• The mass of the stellar precursor of supernova (SN) 1987A and the burst of neutrinos observed at the moment of the explosion are consistent with the core-collapse formation of a neutron star. However, no compelling evidence for the presence in SN 1987A of a compact object of any kind has been found yet in any band of the electromagnetic spectrum, prompting questions on whether the neutron star survived and, if it did, on its properties. Starting from the analysis of recent Chandra observations, here we appraise the current observational situation. We derived limits on the X-ray luminosity of a compact object with a nonthermal, Crab-pulsar-like spectrum of the order of $\approx$$(1$-$5)\times10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$, corresponding to limits on the rotational energy loss of a possible X-ray pulsar in SN 1987A of $\approx$$(0.5$-$1.5)\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$. However, a much brighter X-ray source cannot be excluded if, as is likely, it is enshrouded in a cloud of absorbing matter with metallicity similar to that expected in the outer layers of a massive star towards the end of its life. We found that other limits obtained from various arguments and observations in other energy ranges either are unbinding or allow a similar maximum luminosity of the order of $\approx$$10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$. We conclude that while a pulsar alike the one in the Crab Nebula in both luminosity and spectrum is hardly compatible with the observations, there is ample space for an `ordinary' X-ray-emitting young neutron star, born with normal initial spin period, temperature and magnetic field, to be hiding inside the evolving remnant of SN 1987A.
  • A peculiar infrared ring-like structure was discovered by {\em Spitzer} around the strongly magnetised neutron star SGR 1900$+$14. This infrared structure was suggested to be due to a dust-free cavity, produced by the SGR Giant Flare occurred in 1998, and kept illuminated by surrounding stars. Using a 3D dust radiative transfer code, we aimed at reproducing the emission morphology and the integrated emission flux of this structure assuming different spatial distributions and densities for the dust, and different positions for the illuminating stars. We found that a dust-free ellipsoidal cavity can reproduce the shape, flux, and spectrum of the ring-like infrared emission, provided that the illuminating stars are inside the cavity and that the interstellar medium has high gas density ($n_H\sim$1000 cm$^{-3}$). We further constrain the emitting region to have a sharp inner boundary and to be significantly extended in the radial direction, possibly even just a cavity in a smooth molecular cloud. We discuss possible scenarios for the formation of the dustless cavity and the particular geometry that allows it to be IR-bright.
  • In this paper, we report on the available X-ray data collected by INTEGRAL, Swift, and XMM-Newton during the first outburst of the INTEGRAL transient IGR J17451-3022, discovered in 2014 August. The monitoring observations provided by the JEM-X instruments on-board INTEGRAL and the Swift/XRT showed that the event lasted for about 9 months and that the emission of the source remained soft for the entire period. The source emission is dominated by a thermal component (kT~1.2 keV), most likely produced by an accretion disk. The XMM-Newton observation carried out during the outburst revealed the presence of multiple absorption features in the soft X-ray emission that could be associated to the presence of an ionized absorber lying above the accretion disk, as observed in many high-inclination low mass X-ray binaries. The XMM-Newton data also revealed the presence of partial and rectangular X-ray eclipses (lasting about 820 s), together with dips. The latter can be associated with increases in the overall absorption column density in the direction of the source. The detection of two consecutive X-ray eclipses in the XMM-Newton data allowed us to estimate the source orbital period at 22620.5(-1.8,+2.0) s (1{\sigma} c.l.).
