• Van der Waals heterostructures (VDWHs) exhibit rich properties and thus has potential for applications, and charge transfer between different layers in a heterostructure often dominates its properties and device performance. It is thus critical to reveal and understand the charge transfer effects in VDWHs, for which electronic structure measurements have proven to be effective. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we studied the electronic structures of (PbSe)1.16(TiSe2)m(m=1, 2), which are naturally occurring VDWHs, and discovered several striking charge transfer effects. When the thickness of the TiSe2 layers is halved from m=2 to m=1, the amount of charge transferred increases unexpectedly by more than 250%. This is accompanied by a dramatic drop in the electron-phonon interaction strength far beyond the prediction by first-principles calculations and, consequently, superconductivity only exists in the m=2 compound with strong electron-phonon interaction, albeit with lower carrier density. Furthermore, we found that the amount of charge transferred in both compounds is nearly halved when warmed from below 10 K to room temperature, due to the different thermal expansion coefficients of the constituent layers of these misfit compounds. These unprecedentedly large charge transfer effects might widely exist in VDWHs composed of metal-semiconductor contacts; thus, our results provide important insights for further understanding and applications of VDWHs.
  • Bismuthates were the first family of oxide high-temperature superconductors, exhibiting superconducting transition temperatures (Tc) up to 32K, but the superconducting mechanism remains under debate despite more than 30 years of extensive research. Our angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies on Ba$_{0.51}$K$_{0.49}$BiO$_3$ reveal an unexpectedly 34% larger bandwidth than in conventional density functional theory calculations. This can be reproduced by calculations that fully account for long-range Coulomb interactions --- the first direct demonstration of bandwidth expansion due to the Fock exchange term, a long-accepted and yet uncorroborated fundamental effect in many body physics. Furthermore, we observe an isotropic superconducting gap with 2\Delta$_0$/k$_B$ T$_c$ = 3.51 $\pm$ 0.05, and strong electron-phonon interactions with a coupling constant \lambda$\sim$ 1.3 $\pm$ 0.2. These findings solve a long-standing mystery --- Ba$_{0.51}$K$_{0.49}$BiO$_3$ is an extraordinary Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superconductor, where long-range Coulomb interactions expand the bandwidth, enhance electron-phonon coupling, and generate the high Tc. Such effects will also be critical for finding new superconductors.
  • Crystal electric field states in rare earth intermetallics show an intricate entanglement with the many-body physics that occurs in these systems and that is known to lead to a plethora of electronic phases. Here, we attempt to trace different contributions to the crystal electric field (CEF) splittings in CeIrIn$_5$, a heavy-fermion compound and member of the Ce$M$In$_5$ ($M$= Co, Rh, Ir) family. To this end, we utilize high-resolution resonant angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and present a spectroscopic study of the electronic structure of this unconventional superconductor over a wide temperature range. As a result, we show how ARPES can be used in combination with thermodynamic measurements or neutron scattering to disentangle different contributions to the CEF splitting in rare earth intermetallics. We also find that the hybridization is stronger in CeIrIn$_5$ than CeCoIn$_5$ and the effects of the hybridization on the Fermi volume increase is much smaller than predicted. By providing the first experimental evidence for $4f_{7/2}^{1}$ splittings which, in CeIrIn$_5$, split the octet into four doublets, we clearly demonstrate the many-body origin of the so-called $4f_{7/2}^{1}$ state.
