• Quantum networking links quantum processors through remote entanglement for distributed quantum information processing (QIP) and secure long-range communication. Trapped ions are a leading QIP platform, having demonstrated universal small-scale processors and roadmaps for large-scale implementation. Overall rates of ion-photon entanglement generation, essential for remote trapped ion entanglement, are limited by coupling efficiency into single mode fibres5 and scaling to many ions. Here we show a microfabricated trap with integrated diffractive mirrors that couples 4.1(6)% of the fluorescence from a $^{174}$Yb$^+$ ion into a single mode fibre, nearly triple the demonstrated bulk optics efficiency. The integrated optic collects 5.8(8)% of the {\pi} transition fluorescence, images the ion with sub-wavelength resolution, and couples 71(5)% of the collected light into the fibre. Our technology is suitable for entangling multiple ions in parallel and overcomes mode quality limitations of existing integrated optical interconnects. In addition, the efficiencies are sufficient for fault tolerant QIP.
  • After advent of graphene as a saturable absorber many experiments have been conducted to produce short pulse duration pulses. Here, we have measured the properties of flake-graphene saturable absorber mirrors of various flake sizes dependent on fabrication technique. These mirrors enabled us to obtain a large mode-locking bandwidth of 16nm in an erbium-doped fiber laser. Mirrors with large flake size and multi-layered thickness induce strong pulse shaping and reflect mode-locked train of pulses with very large bandwidths.
  • Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percentlevel accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferrable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much-needed benchmark for testing models of ionisation in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation.
  • This work describes the first observations of the ionisation of neon in a metastable atomic state utilising a strong-field, few-cycle light pulse. We compare the observations to theoretical predictions based on the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) theory and a solution to the time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE). The TDSE provides better agreement with the experimental data than the ADK theory. We optically pump the target atomic species and demonstrate that the ionisation rate depends on the spin state of the target atoms and provide physically transparent interpretation of such a spin dependence in the frameworks of the spin-polarised Hartree-Fock and random-phase approximations.
  • We present accurate measurements of carrier-envelope phase effects on ionisation of the noble gases with few-cycle laser pulses. The experimental apparatus is calibrated by using atomic hydrogen data to remove any systematic offsets and thereby obtain accurate CEP data on other generally used noble gases such as Ar, Kr and Xe. Experimental results for H are well supported by exact TDSE theoretical simulations however significant differences are observed in case of noble gases.
  • We study transverse electron momentum distribution (TEMD) in strong field atomic ionization driven by laser pulses with varying ellipticity. We show, both experimentally and theoretically, that the TEMD in the tunneling and over the barrier ionization regimes evolves in a qualitatively different way when the ellipticity parameter describing polarization state of the driving laser pulse increases.
  • It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates (O.I. Tolstikhin, H.J. Worner and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013) [1]). We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H2/D2 gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H2 and D2. The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.
  • When a diatomic molecule is ionized by an intense laser field, the ionization rate depends very strongly on the inter-nuclear separation. That dependence exhibits a pronounced maximum at the inter-nuclear separation known as the critical distance. This phenomenon was first demonstrated theoretically in H2+ and became known as charge-resonance enhanced ionization (CREI, in reference to a proposed physical mechanism) or simply enhanced ionisation (EI). All theoretical models of this phenomenon predict a double-peak structure in the R-dependent ionization rate of H2+. However, such double-peak structure has never been observed experimentally. It was even suggested that it is impossible to observe due to fast motion of the nuclear wavepackets. Here we report a few-cycle pump-probe experiment which clearly resolves that elusive double-peak structure. In the experiment, an expanding H2+ ion produced by an intense pump pulse is probed by a much weaker probe pulse. The predicted double-peak structure is clearly seen in delay-dependent kinetic energy spectra of protons when pump and probe pulses are polarized parallel to each other. No structure is seen when the probe is polarized perpendicular to the pump.
  • Driven dissipative steady state entanglement schemes take advantage of coupling to the environment to robustly prepare highly entangled states. We present a scheme for two trapped ions to generate a maximally entangled steady state with fidelity above 0.99, appropriate for use in quantum protocols. Furthermore, we extend the scheme by introducing detection of our dissipation process, significantly enhancing the fidelity. Our scheme is robust to anomalous heating and requires no sympathetic cooling.