  • We study the late-time (t>0.5 days) X-ray afterglows of nearby (z<0.5) long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) with Swift and identify a population of explosions with slowly decaying, super-soft (photon index Gamma_x>3) X-ray emission that is inconsistent with forward shock synchrotron radiation associated with the afterglow. These explosions also show larger-than-average intrinsic absorption (NH_x,i >6d21 cm-2) and prompt gamma-ray emission with extremely long duration (T_90>1000 s). Chance association of these three rare properties (i.e. large NH_x,i, super-soft Gamma_x and extreme duration) in the same class of explosions is statistically unlikely. We associate these properties with the turbulent mass-loss history of the progenitor star that enriched and shaped the circum-burst medium. We identify a natural connection between NH_x,i Gamma_x and T_90 in these sources by suggesting that the late-time super-soft X-rays originate from radiation reprocessed by material lost to the environment by the stellar progenitor before exploding, (either in the form of a dust echo or as reprocessed radiation from a long-lived GRB remnant), and that the interaction of the explosion's shock/jet with the complex medium is the source of the extremely long prompt emission. However, current observations do not allow us to exclude the possibility that super-soft X-ray emitters originate from peculiar stellar progenitors with large radii that only form in very dusty environments.
  • We investigated the rest frame spectral lags of two complete samples of bright long (50) and short (6) gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected by Swift. We analysed the Swift/BAT data through a discrete cross-correlation function (CCF) fitted with an asymmetric Gaussian function to estimate the lag and the associated uncertainty. We find that half of the long GRBs have a positive lag and half a lag consistent with zero. All short GRBs have lags consistent with zero. The distributions of the spectral lags for short and long GRBs have different average values. Limited by the small number of short GRBs, we cannot exclude at more than 2 sigma significance level that the two distributions of lags are drawn from the same parent population. If we consider the entire sample of long GRBs, we do not find evidence for a lag-luminosity correlation, rather the lag-luminosity plane appears filled on the left hand side, thus suggesting that the lag-luminosity correlation could be a boundary. Short GRBs are consistent with the long ones in the lag-luminosity plane.
  • We present the results of a set of numerical simulations of long-duration gamma-ray burst jets associated with massive, compact stellar progenitors. The simulations extend to large radii and allow us to locate the region in which the peak frequency of the advected radiation is set before the radiation is released at the photosphere. Light curves and spectra are calculated for different viewing angles as well as different progenitor structures and jet properties. We find that the radiation released at the photosphere of matter-dominated jets is able to reproduce the observed Amati and energy-Lorentz factor correlations. Our simulations also predict a correlation between the burst energy and the radiative efficiency of the prompt phase, consistent with observations.
  • Long Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) signal the death of massive stars. The afterglow emission can be used to probe the progenitor ambient through a detailed study of the absorption pattern imprinted by the circumburst material as well as the host galaxy interstellar medium on the continuum spectrum. This has been done at optical wavelengths with impressive results. Similar studies can in principle be carried out in the X-ray band, allowing us to shed light on the material metallicity, composition and distance of the absorber. We start exploiting this route through high resolution spectroscopy XMM-Newton observations of GRB 090618. We find a high metallicity absorbing medium (Z> 0.2 Zsun) with possible enhancements of S and Ne with respect to the other elements (improving the fit at a level of >3.4 sigma). Including the metallicity effects on the X-ray column density determination, the X-ray and optical evaluations of the absorption are in agreement for a Small Magellanic Cloud extinction curve.
  • GRB080319B reached 5th optical magnitude during the burst prompt emission. Thanks to the VLT/UVES rapid response mode, we observed its afterglow just 8m:30s after the GRB onset when the magnitude was R ~ 12. This allowed us to obtain the best signal-to-noise, high resolution spectrum of a GRB afterglow ever (S/N per resolution element ~ 50). The spectrum is rich of absorption features belonging to the main system at z=0.937, divided in at least six components spanning a total velocity range of 100 km/s. The VLT/UVES observations caught the absorbing gas in a highly excited state, producing the strongest Fe II fine structure lines ever observed in a GRB. A few hours later the optical depth of these lines was reduced by a factor of 4-20, and the optical/UV flux by a factor of ~ 60. This proves that the excitation of the observed fine structure lines is due to "pumping" by the GRB UV photons. A comparison of the observed ratio between the number of photons absorbed by the excited state and those in the Fe II ground state suggests that the six absorbers are ~ 2-6 kpc from the GRB site, with component I ~ 3 times closer to the GRB site than components III to VI. Component I is characterized also by the lack of Mg I absorption, unlike all other components. This may be due both to a closer distance and a lower density, suggesting a structured ISM in this galaxy complex.
