• We present a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) survey of extended [O III] {\lambda}5007 emission for a sample of 12 nearby (z < 0.12), luminous Type 2 quasars (QSO2s), which we use to measure the extent and kinematics of their AGN-ionized gas. We find the size of the observed [O III] regions scale with luminosity in comparison to nearby, less luminous Seyfert galaxies and radially outflowing kinematics to exist in all targets. We report an average maximum outflow radius of $\sim$600 pc, with gas continuing to be kinematically influenced by the central AGN out to an average radius of $\sim$1130 pc. These findings question the effectiveness of AGN being capable of clearing material from their host bulge in the nearby universe and suggest that disruption of gas by AGN activity may prevent star formation without requiring evacuation. Additionally, we find a dichotomy in our targets when comparing [O III] radial extent and nuclear FWHM, where QSO2s with compact [O III] morphologies typically possess broader nuclear emission-lines.
  • We present two-dimensional maps of emission-line fluxes and kinematics, as well as of the stellar kinematics of the central few kpc of five bright nearby Seyfert galaxies -- Mrk\,6, Mrk\,79, Mrk\,348, Mrk\,607 and Mrk\,1058 -- obtained from observations with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) Integral Field Unit (IFU) on the Gemini North Telescope. The data cover the inner 3\farcs5$\times$5\farcs0 -- corresponding to physical scales in the range 0.6$\times$0.9 to 1.5$\times$2.2\,kpc$^2$ -- at a spatial resolution ranging from 110 to 280 pc with a spectral coverage of 4300 -- 7100\,\AA\ and velocity resolution of $\approx$ 90\,km\,s$^{-1}$. The gas excitation is Seyfert like everywhere but show excitation, but show excitation gradients that are correlated with the gas kinematics, reddening and/or the gas density. The gas kinematics show in all cases two components: a rotation one similar to that observed in the stellar velocity field, and an outflow component. In the case of Mrk607, the gas is counter-rotating relative to the stars. Enhanced gas velocity dispersion is observed in association to the outflows according to two patterns: at the locations of the highest outflow velocities along the ionization axis or perpendicularly to it in a strip centered at the nucleus that we attribute to an equatorial outflow. Bipolar outflows are observed in Mrk\,348 and Mrk\,79, while in Mrk\,1058 only the blueshifted part is clearly observed, while in the cases of Mrk\,6 and Mrk\,607 the geometry of the outflow needs further constraints from modeling to be presented in a forthcoming study, where the mass flow rate and powers will also be obtained.
  • We present a near infrared study of the spectral components of the continuum in the inner 500$\times$500 pc$^2$ of the nearby Seyfert galaxy Mrk573 using adaptive optics near-infrared integral field spectroscopy with the instrument NIFS of the Gemini North Telescope at a spatial resolution of $\sim$50 pc. We performed spectral synthesis using the {\sc starlight} code and constructed maps for the contributions of different age components of the stellar population: young ($age\leq100$ Myr), young-intermediate ($100<age\leq700$ Myr), intermediate-old ($700$ Myr $<age\leq2$ Gyr) and old ($age>2$ Gyr) to the near-IR K-band continuum, as well as their contribution to the total stellar mass. We found that the old stellar population is dominant within the inner 250 pc, while the intermediate age components dominate the continuum at larger distances. A young stellar component contributes up to $\sim$20% within the inner $\sim$70 pc, while hot dust emission and featureless continuum components are also necessary to fit the nuclear spectrum, contributing up to 20% of the K-band flux there. The radial distribution of the different age components in the inner kiloparsec of Mrk573 is similar to those obtained by our group for the Seyfert galaxies Mrk1066, Mrk1157 and NGC1068 in previous works using a similar methodology. Young stellar populations ($\leq$100 Myr) are seen in the inner 200-300 pc for all galaxies contributing with $\ge$20% of the K-band flux, while the near-IR continuum is dominated by the contribution of intermediate-age stars ($t=$100 Myr-2 Gyr) at larger distances. Older stellar populations dominate in the inner 250 pc.