  • A key issue in heavy fermion research is how subtle changes in the hybridization between the 4$f$ (5$f$) and conduction electrons can result in fundamentally different ground states. CeRhIn$_5$ stands out as a particularly notable example: replacing Rh by either Co or Ir, located above or below Rh in the periodic table, antiferromagnetism gives way to superconductivity. In this photoemission study of CeRhIn$_5$, we demonstrate that the use of resonant ARPES with polarized light allows to extract detailed information on the 4$f$ crystal field states and details on the 4$f$ and conduction electron hybridization which together determine the ground state. We directly observe weakly dispersive Kondo resonances of $f$-electrons and identify two of the three Ce $4f_{5/2}^{1}$ crystal-electric-field levels and band-dependent hybridization, which signals that the hybridization occurs primarily between the Ce $4f$ states in the CeIn$_3$ layer and two more three-dimensional bands composed of the Rh $4d$ and In $5p$ orbitals in the RhIn$_2$ layer. Our results allow to connect the properties observed at elevated temperatures with the unusual low-temperature properties of this enigmatic heavy fermion compound.
  • Bulk FeSe is superconducting with a critical temperature $T_c$ $\cong$ 8 K and SrTiO$_3$ is insulating in nature, yet high-temperature superconductivity has been reported at the interface between a single-layer FeSe and SrTiO$_3$. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements observe a gap opening at the Fermi surface below $\approx$ 60 K. Elucidating the microscopic properties and understanding the pairing mechanism of single-layer FeSe is of utmost importance as it is a basic building block of iron-based superconductors. Here, we use the low-energy muon spin rotation/relaxation technique (LE-$\mu$SR) to detect and quantify the supercarrier density and determine the gap symmetry in FeSe grown on SrTiO$_3$ (100). Measurements in applied field show a temperature dependent broadening of the field distribution below $\sim$ 60 K, reflecting the superconducting transition and formation of a vortex state. Zero field measurements rule out the presence of magnetism of static or fluctuating origin. From the inhomogeneous field distribution, we determine an effective sheet supercarrier density $n_s^{2D} \simeq 6 \times 10^{14}$ cm$^{-2}$ at $T \rightarrow 0$ K, which is a factor of 4 larger than expected from ARPES measurements of the excess electron count per Fe of 1 monolayer (ML) FeSe. The temperature dependence of the superfluid density $n_s(T)$ can be well described down to $\sim$ 10 K by simple s-wave BCS, indicating a rather clean superconducting phase with a gap of 10.2(1.1) meV. The result is a clear indication of the gradual formation of a two dimensional vortex lattice existing over the entire large FeSe/STO interface and provides unambiguous evidence for robust superconductivity below 60 K in ultrathin FeSe.
  • The dream of room temperature superconductors has inspired intense research effort to find routes for enhancing the superconducting transition temperature (Tc). Therefore, single-layer FeSe on a SrTiO3 substrate, with its extraordinarily high Tc amongst all interfacial superconductors and iron based superconductors, is particularly interesting, but the mechanism underlying its high Tc has remained mysterious. Here we show through isotope effects that electrons in FeSe couple with the oxygen phonons in the substrate, and the superconductivity is enhanced linearly with the coupling strength atop the intrinsic superconductivity of heavily-electron-doped FeSe. Our observations solve the enigma of FeSe/SrTiO3, and experimentally establish the critical role and unique behavior of electron-phonon forward scattering in a correlated high-Tc superconductor. The effective cooperation between interlayer electron-phonon interactions and correlations suggests a path forward in developing more high-Tc interfacial superconductors, and may shed light on understanding the high Tc of bulk high temperature superconductors with layered structures.
  • In the iron-based superconductors, understanding the relation between superconductivity and electronic structure upon doping is crucial for exploring the pairing mechanism. Recently it was found that in iron selenide (FeSe), enhanced superconductivity (Tc over 40K) can be achieved via electron doping, with the Fermi surface only comprising M-centered electron pockets. Here by utilizing surface potassium dosing, scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we studied the electronic structure and superconductivity of (Li0.8Fe0.2OH)FeSe in the deep electron-doped regime. We find that a {\Gamma}-centered electron band, which originally lies above the Fermi level (EF), can be continuously tuned to cross EF and contribute a new electron pocket at {\Gamma}. When this Lifshitz transition occurs, the superconductivity in the M-centered electron pocket is slightly suppressed; while a possible superconducting gap with small size (up to ~5 meV) and a dome-like doping dependence is observed on the new {\Gamma} electron pocket. Upon further K dosing, the system eventually evolves into an insulating state. Our findings provide new clues to understand superconductivity versus Fermi surface topology and the correlation effect in FeSe-based superconductors.