  • We present the results from an ESO/VLT campaign aimed at studying the afterglow properties of the short/hard gamma ray burst GRB 070707. Observations were carried out at ten different epochs from ~0.5 to ~80 days after the event. The optical flux decayed steeply with a power-law decay index greater than 3, later levelling off at R~27.3 mag; this is likely the emission level of the host galaxy, the faintest yet detected for a short GRB. Spectroscopic observations did not reveal any line features/edges that could unambiguously pinpoint the GRB redshift, but set a limit z < 3.6. In the range of allowed redshifts, the host has a low luminosity, comparable to that of long-duration GRBs. The existence of such faint host galaxies suggests caution when associating short GRBs with bright, offset galaxies, where the true host might just be too dim for detection. The steepness of the decay of the optical afterglow of GRB 070707 challenges external shock models for the optical afterglow of short/hard GRBs. We argue that this behaviour might results from prolonged activity of the central engine or require alternative scenarios.
  • 4U 2129+47 was discovered in the early 80's and classified as an accretion disk corona source due to its broad and partial X-ray eclipses. The 5.24 hr binary orbital period was inferred from the X-ray and optical light curve modulation, implying a late K or M spectral type companion star. The source entered a low state in 1983, during which the optical modulation disappeared and an F8 IV star was revealed, suggesting that 4U 2129+47 might be part of a triple system. The nature of 4U 2129+47 has since been investigated, but no definitive conclusion has been reached. Here, we present timing and spectral analyses of two XMM-Newton observations of this source, carried out in May and June, 2005. We find evidence for a delay between two mid-eclipse epochs measured ~22 days apart, and we show that this delay can be naturally explained as being due to the orbital motion of the binary 4U 2129+47 around the center of mass of a triple system. This result thus provides further support in favor of the triple nature of 4U 2129+47.
  • New information on short/hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is being gathered thanks to the discovery of their optical and X-ray afterglows. However, some key aspects are still poorly understood, including the collimation level of the outflow, the duration of the central engine activity, and the properties of the progenitor systems. We want to constrain the physical properties of the short GRB 050724 and of its host galaxy, and make some inferences on the global short GRB population. We present optical observations of the afterglow of GRB 050724 and of its host galaxy, significantly expanding the existing dataset for this event. We compare our results with models, complementing them with available measurements from the literature. We study the afterglow light curve and spectrum including X-ray data. We also present observations of the host galaxy. The observed optical emission was likely related to the large flare observed in the X-ray light curve. The apparent steep decay was therefore not due to the jet effect. Available data are indeed consistent with low collimation, in turn implying a large energy release, comparable to that of long GRBs. The flare properties also constrain the internal shock mechanism, requiring a large Lorentz factor contrast between the colliding shells. This implies that the central engine was active at late times, rather than ejecting all shells simultaneously. The host galaxy has red colors and no ongoing star formation, consistent with previous findings on this GRB. However, it is not a pure elliptical, and has some faint spiral structure. GRB 050724 provides the most compelling case for association between a short burst and a galaxy with old stellar population. It thus plays a pivotal role in constraining progenitors models, which should allow for long delays between birth and explosion.
