• We report on our further analysis of the expanded and revised sample of potential BL Lac objects (the 2BL) optically identified from two catalogues of blue-selected (UV excess) point sources, the 2dF and 6dF QSO Redshift Surveys (2QZ and 6QZ). The 2BL comprises 52 objects with no apparent proper motion, over the magnitude range 16.0 < bj< 20.0. Follow-up high signal-to-noise spectra of 36 2BL objects and NIR imaging of 18 objects, together with data for 19 2BL objects found in the Sloan Digital Sky survey (SDSS), show 17 objects to be stellar, while a further 16 objects have evidence of weak, broad emission features, although for at least one of these the continuum level has clearly varied. Classification of three objects remains uncertain,with NIR results indicating a marked reduction in flux as compared to SDSS optical magnitudes. Seven objects have neither high signal-to-noise spectra nor NIR imaging. Deep radio observations of 26 2BL objects at the VLA resulted in only three further radio-detections, however none of the three is classed as a featureless continuum object. Seven 2BL objects with a radio detection are confirmed as candidate BL Lac objects while one extragalactic (z=0.494) continuum object is undetected at radio frequencies. One further radio-undetected object is also a potential BL Lac candidate. However it would appear that there is no significant population of radio-quiet BL Lac objects.
  • High signal-to-noise spectroscopy has established a redshift of z=0.494 for the source 2QZJ215454.3-305654, originally selected from the 2dF/6dF QSO Redshift Surveys as one of 45 candidate BL Lac objects displaying a featureless continuum at optical wavelengths. Radio observations using the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 1.4 GHz place a 3\sigma upper limit on the object's radio flux density of approx 0.14mJy. The radio-to-optical flux ratio of this object is thus more than 7 times lower than the lowest such ratio observed in BL Lac objects. While the optical properties of 2QZJ215454.3-305654 are consistent with a BL Lac identification, the lack of radio and/or X-ray emission is not. It is uncertain whether this object is an AGN dominated by optical continuum emission from an accretion disk, or is similar to a BL Lac object with optical nonthermal emission from a relativistic jet.
  • We have optically identified a sample of 56 featureless continuum objects without significant proper motion from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ). The steep number--magnitude relation of the sample, $n(\bj) \propto 10^{0.7\bj}$, is similar to that derived for QSOs in the 2QZ and inconsistent with any population of Galactic objects. Follow up high resolution, high signal-to-noise, spectroscopy of five randomly selected objects confirms the featureless nature of these sources. Assuming the objects in the sample to be largely featureless AGN, and using the QSO evolution model derived for the 2QZ, we predict the median redshift of the sample to be $z=1.1$. This model also reproduces the observed number-magnitude relation of the sample using a renormalisation of the QSO luminosity function, $\Phi^* = \Phi^*_{\rm \sc qso}/66 \simeq 1.65 \times 10^{-8} $mag$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-3}$. Only $\sim$20 per cent of the objects have a radio flux density of $S_{1.4}>3 $mJy, and further VLA observations at 8.4 GHz place a $5\sigma$ limit of $S_{8.4} < 0.2$mJy on the bulk of the sample. We postulate that these objects could form a population of radio-weak AGN with weak or absent emission lines, whose optical spectra are indistinguishable from those of BL Lac objects.
  • We have imaged the emission from the near-infrared v=1-0 S(1), 1-0 S(7), 2-1 S(1) and 6-4 O(3) lines of molecular hydrogen in the N- and SW-Bars of M17, together with the hydrogen Br-gamma and Br-10 lines. This includes the first emission line image ever to be obtained of a line from the highly excited v=6 level of H2. In both Bars, the H2 emission is generally distributed in clumps along filamentary features. The 1-0 S(1) and 2-1 S(1) images have similar morphologies. Together with their relative line ratios, this supports a fluorescent origin for their emission, within a photodissociation region. The SW-Bar contains a clumpy medium, but in the N-Bar the density is roughly constant. The 1-0 S(7) line image is also similar to the 1-0 S(1) image, but the 6-4 O(3) image is significantly different to it. Since the emission wavelengths of these two lines are similar (1.748 to 1.733um), this cannot be due to differential extinction between the v=6 and the v=1 lines. We attribute the difference to the pumping of newly formed H2 into the v=6, or to a nearby, level. However, this also requires either a time-dependent photodissociation region (where molecule formation does not balance dissociation), rather than it to be in steady-state, and/or for the formation spectrum to vary with position in the source. If this interpretation of formation pumping of molecular hydrogen is correct, it is the first clear signature from this process to be seen.