  • L. Pei, M. M. Fausnaugh, A. J. Barth, B. M. Peterson, M. C. Bentz, G. De Rosa, K. D. Denney, M. R. Goad, C. S. Kochanek, K. T. Korista, G. A. Kriss, R. W. Pogge, V. N. Bennert, M. Brotherton, K. I. Clubb, E. Dalla Bontà, A. V. Filippenko, J. E. Greene, C. J. Grier, M. Vestergaard, W. Zheng, Scott M. Adams, Thomas G. Beatty, A. Bigley, Jacob E. Brown, Jonathan S. Brown, G. Canalizo, J. M. Comerford, Carl T. Coker, E. M. Corsini, S. Croft, K. V. Croxall, A. J. Deason, Michael Eracleous, O. D. Fox, E. L. Gates, C. B. Henderson, E. Holmbeck, T. W.-S. Holoien, J. J. Jensen, C. A. Johnson, P. L. Kelly, S. Kim, A. King, M. W. Lau, Miao Li, Cassandra Lochhaas, Zhiyuan Ma, E. R. Manne-Nicholas, J. C. Mauerhan, M. A. Malkan, R. McGurk, L. Morelli, Ana Mosquera, Dale Mudd, F. Muller Sanchez, M. L. Nguyen, P. Ochner, B. Ou-Yang, A. Pancoast, Matthew T. Penny, A. Pizzella, Radosław Poleski, Jessie Runnoe, B. Scott, Jaderson S. Schimoia, B. J. Shappee, I. Shivvers, Gregory V. Simonian, A. Siviero, Garrett Somers, Daniel J. Stevens, M. A. Strauss, Jamie Tayar, N. Tejos, T. Treu, J. Van Saders, L. Vican, S. Villanueva Jr., H. Yuk, N. L. Zakamska, W. Zhu, M. D. Anderson, P. Arévalo, C. Bazhaw, S. Bisogni, G. A. Borman, M. C. Bottorff, W. N. Brandt, A. A. Breeveld, E. M. Cackett, M. T. Carini, D. M. Crenshaw, A. De Lorenzo-Cáceres, M. Dietrich, R. Edelson, N. V. Efimova, J. Ely, P. A. Evans, G. J. Ferland, K. Flatland, N. Gehrels, S. Geier, J. M. Gelbord, D. Grupe, A. Gupta, P. B. Hall, S. Hicks, D. Horenstein, Keith Horne, T. Hutchison, M. Im, M. D. Joner, J. Jones, J. Kaastra, S. Kaspi, B. C. Kelly, J. A. Kennea, M. Kim, S. C. Kim, S. A. Klimanov, J. C. Lee, D. C. Leonard, P. Lira, F. MacInnis, S. Mathur, I. M. McHardy, C. Montouri, R. Musso, S. V. Nazarov, H. Netzer, R. P. Norris, J. A. Nousek, D. N. Okhmat, I. Papadakis, J. R. Parks, J.-U. Pott, S. E. Rafter, H.-W. Rix, D. A. Saylor, K. Schnülle, S. G. Sergeev, M. Siegel, A. Skielboe, M. Spencer, D. Starkey, H.-I. Sung, K. G. Teems, C. S. Turner, P. Uttley, C. Villforth, Y. Weiss, J.-H. Woo, H. Yan, S. Young, Y. Zu
    Feb. 3, 2017 astro-ph.GA
    We present the results of an optical spectroscopic monitoring program targeting NGC 5548 as part of a larger multi-wavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The campaign spanned six months and achieved an almost daily cadence with observations from five ground-based telescopes. The H$\beta$ and He II $\lambda$4686 broad emission-line light curves lag that of the 5100 $\AA$ optical continuum by $4.17^{+0.36}_{-0.36}$ days and $0.79^{+0.35}_{-0.34}$ days, respectively. The H$\beta$ lag relative to the 1158 $\AA$ ultraviolet continuum light curve measured by the Hubble Space Telescope is roughly $\sim$50% longer than that measured against the optical continuum, and the lag difference is consistent with the observed lag between the optical and ultraviolet continua. This suggests that the characteristic radius of the broad-line region is $\sim$50% larger than the value inferred from optical data alone. We also measured velocity-resolved emission-line lags for H$\beta$ and found a complex velocity-lag structure with shorter lags in the line wings, indicative of a broad-line region dominated by Keplerian motion. The responses of both the H$\beta$ and He II $\lambda$4686 emission lines to the driving continuum changed significantly halfway through the campaign, a phenomenon also observed for C IV, Ly $\alpha$, He II(+O III]), and Si IV(+O IV]) during the same monitoring period. Finally, given the optical luminosity of NGC 5548 during our campaign, the measured H$\beta$ lag is a factor of five shorter than the expected value implied by the $R_\mathrm{BLR} - L_\mathrm{AGN}$ relation based on the past behavior of NGC 5548.