  • As the simplest atomic system, the hydrogen atom plays a key benchmarking role in laser and quantum physics. Atomic hydrogen is a widely used atomic test system for theoretical calculations of strong-field ionization, since approximate theories can be directly compared to numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation. However, relatively little experimental data is available for comparison to these calculations, since atomic hydrogen sources are difficult to construct and use. We review the existing experimental results on strong-field ionization of atomic hydrogen in multi-cycle and few-cycle laser pulses. Quantitative agreement has been achieved between experiment and theoretical predictions at the 10% uncertainty level, and has been used to develop an intensity calibration method with 1% uncertainty. Such quantitative agreement can be used to certify experimental techniques as being free from systematic errors, guaranteeing the accuracy of data obtained on species other than H. We review the experimental and theoretical techniques that enable these results.
  • We demonstrate three-photon excitation in quantum dots with a mode-locked fiber laser operating in the telecommunications band. We compare spectra and intensity dependence of fluorescence from one- and three-photon excitation of commercially available 640 nm quantum dots, using a 372 nm diode laser for one-photon excitation and 116 fs pulses from a mode-locked fiber laser with a center wavelength of 1575 nm for three-photon excitation.
  • We present a fast phase gate scheme that is experimentally achievable and has an operation time more than two orders of magnitude faster than current experimental schemes for low numbers of pulses. The gate time improves with the number of pulses following an inverse power law. Unlike implemented schemes which excite precise motional sidebands, thus limiting the gate timescale, our scheme excites multiple motional states using discrete ultra-fast pulses. We use beam-splitters to divide pulses into smaller components to overcome limitations due to the finite laser pulse repetition rate. This provides gate times faster than proposed theoretical schemes when we optimise a practical setup.
  • A common objective for quantum control is to force a quantum system, initially in an unknown state, into a particular target subspace. We show that if the subspace is required to be a decoherence-free subspace of dimension greater than 1, then such control must be decoherent. That is, it will take almost any pure state to a mixed state. We make no assumptions about the control mechanism, but our result implies that for this purpose coherent control offers no advantage, in principle, over the obvious measurement-based feedback protocol.
  • Fundamental optics such as lenses and prisms work by applying phase shifts to incoming light via the refractive index. In these macroscopic devices, many particles each contribute a miniscule phase shift, working together to impose a total phase shift of many radians. In principle, even a single isolated particle can apply a radian-level phase shift, but observing this phenomenon has proven challenging. We have used a single trapped atomic ion to induce and measure a large optical phase shift of $1.3 \pm 0.1$ radians in light scattered by the atom. Spatial interferometry between the scattered light and unscattered illumination light enables us to isolate the phase shift in the scattered component. The phase shift achieves the maximum value allowed by atomic theory over the accessible range of laser frequencies, validating the microscopic model that underpins the macroscopic phenomenon of the refractive index. Single-atom phase shifts of this magnitude open up new quantum information protocols, including long-range quantum phase-shift-keying cryptography [1,2] and quantum nondemolition measurement [3,4].
  • Absorption imaging has played a key role in the advancement of science from van Leeuwenhoek's discovery of red blood cells to modern observations of dust clouds in stellar nebulas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Here we show the first absorption imaging of a single atom isolated in vacuum. The optical properties of atoms are thoroughly understood, so a single atom is an ideal system for testing the limits of absorption imaging. A single atomic ion was confined in an RF Paul trap and the absorption imaged at near wavelength resolution with a phase Fresnel lens. The observed image contrast of 3.1(3)% is the maximum theoretically allowed for the imaging resolution of our setup. The absorption of photons by single atoms is of immediate interest for quantum information processing (QIP). Our results also point out new opportunities in imaging of light-sensitive samples both in the optical and x-ray regimes.
  • We show how to bridge the divide between atomic systems and electronic devices by engineering a coupling between the motion of a single ion and the quantized electric field of a resonant circuit. Our method can be used to couple the internal state of an ion to the quantized circuit with the same speed as the internal-state coupling between two ions. All the well-known quantum information protocols linking ion internal and motional states can be converted to protocols between circuit photons and ion internal states. Our results enable quantum interfaces between solid state qubits, atomic qubits, and light, and lay the groundwork for a direct quantum connection between electrical and atomic metrology standards.
  • We have used injection locking to multiply the repetition rate of a passively mode-locked femtosecond fiber laser from 40 MHz to 1 GHz while preserving optical phase coherence between the master laser and the slave output. The system is implemented almost completely in fiber and incorporates gain and passive saturable absorption. The slave repetition rate is set to a rational harmonic of the master repetition rate, inducing pulse formation at the least common multiple of the master and slave repetition rates.