  • Hexagonal FeSe thin films were grown on SrTiO3 substrates and the temperature and thickness dependence of their electronic structures were studied. The hexagonal FeSe is found to be metallic and electron doped, whose Fermi surface consists of six elliptical electron pockets. With decreased temperature, parts of the bands shift downward to high binding energy while some bands shift upwards to EF. The shifts of these bands begin around 300 K and saturate at low temperature, indicating a magnetic phase transition temperature of about 300 K. With increased film thickness, the Fermi surface topology and band structure show no obvious change except some minor quantum size effect. Our paper reports the first electronic structure of hexagonal FeSe, and shows that the possible magnetic transition is driven by large scale electronic structure reconstruction.
  • Recently, superconductivity in potassium (K) doped p-terphenyl (C18H14) has been suggested by the possible observation of the Meissner effect and subsequent photoemission spectroscopy measurements, but the detailed lattice structure and more-direct evidence are still lacking. Here we report a low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) study on K-doped single layer p-terphenyl films grown on Au (111). We observe several ordered phases with different morphologies and electronic behaviors, in two of which a sharp and symmetric low-energy gap of about 11 meV opens below 50 K. In particular, the gap shows no obvious response to a magnetic field up to 11 Tesla, which would caution against superconductivity as an interpretation in previous reports of K-doped p-terphenyl materials. Such gapped phases are rarely (if ever) observed in single layer hydrocarbon molecular crystals. Our work also paves the way for fabricating doped two-dimensional (2D) hydrocarbon materials, which will provide a platform to search for novel emergent phenomena.
  • Here we report the electronic structure of FeS, a recently identified iron-based superconductor. Our high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies show two hole-like ($\alpha$ and $\beta$) and two electron-like ($\eta$ and $\delta$) Fermi pockets around the Brillouin zone center and corner, respectively, all of which exhibit moderate dispersion along $k_z$. However, a third hole-like band ($\gamma$) is not observed, which is expected around the zone center from band calculations and is common in iron-based superconductors. Since this band has the highest renormalization factor and is known to be the most vulnerable to defects, its absence in our data is likely due to defect scattering --- and yet superconductivity can exist without coherent quasiparticles in the $\gamma$ band. This may help resolve the current controversy on the superconducting gap structure of FeS. Moreover, by comparing the $\beta$ bandwidths of various iron chalcogenides, including FeS, FeSe$_{1-x}$S$_x$, FeSe, and FeSe$_{1-x}$ Te$_x$, we find that the $\beta$ bandwidth of FeS is the broadest. However, the band renormalization factor of FeS is still quite large, when compared with the band calculations, which indicates sizable electron correlations. This explains why the unconventional superconductivity can persist over such a broad range of isovalent substitution in FeSe$_{1-x}$Te$_{x}$ and FeSe$_{1-x}$S$_{x}$.
  • Pairing in the cuprate high-temperature superconductors and its origin remain among the most enduring mysteries in condensed matter physics. With cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy/ spectroscopy, we clearly reveal the spatial-dependence or inhomogeneity of the superconducting gap structure of Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$ (Bi2212) and YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-x}$ (YBCO) along their $c$-axes on a scale shorter than the interlayer spacing. By tunneling into the (100) plane of a Bi2212 single crystal and a YBCO film, we observe both U-shaped tunneling spectra with extended flat zero-conductance bottoms, and V-shaped gap structures, in different regions of each sample. On the YBCO film, tunneling into a (110) surface only reveals a U-shaped gap without any zero-bias peak. Our analysis suggests that the U-shaped gap is likely a nodeless superconducting gap. The V-shaped gap has a very small amplitude, and is likely proximity-induced by regions having the larger U-shaped gap.