  • We conduct a multiwavelength continuum variability study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 to investigate the temperature structure of its accretion disk. The 19 overlapping continuum light curves (1158 to 9157 angstroms) combine simultaneous HST , Swift , and ground-based observations over a 180 day period from 2014 January to July. Light-curve variability is interpreted as the reverberation response of the accretion disk to irradiation by a central time-varying point source. Our model yields the disk inclination, i, temperature T1 at 1 light day from the black hole, and a temperature-radius slope, alpha. We also infer the driving light curve and find that it correlates poorly with both the hard and soft X-ray light curves, suggesting that the X-rays alone may not drive the ultraviolet and optical variability over the observing period. We also decompose the light curves into bright, faint, and mean accretion-disk spectra. These spectra lie below that expected for a standard blackbody accretion disk accreting at L/LEdd = 0.1
  • We investigate the relationship between the long term X-ray spectral variability in the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151 and its intrinsic absorption, by comparing the 2014 simultaneous ultraviolet/X-Ray observations taken with Hubble STIS Echelle and Chandra HETGS with archival observations from Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku. The observations are divided into "high" and "low" states, with the low states showing strong and unabsorbed extended emission at energies below 2 keV. Our X-ray model consists of a broken powerlaw, neutral reflection and the two dominant absorption components identified by Kraemer et al. (2005), hereafter KRA2005, X-High and D+Ea, which are present in all epochs. The model fittings suggest that the absorbers are very stable, with the principal changes in the intrinsic absorption resulting from variations in the ionization state of the gas as the ionizing continuum varies. However, the low states show evidence of larger column densities in one or both of the absorbers. Among plausible explanations for the column increase, we discuss the possibility of an expanding/contracting X-ray corona. As suggested by KRA2005, there seem to be contributions from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) winds to the mass outflow. Along with the ultra fast outflow absorber identified by Tombesi et al. (2010), X-High is consistent with being magnetically driven. On the other hand, it is unlikely that D+Ea is part of the MHD flow, and it is possible that it is radiatively accelerated. These results suggest that at a sufficiently large radial distance there is a break point between MHD-dominated and radiatively driven outflows.
  • We present ground-based optical photometric monitoring data for NGC 5548, part of an extended multi-wavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The light curves have nearly daily cadence from 2014 January to July in nine filters (\emph{BVRI} and \emph{ugriz}). Combined with ultraviolet data from the \emph{Hubble Space Telescope} and \emph{Swift}, we confirm significant time delays between the continuum bands as a function of wavelength, extending the wavelength coverage from 1158\,\AA\ to the $z$ band ($\sim\!9160$\,\AA). We find that the lags at wavelengths longer than the {\it V} band are equal to or greater than the lags of high-ionization-state emission lines (such as He\,{\sc ii}\,$\lambda 1640$ and $\lambda 4686$), suggesting that the continuum-emitting source is of a physical size comparable to the inner broad-line region (BLR). The trend of lag with wavelength is broadly consistent with the prediction for continuum reprocessing by an accretion disk with $\tau \propto \lambda^{4/3}$. However, the lags also imply a disk radius that is 3 times larger than the prediction from standard thin-disk theory, assuming that the bolometric luminosity is 10\% of the Eddington luminosity ($L = 0.1L_{\rm Edd}$). Using optical spectra from the Large Binocular Telescope, we estimate the bias of the interband continuum lags due to BLR emission observed in the filters. We find that the bias for filters with high levels of BLR contamination ($\sim\! 20\%$) can be important for the shortest continuum lags, and likely has a significant impact on the {\it u} and {\it U} bands owing to Balmer continuum emission.