  • Saturable absorbers are a key component for mode-locking femtosecond lasers. Polymer films containing graphene flakes have recently been used in transmission as laser mode-lockers, but suffer from high nonsaturable loss, limiting their application in low-gain lasers. Here we present a saturable absorber mirror based on a film of pure graphene flakes. The device is used to mode lock an erbium-doped fiber laser, generating pulses with state-of-the-art, sub-200-fs duration. The laser characteristic indicate that the film exhibits low nonsaturable loss (13% per pass) and large absorption modulation depth (45% of low-power absorption).
  • We present the first experimental data on strong-field ionization of atomic hydrogen by few-cycle laser pulses. We obtain quantitative agreement at the 10% level between the data and an {\it ab initio} simulation over a wide range of laser intensities and electron energies.
  • The metastable ^{2}F_{7/2} and ^{2}D_{3/2} states of Yb^{+} are of interest for applications in metrology and quantum information and also act as dark states in laser cooling. These metastable states are commonly repumped to the ground state via the 638.6 nm ^{2}F_{7/2} -- ^{1}D[5/2]_{5/2} and 935.2 nm ^{2}D_{3/2} -- ^{3}D[3/2]_{1/2} transitions. We have performed optogalvanic spectroscopy of these transitions in Yb^{+} ions generated in a discharge. We measure the pressure broadening coefficient for the 638.6 nm transition to be 70 \pm 10 MHz mbar^{-1}. We place an upper bound of 375 MHz/nucleon on the 638.6 nm isotope splitting and show that our observations are consistent with theory for the hyperfine splitting. Our measurements of the 935.2 nm transition extend those made by Sugiyama et al, showing well-resolved isotope and hyperfine splitting. We obtain high signal to noise, sufficient for laser stabilisation applications.
  • We demonstrate millikelvin thermometry of laser cooled trapped ions with high-resolution imaging. This equilibrium approach is independent of the cooling dynamics and has lower systematic error than Doppler thermometry, with \pm5 mK accuracy and \pm1 mK precision. We used it to observe highly anisotropic dynamics of a single ion, finding temperatures of < 60 mK and > 15 K simultaneously along different directions. This thermometry technique can offer new insights into quantum systems sympathetically cooled by ions, including atoms, molecules, nanomechanical oscillators, and electric circuits.
  • A microfabricated phase Fresnel lens was used to image ytterbium ions trapped in a radio frequency Paul trap. The ions were laser cooled close to the Doppler limit on the 369.5 nm transition, reducing the ion motion so that each ion formed a near point source. By detecting the ion fluorescence on the same transition, near diffraction limited imaging with spot sizes of below 440 nm (FWHM) was achieved. This is the first demonstration of imaging trapped ions with a resolution on the order of the transition wavelength.
  • We generate mode-locked picosecond pulses near 1110 nm by spectrally slicing and reamplifying an octave-spanning supercontinuum source pumped at 1550 nm. The 1110 nm pulses are near transform-limited, with 1.7 ps duration over their 1.2 nm bandwidth, and exhibit high interpulse coherence. Both the supercontinuum source and the pulse synthesis system are implemented completely in fiber. The versatile source construction suggests that pulse synthesis from sliced supercontinuum may be a useful technique across the 1000 - 2000 nm wavelength range.
  • We stabilize an ultraviolet diode laser system at 369.5 nm to the optical absorption signal from Yb+ ions in a hollow-cathode discharge lamp. The error signal for stabilization is obtained by Zeeman spectroscopy of the 3 GHz-wide absorption feature. The frequency stability is independently measured by comparison against the fluorescence signal from a laser-cooled crystal of 174Yb+ ions in a linear Paul trap. We measure a frequency fluctuation of 1.7 MHz RMS over 1000 s, and a frequency drift of 20 MHz over 7 days. Our method is suitable for use in quantum information processing experiments with trapped ion crystals.
  • Atomic ions trapped in ultra-high vacuum form an especially well-understood and useful physical system for quantum information processing. They provide excellent shielding of quantum information from environmental noise, while strong, well-controlled laser interactions readily provide quantum logic gates. A number of basic quantum information protocols have been demonstrated with trapped ions. Much current work aims at the construction of large-scale ion-trap quantum computers using complex microfabricated trap arrays. Several groups are also actively pursuing quantum interfacing of trapped ions with photons.