  • Extremely high magnetoresistance (XMR) in the lanthanum monopnictides La$X$ ($X$ = Sb, Bi) has recently attracted interest in these compounds as candidate topological materials. However, their perfect electron-hole compensation provides an alternative explanation, so the possible role of topological surface states requires verification through direct observation. Our angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data reveal multiple Dirac-like surface states near the Fermi level in both materials. Intriguingly, we have observed circular dichroism in both surface and near-surface bulk bands. Thus the spin-orbit coupling-induced orbital and spin angular momentum textures may provide a mechanism to forbid backscattering in zero field, suggesting that surface and near-surface bulk bands may contribute strongly to XMR in La$X$. The extremely simple rock salt structure of these materials and the ease with which high-quality crystals can be prepared suggests that they may be an ideal platform for further investigation of topological matter.
  • Heavy fermion materials gain high electronic masses and expand Fermi surfaces when the high-temperature localized f electrons become itinerant and hybridize with the conduction band at low temperatures. However, despite the common application of this model, direct microscopic verification remains lacking. Here we report high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements on CeCoIn5, a prototypical heavy fermion compound, and reveal the long-sought band hybridization and Fermi surface expansion. Unexpectedly, the localized-to-itinerant transition occurs at surprisingly high temperatures, yet f electrons are still largely localized at the lowest temperature. Moreover, crystal field excitations likely play an important role in the anomalous temperature dependence. Our results paint an comprehensive unanticipated experimental picture of the heavy fermion formation in a periodic multi-level Anderson/Kondo lattice, and set the stage for understanding the emergent properties in related materials.
  • (Li0.8Fe0.2)OHFeSe is a newly-discovered intercalated iron-selenide superconductor with a Tc above 40 K, which is much higher than the Tc of bulk FeSe (8 K). Here we report a systematic study of (Li0.8Fe0.2)OHFeSe by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We observed two kinds of surface terminations, namely FeSe and (Li0.8Fe0.2)OH surfaces. On the FeSe surface, the superconducting state is fully gapped with double coherence peaks, and a vortex core state with split peaks near EF is observed. Through quasi-particle interference (QPI) measurements, we clearly observed intra- and inter-pocket scatterings in between the electron pockets at the M point, as well as some evidence of scattering that connects gamma and M points. Upon applying magnetic field, the QPI intensity of all the scattering channels are found to behave similarly. Furthermore, we studied impurity effects on the superconductivity by investigating intentionally introduced impurities and intrinsic defects. We observed that magnetic impurities such as Cr adatoms can induce in-gap states and suppress superconductivity. However, nonmagnetic impurities such as Zn adatoms do not induce visible in-gap states. Meanwhile, we show that Zn adatoms can induce in-gap states in thick FeSe films, which is believed to have an (s+-)wave pairing symmetry. Our experimental results suggest it is likely that (Li0.8Fe0.2)OHFeSe is a plain s-wave superconductor, whose order parameter has the same sign on all Fermi surface sections.
  • In iron-based superconductors, a spin-density-wave (SDW) magnetic order is suppressed with doping and unconventional superconductivity appears in close proximity to the SDW instability. The optical response of the SDW order shows clear gap features: substantial suppression in the low-frequency optical conductivity, alongside a spectral weight transfer from low to high frequencies. Here, we study the detailed temperature dependence of the optical response in three different series of the Ba122 system [Ba$_{1-x}$K$_{x}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$, Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$)$_{2}$As$_{2}$ and BaFe$_{2}$(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$]. Intriguingly, we found that the suppression of the low-frequency optical conductivity and spectral weight transfer appear at a temperature $T^{\ast}$ much higher than the SDW transition temperature $T_{SDW}$. Since this behavior has the same optical feature and energy scale as the SDW order, we attribute it to SDW fluctuations. Furthermore, $T^{\ast}$ is suppressed with doping, closely following the doping dependence of the nematic fluctuations detected by other techniques. These results suggest that the magnetic and nematic orders have an intimate relationship, in favor of the magnetic-fluctuation-driven nematicity scenario in iron-based superconductors.
