considered sufficient for fault-tolerant quantum computing. The 9Be+ ion is trapped above a microfabricated surface-electrode ion trap and is manipulated with microwaves applied to a trap electrode. The achievement of low single-qubit-gate errors is an essential step toward the construction of a scalable quantum computer.
  • Anomalous heating of trapped atomic ions is a major obstacle to their use as quantum bits in a scalable quantum computer. The physical origin of this heating is not fully understood, but experimental evidence suggests that it is caused by electric-field noise emanating from the surface of the trap electrodes. In this study, we have investigated the role that adsorbates on the electrodes play by identifying contaminant overlayers, developing an in situ argon-ion beam cleaning procedure, and measuring ion heating rates before and after cleaning the trap electrodes' surfaces. We find a reduction of two orders of magnitude in heating rate after cleaning.
  • We demonstrate a general method for state detection of trapped ions that can be applied to a large class of atomic and molecular species. We couple a "spectroscopy" ion (Al+) to a "control" ion (Mg+) in the same trap and perform state detection through off-resonant laser excitation of the spectroscopy ion that induces coherent motion. The motional amplitude, dependent on the spectroscopy ion state, is measured either by time-resolved photon counting, or by resolved sideband excitations on the control ion. The first method provides a simplified way to distinguish "clock" states in Al+, which avoids ground state cooling and sideband transitions. The second method reduces spontaneous emission and optical pumping on the spectroscopy ion, which we demonstrate by nondestructively distinguishing Zeeman sublevels in the 1S0 ground state of Al+.
  • The harmonic oscillator is one of the simplest physical systems but also one of the most fundamental. It is ubiquitous in nature, often serving as an approximation for a more complicated system or as a building block in larger models. Realizations of harmonic oscillators in the quantum regime include electromagnetic fields in a cavity [1-3] and the mechanical modes of a trapped atom [4] or macroscopic solid [5]. Quantized interaction between two motional modes of an individual trapped ion has been achieved by coupling through optical fields [6], and entangled motion of two ions in separate locations has been accomplished indirectly through their internal states [7]. However, direct controllable coupling between quantized mechanical oscillators held in separate locations has not been realized previously. Here we implement such coupling through the mutual Coulomb interaction of two ions held in trapping potentials separated by 40 um (similar work is reported in a related paper [8]). By tuning the confining wells into resonance, energy is exchanged between the ions at the quantum level, establishing that direct coherent motional coupling is possible for separately trapped ions. The system demonstrates a building block for quantum information processing and quantum simulation. More broadly, this work is a natural precursor to experiments in hybrid quantum systems, such as coupling a trapped ion to a quantized macroscopic mechanical or electrical oscillator [9-13].
  • Control over physical systems at the quantum level is a goal shared by scientists in fields as diverse as metrology, information processing, simulation and chemistry. For trapped atomic ions, the quantized motional and internal degrees of freedom can be coherently manipulated with laser light. Similar control is difficult to achieve with radio frequency or microwave radiation because the essential coupling between internal degrees of freedom and motion requires significant field changes over the extent of the atoms' motion. The field gradients are negligible at these frequencies for freely propagating fields; however, stronger gradients can be generated in the near-field of microwave currents in structures smaller than the free-space wavelength. In the experiments reported here, we coherently manipulate the internal quantum states of the ions on time scales of 20 ns. We also generate entanglement between the internal degrees of freedom of two atoms with a gate operation suitable for general quantum computation. We implement both operations through the magnetic fields from microwave currents in electrodes that are integrated into the micro-fabricated trap structure and create an entangled state with fidelity 76(3) %. This approach, where the quantum control mechanism is integrated into the trapping device in a scalable manner, can potentially benefit quantum information processing, simulation and spectroscopy.
  • We theoretically and experimentally examine the effects of anharmonic terms in the trapping potential for linear chains of trapped ions. We concentrate on two different effects that become significant at different levels of anharmonicity. The first is a modification of the oscillation frequencies and amplitudes of the ions' normal modes of vibration for multi-ion crystals, resulting from each ion experiencing a different curvature in the potential. In the second effect, which occurs with increased anharmonicity or higher excitation amplitude, amplitude-dependent shifts of the normal-mode frequencies become important. We evaluate normal-mode frequency and amplitude shifts, and comment on the implications for quantum information processing and quantum state engineering. Since the ratio of the anharmonic to harmonic terms typically increases as the ion--electrode distance decreases, anharmonic effects will become more significant as ion trap sizes are reduced. To avoid unwanted problems, anharmonicities should therefore be taken into account at the design stage of trap development.
  • We place two atoms in quantum superposition states and observe coherent phase evolution for 3.4x10^15 cycles. Correlation signals from the two atoms yield information about their relative phase even after the probe radiation has decohered. This technique was applied to a frequency comparison of two Al+ ions, where a fractional uncertainty of 3.7+1.0-0.8x10^-16/\sqrt{\tau/s} was observed. Two measures of the Q-factor are reported: The Q-factor derived from quantum coherence is 3.4+2.4-1.1x10^16, and the spectroscopic Q-factor for a Ramsey time of 3 s is 6.7x10^15. As part of this experiment, we demonstrate a method to detect the individual quantum states of two Al+ ions in a Mg+-Al+-Al+ linear ion chain without spatially resolving the ions.
  • Integration of fiber optics may play a critical role in the development of quantum information processors based on trapped ions and atoms by enabling scalable collection and delivery of light and coupling trapped ions to optical microcavities. We trap 24Mg+ ions in a surface-electrode Paul trap that includes an integrated optical fiber for detecting 280-nm fluorescence photons. The collection numerical aperture is 0.37 and total collection efficiency is 2.1 %. The ion can be positioned between 80 \mum and 100 \mum from the tip of the fiber by use of an adjustable rf-pseudopotential.
  • We have constructed an optical clock with a fractional frequency inaccuracy of 8.6e-18, based on quantum logic spectroscopy of an Al+ ion. A simultaneously trapped Mg+ ion serves to sympathetically laser-cool the Al+ ion and detect its quantum state. The frequency of the 1S0->3P0 clock transition is compared to that of a previously constructed Al+ optical clock with a statistical measurement uncertainty of 7.0e-18. The two clocks exhibit a relative stability of 2.8e-15/ sqrt(tau), and a fractional frequency difference of -1.8e-17, consistent with the accuracy limit of the older clock.