  • We describe the first results from a six-month long reverberation-mapping experiment in the ultraviolet based on 170 observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. Significant correlated variability is found in the continuum and broad emission lines, with amplitudes ranging from ~30% to a factor of two in the emission lines and a factor of three in the continuum. The variations of all the strong emission lines lag behind those of the continuum, with He II 1640 lagging behind the continuum by ~2.5 days and Lyman alpha 1215, C IV 1550, and Si IV 1400 lagging by ~5-6 days. The relationship between the continuum and emission lines is complex. In particular, during the second half of the campaign, all emission-line lags increased by a factor of 1.3-2 and differences appear in the detailed structure of the continuum and emission-line light curves. Velocity-resolved cross-correlation analysis shows coherent structure in lag versus line-of-sight velocity for the emission lines; the high-velocity wings of C IV respond to continuum variations more rapidly than the line core, probably indicating higher velocity BLR clouds at smaller distances from the central engine. The velocity-dependent response of Lyman alpha, however, is more complex and will require further analysis.
  • Recent intensive Swift monitoring of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 yielded 282 usable epochs over 125 days across six UV/optical bands and the X-rays. This is the densest extended AGN UV/optical continuum sampling ever obtained, with a mean sampling rate <0.5 day. Approximately daily HST UV sampling was also obtained. The UV/optical light curves show strong correlations (r_max = 0.57 - 0.90) and the clearest measurement to date of interband lags. These lags are well-fit by a \tau propto \lambda^4/3 wavelength dependence, with a normalization that indicates an unexpectedly large disk radius of 0.35 +/- 0.05 lt-day at 1367 A, assuming a simple face-on model. The U-band shows a marginally larger lag than expected from the fit and surrounding bands, which could be due to Balmer continuum emission from the broad-line region as suggested by Korista and Goad. The UV/X-ray correlation is weaker (r_max < 0.45) and less consistent over time. This indicates that while Swift is beginning to measure UV/optical lags in general agreement with accretion disk theory (although the derived size is larger than predicted), the relationship with X-ray variability is less well understood. Combining this accretion disk size estimate with those from quasar microlensing studies suggests that AGN disk sizes scale approximately linearly with central black hole mass over a wide range of masses.
  • We present the results of recent Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations of the nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3783 which shows a strong, non-varying X-ray warm absorber and physically related and kinematically varying UV absorption. We compare our new observations to high-resolution, high signal-to-noise archival data from 2001, allowing a unique investigation into the long-term variations of the absorption over a 12 yr period. We find no statistically significant changes in the physical properties of the X-ray absorber, but there is a significant drop of ~40% in the UV and X-ray flux, and a significant flattening of the underlying X-ray power-law slope. Large kinematic changes are seen in the UV absorbers, possibly due to radial deceleration of the material. Similar behavior is not observed in the X-ray data, likely due to its lower velocity resolution, which shows an outflow velocity of v ~ -655 km/s in both epochs. The narrow iron K-alpha emission line at 6.4 keV shows no variation between epochs, and its measured width places the material producing the line at a radial distance of ~0.03 pc from the central black hole.
  • We present an investigation into the impact of feedback from outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in nearby z < 0.04 AGN. From studies of the kinematics, physical conditions, and variability of the absorbers in the literature, we calculate the possible ranges in total mass outflow rate and kinetic luminosity for each AGN, summed over all of its absorbers. These calculations make use of values (or limits) for the radial locations of the absorbers determined from variability, excited-state absorption, and other considerations. From a sample of 10 Seyfert 1 galaxies with detailed photoionization models for their absorbers, we find that 7 have sufficient constraints on the absorber locations to determine feedback parameters. For the low-luminosity AGN NGC 4395, these values are low, although we do not have sufficient constraints on the X-ray absorbers to make definitive conclusions. At least 5 of the 6 Seyfert 1s with moderate bolometric luminosities have mass outflow rates that are 10 - 1000 times the mass accretion rates needed to generate their observed luminosities, indicating that most of the mass outflow originates from outside the inner accretion disk. Three of these (NGC 4051, NGC 3516, and NGC 3783) have kinetic luminosities in the range 0.5 to 5% bolometric, which is the range typically required by feedback models for efficient self-regulation of black-hole and galactic bulge growth. At least 2 of the other 3 (NGC 5548, NGC 4151, and NGC 7469) have kinetic luminosities > 0.1% bolometric, although these values may increase if radial locations can be determined for more of the absorbers. We conclude that the outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in moderate-luminosity AGN have the potential to deliver significant feedback to their environments.
