• A novel geometry for a sampling calorimeter employing inorganic scintillators as an active medium is presented. To overcome the mechanical challenges of construction, an innovative light collection geometry has been pioneered, that minimises the complexity of construction. First test results are presented, demonstrating a successful signal extraction. The geometry consists of a sampling calorimeter with passive absorber layers interleaved with layers of an active medium made of inorganic scintillating crystals. Wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibres run along the four long, chamfered edges of the stack, transporting the light to photodetectors at the rear. To maximise the amount of scintillation light reaching the WLS fibres, the scintillator chamfers are depolished. It is shown herein that this concept is working for cerium fluoride (CeF$_3$) as a scintillator. Coupled to it, several different types of materials have been tested as WLS medium. In particular, materials that might be sufficiently resistant to the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider radiation environment, such as cerium-doped Lutetium-Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO) and cerium-doped quartz, are compared to conventional plastic WLS fibres. Finally, an outlook is presented on the possible optimisation of the different components, and the construction and commissioning of a full calorimeter cell prototype is presented.
  • Lutetium-Yttrium Orthosilicate doped with Cerium (LYSO:Ce), as a bright scintillating crystal, is a candidate for calorimetry applications in strong ionizing-radiation fields and large high-energy hadron fluences as are expected at the CERN Large Hadron Collider after the planned High-Luminosity upgrade. There, proton-proton collisions will produce fast hadron fluences up to ~5E14/cm^2 in the large-rapidity regions of the calorimeters. The performance of LYSO:Ce has been investigated, after exposure to different fluences of 24 GeV/c protons. Measured changes in optical transmission as a function of proton fluence are presented, and the evolution over time due to spontaneous recovery at room temperature is studied. The activation of materials will also be an issue in the described environment. Studies of the ambient dose induced by LYSO and its evolution with time, in comparison with other scintillating crystals, have also been performed through measurements and FLUKA simulations.
  • Scintillating ceramics are a promising, new development for various applications in science and industry. Their application in calorimetry for particle physics experiments is expected to involve an exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. In this paper, changes in performance have been measured for scintillating ceramic samples of different composition after exposure to penetrating ionizing radiation up to a dose of 38 kGy.
  • The anticipated performance of calorimeter crystals in the environment expected after the planned High-Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN has to be well understood, before informed decisions can be made on the need for detector upgrades. Throughout the years of running at the HL-LHC, the detectors will be exposed to considerable fluences of fast hadrons, that have been shown to cause cumulative transparency losses in Lead Tungstate scintillating crystals. In this study, we present direct evidence of the main underlying damage mechanism. Results are shown from a test that yields a direct insight into the nature of the hadron-specific damage in Lead Tungstate calorimeter crystals exposed to 24 GeV/c protons.
  • A Cerium Fluoride crystal produced during early R&D studies for calorimetry at the CERN Large Hadron Collider was exposed to a 24 GeV/c proton fluence Phi_p=(2.78 +- 0.20) x 10EE13 cm-2 and, after one year of measurements tracking its recovery, to a fluence Phi_p=(2.12 +- 0.15) x 10EE14 cm-2. Results on proton-induced damage to the crystal and its spontaneous recovery after both irradiations are presented here, along with some new, complementary data on proton-damage in Lead Tungstate. A comparison with FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation results is performed and a qualitative understanding of high-energy damage mechanism is attempted.
  • A Lead Tungstate crystal produced for the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at the LHC was cut into three equal-length sections. The central one was irradiated with 290 MeV/c positive pions up to a fluence of (5.67 +- 0.46)x10^13 /cm^2, while the other two were exposed to a 24 GeV/c proton fluence of (1.17 +- 0.11) x 10^13/ cm^2. The damage recovery in these crystals, stored in the dark at room temperature, has been followed over two years. The comparison of the radiation-induced changes in light transmission for these crystals shows that damage is proportional to the star densities produced by the irradiation.
  • Eight PbWO4 crystals produced for the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at LHC have been irradiated in a 20 GeV/c proton beam up to fluences of 5.4 E13 p/cm2. The damage recovery in these crystals, stored in the dark at room temperature, has been followed for over a year. Comparative irradiations with 60Co photons have been performed on seven other crystals using a dose rate of 1 kGy/h. The issue whether hadrons cause a specific damage to the scintillation mechanism has been studied through light output measurements on the irradiated crystals using cosmic rays. The correlation between light output changes and light transmission changes is measured to be the same for proton-irradiated crystals and for gamma-irradiated crystals. Thus, within the precision of the measurements and for the explored range of proton fluences, no additional, hadron-specific damage to the scintillation mechanism is observed.
  • Eight production quality PbWO4 crystals of CMS have been irradiated in a 20 GeV/c proton beam up to fluences of 5.4E13cm-2. The damage recovery in these crystals has been followed for over a year. Comparative irradiations with 60Co photons have been performed on seven other crystals using a dose rate of 1 kGy/h. In proton irradiated crystals the light transmission band-edge shifts and the induced absorption length is proportional to the inverse of the 4th power of the wavelength. In gamma-irradiated crystals the band-edge does not shift but formation of absorption bands is seen clearly. The absorption length induced by gamma-radiation in crystals verified to have excellent radiation hardness, saturates at a level below 0.5 m-1. In the case of protons, we observe no correlation with the pre-characterised radiation hardness of the crystals and the induced absorption increases linearly with fluence. After a fluence of 5E13 cm-2, an induced absorption length of approx. 15m-1 is seen with no sign of saturation. These observations provide strong evidence that high-energy protons create damage that cannot be reproduced with gamma-irradiation. However, these hadronic effects manifest themselves only at integral fluences well beyond 1E12cm-2 and most likely would escape undetected at lower fluences. A large fraction of the damage, both in proton- and gamma-irradiated crystals, is either stable or recovers very slowly.
  • We have exposed seven full length production quality crystals of the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the CMS detector to a 20 GeV/c proton beam at the CERN PS accelerator. The exposure was done at fluxes of 10**12 p/cm**2/h and 10**13 p/cm**2/h and integral fluences of 10**12 p/cm**2 and 10**13 p/cm**2 were reached at both rates. The light transmission of the crystals was measured after irradiation and suitable cooling time for induced radioactivity to decrease to a safe level. First results of these measurements are shown. The possible damage mechanisms are discussed and simulations based on one possible model are presented. The implications for long-term operation of CMS are discussed and it is shown that in the whole barrel and at least most of the ECAL endcap hadron damage alone - even if cumulative - should not cause the crystals to fail the CMS specification of an induced absorption coefficient muIND < 1.5 /m during the first 10 years of LHC operation.