  • We analyze high resolution spectroscopic observations of the optical afterglow of GRB050730, obtained with UVES@VLT about hours after the GRB trigger. The spectrum shows that the ISM of the GRB host galaxy at z = 3.967 is complex, with at least five components contributing to the main absorption system. We detect strong CII*, SiII*, OI* and FeII* fine structure absorption lines associated to the second and third component. For the first three components we derive information on the relative distance from the site of the GRB explosion. Component 1, which has the highest redshift, does not present any fine structure nor low ionization lines; it only shows very high ionization features, such as CIV and OVI, suggesting that this component is very close to the GRB site. From the analysis of low and high ionization lines and fine structure lines, we find evidences that the distance of component 2 from the site of the GRB explosion is 10-100 times smaller than that of component 3. We evaluated the mean metallicity of the z=3.967 system obtaining values about 0.01 of the solar metallicity or less. However, this should not be taken as representative of the circumburst medium, since the main contribution to the hydrogen column density comes from the outer regions of the galaxy while that of the other elements presumably comes from the ISM closer to the GRB site. Furthermore, difficulties in evaluating dust depletion correction can modify significantly these values. The mean [C/Fe] ratio agrees well with that expected by single star-formation event models. Interestingly the [C/Fe] of component 2 is smaller than that of component 3, in agreement with GRB dust destruction scenarios, if component 2 is closer than component 3 to the GRB site.
  • We studied the behaviour of the optical afterglow lightcurves of a sample of 24 Gamma--Ray Bursts (GRBs) with known redshift and published estimates of the optical extinction in the source frame, detected before the SWIFT satellite launch. We found an unexpected clustering of the optical luminosities at 12 hours in the source frame. The distribution of the optical luminosities is narrower than the distribution of X-ray luminosities at the same time. Few (3) bursts stand apart from the main optical distribution, being fainter by a factor of about 15. We also analysed the optical luminosities of the SWIFT burst with known redshift finding that the luminosity distribution is similar to the pre SWIFT GRBs one, even if they have a different mean redshift. These results can suggest the existence of a family of intrinsically optically under--luminous dark GRBs.
  • High resolution spectroscopy of GRB 021004 revealed a wealth of absorption lines from several intermediate ionization species. The velocity structure of the absorber is complex and material with velocity up to >3000 km/s is observed. Since only the blueshifted component is observed, the absorber is very likely to be material closely surrounding the gamma-ray burst. We use a time-dependent photoionization code to track the abundance of the ions over time. Thanks to the presence of absorption from intermediate ionization states at long times, we can estimate the location and mass of the components of the absorber. We interpret those constraints within the hypernova scenario showing that the mass loss rate of the progenitor must have been ~10^{-4} solar masses per year, suggestive of a very massive star. In addition, the wind termination shock must lie at a distance of at least 100 pc, implying a low density environment. The velocity structure of the absorber also requires clumping of the wind at those large distances.
  • Context. GRB050721 was detected by Swift and promptly followed-up, in the X-ray by Swift itself and, in the optical band, by the VLT operated, for the first time, in rapid response mode. A multiwavelength monitoring campaign was performed in order to study its afterglow behavior. Aims. We present the analysis of the early and late afterglow emission in both the X-ray and optical bands, as observed by Swift, a robotic telescope, and the VLT. We compare early observations with late afterglow observations obtained with Swift and the VLT in different bands in order to constrain the density of the medium in which the fireball is expanding. Methods. We have analyzed both the X-ray and the optical light curves and compared the spectral energy distribution of the afterglow at two different epochs. Results. We observed an intense rebrightening in the optical band at about one day after the burst which was not seen in the X-ray band. This is the first observation of a GRB afterglow in which a rebrightening is observed in the optical but not in the X-ray band. The lack of detection in X-ray of such a strong rebrightening at lower energies can be described with a variable external density profile. In such a scenario, the combined X-ray and optical observations allow us to derive the matter density at 10^15 cm from the burst. This is about a factor of 10 higher than in the inner region.
  • Short duration (<2 s) Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been a mystery since their discovery. Until May 2005 very little was known about short GRBs, but this situation has changed rapidly in the last few months since the Swift and HETE-2 satellites have made it possible to discover X-ray and optical counterparts to these sources. Positional associations indicate that short GRBs arise in close-by galaxies (z<0.7). Here we report on a detailed study of the short GRB 050724 X-ray afterglow. This burst shows strong flaring variability in the X-ray band. It clearly confirms early suggestions of X-ray activity in the 50-100 s time interval following the GRB onset seen with BATSE. Late flare activity is also observed. These observations support the idea that flares are related to the inner engine for short GRBs, as well as long GRBs.