  • PtBi2 with a layered trigonal crystal structure was recently reported to exhibit an unconventional large linear magnetoresistance, while the mechanism involved is still elusive. Using high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we present a systematic study on its bulk and surface electronic structure. Through careful comparison with first-principle calculations, our experiment distinguishes the low-lying bulk bands from entangled surface states, allowing the estimation of the real stoichiometry of samples. We find significant electron doping in PtBi2, implying a substantial Bi deficiency induced disorder therein. We discover a Dirac-cone-like surface state on the boundary of the Brillouin zone, which is identified as an accidental Dirac band without topological protection. Our findings exclude quantum-limit-induced linear band dispersion as the cause of the unconventional large linear magnetoresistance.
  • Iron chalcogenide superconductors are multi-band systems with strong electron correlations. Here we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study band dependent correlation effects in single-layer FeSe/Nb:BaTiO3/KTaO3, a new iron chalcogenide superconductor with non-degenerate electron pockets and interface-enhanced superconductivity. The non-degeneracy of the electron bands helps to resolve the temperature dependent evolution of different bands. With increasing temperature, the single layer FeSe undergoes a band-selective localization, in which the coherent spectral weight of one electron band is completely depleted while that of the other one remains finite. In addition, the spectral weight of the incoherent background is enhanced with increasing temperature, indicating a coherent-incoherent crossover. Signatures of polaronic behavior are observed, suggesting electron-boson interactions. These phenomena help to construct a more complete picture of electron correlations in the FeSe family.
  • FeSe exhibits a novel ground state in which superconductivity coexists with a nematic order in the absence of any long-range magnetic order. Here we report an angle-resolved photoemission study on the superconducting gap structure in the nematic state of FeSe$_{0.93}$S$_{0.07}$, without the complication caused by Fermi surface reconstruction induced by magnetic order. We found that the superconducting gap shows a pronounced 2-fold anisotropy around the elliptical hole pocket near the Z point of the Brillouin zone, with gap minima at the endpoints of its major axis, while no detectable gap was observed around the zone center and zone corner. The large anisotropy and nodal gap distribution demonstrate the substantial effects of the nematicity on the superconductivity, and thus put strong constraints on the current theories.
  • The 122$^{*}$ series of iron-chalcogenide superconductors, for example K$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_{2}$, only possesses electron Fermi pockets. Their distinctive electronic structure challenges the picture built upon iron pnictide superconductors, where both electron and hole Fermi pockets coexist. However, partly due to the intrinsic phase separation in this family of compounds, many aspects of their behavior remain elusive. In particular, the evolution of the 122$^{*}$ series of iron-chalcogenides with chemical substitution still lacks a microscopic and unified interpretation. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we studied a major fraction of 122$^{*}$ iron-chalcogenides, including the isovalently `doped' K$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_{2-z}$S$_z$, Rb$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_{2-z}$Te$_z$ and (Tl,K)$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_{2-z}$S$_z$. We found that the bandwidths of the low energy Fe \textit{3d} bands in these materials depend on doping; and more crucially, as the bandwidth decreases, the ground state evolves from a metal to a superconductor, and eventually to an insulator, yet the Fermi surface in the metallic phases is unaffected by the isovalent dopants. Moreover, the correlation-driven insulator found here with small band filling may be a novel insulating phase. Our study shows that almost all the known 122$^{*}$-series iron chalcogenides can be understood {\it via} one unifying phase diagram which implies that moderate correlation strength is beneficial for the superconductivity.