  • As soon as it was realized that long GRBs lie at cosmological distances, attempts have been made to use them as cosmological probes. Besides their use as lighthouses, a task that presents mainly the technological challenge of a rapid deep high resolution follow-up, researchers attempted to find the Holy Grail: a way to create a standard candle from GRB observables. We discuss here the attempts and the discovery of the Ghirlanda correlation, to date the best method to standardize the GRB candle. Together with discussing the promises of this method, we will underline the open issues, the required calibrations and how to understand them and keep them under control. Even though GRB cosmology is a field in its infancy, ongoing work and studies will clarify soon if and how GRBs will be able to keep up to the promises.
  • Observations of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) with Swift produced the initially surprising result that many bursts have large X-ray flares superimposed on the underlying afterglow. These flares were sometimes intense, rapid, and late relative to the nominal prompt phase. The most intense of these flares was observed by XRT with a flux >500 the afterglow. This burst then surprised observers by flaring again after >10000 s. The intense flare can be most easily understood within the context of the standard fireball model, if the internal engine that powers the prompt GRB emission is still active at late times. Recent observations indicate that X-ray flares are detected in ~1/3 of XRT detected afterglows. By studying the properties of the varieties of flares (such as rise/fall time, onset time, spectral variability, etc.) and relating them to overall burst properties, models of flare production and the GRB internal engine can be constrained.
  • We present optical observations of the short/hard gamma-ray burst GRB 050709, the first such event with an identified optical counterpart. The object is coincident with a weak X-ray source and is located inside a galaxy at redshift z = 0.1606 +- 0.0002. Multiband photometry allowed us to study the broad-band spectral energy distribution. Late-time monitoring places strong limits on any supernova simultaneous with the GRB. The host galaxy is not of early type. Spectra show that the dominant stellar population is relatively young (~ 1 Gyr), and that ongoing star formation is present at a level of 2-3 (L/L*) Msun/yr. This is at least 2 orders of magnitude larger than that observed in the elliptical hosts of the short GRB 050509B and GRB 050724. This shows that at least some short GRBs originate in a young population. Short/hard GRB models based on the merger of a binary degenerate system are compatible with the host galaxy characteristics, although there is still the possibility of a connection between young stars and at least a fraction of such events.
  • Until recently, X-ray flares during the afterglow of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) were a rarely detected phenomenon, thus their nature is unclear. During the afterglow of GRB 050502B, the largest X-ray flare ever recorded rose rapidly above the afterglow lightcurve detected by the Swift X-ray Telescope. The peak flux of the flare was >500 times that of the underlying afterglow, and it occurred at >12 minutes after the nominal prompt burst emission. The fluence of this X-ray flare, (1.0 +/- 0.05) x 10^{-6} erg cm^{-2} in the 0.2-10.0 keV energy band, exceeded the fluence of the nominal prompt burst. The spectra during the flare were significantly harder than those measured before and after the flare. Later in time, there were additional flux increases detected above the underlying afterglow, as well as a break in the afterglow lightcurve. All evidence presented below, including spectral and particularly timing information during and around the giant flare, suggests that this giant flare was the result of internal dissipation of energy due to late central engine activity, rather than an afterglow-related effect. We also find that the data are consistent with a second central engine activity episode, in which the ejecta is moving slower than that of the initial episode, causing the giant flare and then proceeding to overtake and refresh the afterglow shock, thus causing additional activity at even later times in the lightcurve.
  • Gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitors are observationally linked to the death of massive stars. X-ray studies of the GRB afterglows can deepen our knowledge of the ionization status and metal abundances of the matter in the GRB environment. Moreover, the presence of local matter can be inferred through its fingerprints in the X-ray spectrum, i.e. the presence of absorption higher than the Galactic value. A few studies based on BeppoSAX and XMM-Newton found evidence of higher than Galactic values for the column density in a number of GRB afterglows. Here we report on a systematic analysis of 17 GRBs observed by Swift up to April 15, 2005. We observed a large number of GRBs with an excess of column density. Our sample, together with previous determinations of the intrinsic column densities for GRBs with known redshift, provides evidence for a distribution of absorption consistent with that predicted for randomly occurring GRB within molecular clouds.
  • [Abridged] Very recently, relations between the peak energy of Gamma-Ray Burst burst spectra, the isotropic-equivalent energy of the burst, and the radiated energy of the burst have been found. In a way that is exactly analogous to the way in which the relation between the peak luminosity and the rate of decline of the light curve of Type Ia supernovae can be used to make Type Ia supernovae excellent standard candles for cosmology, so too, the relations between Epk, Eiso, and Egamma point toward a methodology for using GRBs as excellent standard candles for cosmology. In addition, GRBs occur over the broad redshift range from z=0.1 to at least z=4.5, and both they and their afterglows are easily detectable out to z > 8. Thus GRBs show great promise as cosmological ``yardsticks'' to measure the rate of expansion of the universe over time, and therefore the properties of dark energy (i.e., Omega_M, Omega_Lambda, w_0, and w_a). We describe a concept for a possible MIDEX-class mission dedicated to using GRBs to constrain the properties of dark energy that would obtain these quantities for > 800 bursts in the redshift range 0.1 >~ z <~ 10 during a 2-year mission. This burst sample would enable both Omega_M and w_0 to be determined to +/- 0.07 and +/- 0.06 (68% CL), respectively, and w_a to be significantly constrained.
  • We review some open problems in the physics of afterglows, namely their polarization properties and the existence of dark/faint bursts. Polarization studies yield precious insights in the physical structure and dynamical evolution of GRB jets, revealing their magnetization properties and their energy profile. Polarimetric observations of GRB 020813 already allowed to exclude a homogeneous jet for this event. We then present observations of faint/dark bursts, showing that some of them may be obscured by dust, while others are possibly just intrinsically dim.
  • After many years of speculation, recent observations have confirmed the association of gamma-ray bursts with core-collapse supernova explosions from massive stars. This association carries with it important consequences. The burst relativistic jet has to propagate through the cold dense stellar material before it reaches the transparency radius and the burst photons are produced. This propagation is likely to affect the initial properties of the jet, shaping it and changing its energy composition. The variability injected at the base of the jet is also likely to be erased by the jet-star interaction. Despite this, GRBs seem to have remarkably predictable properties once the radiative phase sets in, as emphasized by the recent discovery of several tight correlation between spectral, geometric and energetic properties of the jet. In this contribution we discuss the jet interaction with the star, emphasizing its time-dependent properties and the resulting energy distribution. We finally emphasize the surprising predictability of jet and radiation properties outside the star and underline its implication for standardizing the GRB candle.
  • We present the first high resolution (R=20000--45000, corresponding to 14 km/s at 4200A to 6.6 km/s at 9000A) observations of the optical afterglow of Gamma Ray Bursts. GRB020813 and GRB021004 were observed by UVES@VLT 22.19 hours and 13.52 hours after the trigger, respectively. These spectra show that the inter--stellar matter of the GRB host galaxies is complex, with many components contributing to each main absorption system, and spanning a total velocity range of up to about 3000 km/s. Several narrow components are resolved down to a width of a few tens of km/s. In the case of GRB021004 we detected both low and high ionization lines. Combined with photoionization results obtained with CLOUDY, the ionization parameters of the various systems are consistent with a remarkably narrow range with no clear trend with system velocity. This can be interpreted as due to density fluctuations on top of a regular R^-2 wind density profile.