  • Various Fe-vacancy orders have been reported in tetragonal Fe1-xSe single crystals and nanowires/nanosheets, which are similar to those found in alkali metal intercalated A1-xFe2-ySe2 superconductors. Here we report the in-situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of Fe-vacancy disordered and ordered phases in FeSe multi-layer thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Low temperature annealed FeSe films are identified to be Fe-vacancy disordered phase and electron doped. Further long-time low temperature anneal can change the Fe-vacancy disordered phase to ordered phase, which is found to be semiconductor/insulator with (root 5) x (root 5) superstructure and can be reversely changed to disordered phase with high temperature anneal. Our results reveal that the disorder-order transition in FeSe thin films can be simply tuned by vacuum anneal and the (root 5) x (root 5) Fe-vacancy ordered phase is more likely the parent phase of FeSe.
  • We report the surface electronic structure of niobium phosphide NbP single crystal on (001) surface by vacuum ultraviolet angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Combining with our first principle calculations, we identify the existence of the Fermi arcs originated from topological surface states. Furthermore, the surface states exhibit circular dichroism pattern, which may correlate with its non-trivial spin texture. Our results provide critical evidence for the existence of the Weyl Fermions in NbP, which lays the foundation for further investigations.
  • The electronic structure of FeSe thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrate is studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We reveal the existence of Dirac cone band dispersions in FeSe thin films thicker than 1 Unit Cell below the nematic transition temperature, whose apex are located -10 meV below Fermi energy. The evolution of Dirac cone electronic structure for FeSe thin films as function of temperature, thickness and cobalt doping is systematically studied. The Dirac cones are found to be coexisted with the nematicity in FeSe, disappear when nematicity is suppressed. Our results provide some indication that the spin degrees of freedom may play some kind of role in the nematicity of FeSe.
  • In FeSe-derived superconductors, the lack of a systematic and clean control on the carrier concentration prevents the comprehensive understanding on the phase diagram and the interplay between different phases. Here by K dosing and angle resolved photoemission study on thick FeSe films and FeSe$_{0.93}$S$_{0.07}$ bulk crystals, the phase diagram of FeSe as a function of electron doping is established, which is extraordinarily different from other Fe-based superconductors. The correlation strength remarkably increases with increasing doping, while an insulting phase emerges in the heavily overdoped regime. Between the nematic phase and the insulating phase, a dome of enhanced superconductivity is observed, with the maximum superconducting transition temperature of 44$\pm$2~K. The enhanced superconductivity is independent of the thickness of FeSe, indicating that it is intrinsic to FeSe. Our findings provide an ideal system with variable doping for understanding the different phases and rich physics in the FeSe family.
  • Temperature and fluence dependence of the 1.55-eV optical transient reflectivity in BaFe$_{2}$(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$ was measured and analysed in the low and high excitation density limit. The effective magnitude of the superconducting gap of $\sim 5$ meV obtained from the low-fluence-data bottleneck model fit is consistent with the ARPES results for the $\gamma$-hole Fermi surface. The superconducting-state nonthermal optical destruction energy was determined from the fluence dependent data. The in-plane optical destruction energy scales well with T$_{\mathrm{c}}^{2}$ and is found to be similar in a number of different layered superconductors.
  • Sr2IrO4 was predicted to be a high temperature superconductor upon electron doping since it highly resembles the cuprates in crystal structure, electronic structure and magnetic coupling constants. Here we report a scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) study of Sr2IrO4 with surface electron doping by depositing potassium (K) atoms. At the 0.5-0.7 monolayer (ML) K coverage, we observed a sharp, V-shaped gap with about 95% loss of density of state (DOS) at EFand visible coherence peaks. The gap magnitude is 25-30 meV for 0.5-0.6 ML K coverage and it closes around 50 K. These behaviors exhibit clear signature of superconductivity. Furthermore, we found that with increased electron doping, the system gradually evolves from an insulating state to a normal metallic state, via a pseudogap-like state and possible superconducting state. Our data suggest possible high temperature superconductivity in electron doped Sr2IrO4, and its remarkable analogy to the cuprates.