  • We present the results of a deep 300 ks Chandra HETG observation of the highly variable narrow-line Seyfert Type 1 galaxy NGC 4051. The HETG spectrum reveals 28 significant soft X-ray ionised lines in either emission or absorption; primarily originating from H-like and He-like K-shell transitions of O, Ne, Mg and Si (including higher order lines and strong forbidden emission lines from O VII and Ne IX) plus high ionisation L-shell transitions from Fe XVII to Fe XXII and lower ionisation inner-shell lines (e.g. O VI). Modelling the data with XSTAR requires four distinct ionisation zones for the gas, all outflowing with velocities < 1000 km/s. A selection of the strongest emission/absorption lines appear to be resolved with FWHM of ~600 km/s. We also present the results from a quasi-simultaneous 350 ks Suzaku observation of NGC 4051 where the XIS spectrum reveals strong evidence for blueshifted absorption lines at ~6.8 and ~7.1 keV, consistent with previous findings. Modelling with XSTAR suggests that this is the signature of a highly ionised, high velocity outflow (log \xi ~ 4.1; v ~ -0.02c) which potentially may have a significant effect on the host galaxy environment via feedback. Finally, we also simultaneously model the broad-band 2008 XIS+HXD Suzaku data with archival Suzaku data from 2005 when the source was observed to have entered an extended period of low flux in an attempt to analyse the cause of the long-term spectral variability. We find that we can account for this by allowing for large variations in the normalisation of the intrinsic power-law component which may be interpreted as being due to significant changes in the covering fraction of a Compton-thick partial-coverer obscuring the central continuum emission.
  • We focus on determining the underlying physical cause of a Seyfert galaxy's appearance as type a 1.8 or 1.9. Are these "intermediate" Seyfert types typical Seyfert 1 nuclei with reddened broad-line regions? Or are they objects with intrinsically weak continua and broad emission lines? We compare measurements of the optical reddening of the narrow and broad-line regions with each other and with the X-ray column derived from XMM-Newton 0.5-10 keV spectra to determine the presence and location of dust in the line of sight. We also searched the literature to see if the objects showed evidence for broad-line variability, and determined if the changes were consistent with a change in reddening or a change in the intrinsic ionizing continuum flux. We find that 10 of 19 objects previously classified as Seyfert 1.8/1.9s received this designation due to their low continuum flux. In four objects the classification was due to BLR reddening, either by the torus or dust structures in the vicinity of the NLR; in the remaining five objects there is not sufficient evidence to favor one scenario over the other. These findings imply that, in general, samples of 1.8/1.9s are not suitable for use in studies of the gas and dust in the central torus.
  • We present a study of the outflowing ionized gas in the resolved narrow-line region (NLR) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 573, and its interaction with an in- ner dust/gas disk, based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 and STIS observations. From the spectroscopic and imaging information, we determined the fundamental geometry of the outflow and inner disk, via two modeling pro- grams used to recreate the morphology of these regions imaged with HST. We also determined that the bicone of ionizing radiation from the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) intersects with the inner disk, illuminating a section of the disk including inner segments of spiral arms, fully seen through structure mapping, which appear to be outflowing and expanding. In addition, we see high velocities at projected distances of \geq 2'' (- 700 pc) from the nucleus, which could be due to rotation or to in situ acceleration of gas off the spiral arms. We find that the true half opening angle of the ionizing bicone (53 degrees) is much larger than the apparent half-opening angle (34 degrees) due to the above geometry, which may apply to a number of other Seyferts as well.
  • An analysis of archival mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra of Seyfert galaxies from the Spitzer Space Telescope observations is presented. We characterize the nature of the mid-IR active nuclear continuum by subtracting a template starburst spectrum from the Seyfert spectra. The long wavelength part of the spectrum contains a strong contribution from the starburst-heated cool dust; this is used to effectively separate starburst-dominated Seyferts from those dominated by the active nuclear continuum. Within the latter category, the strength of the active nuclear continuum drops rapidly beyond ~ 20 micron. On average, type 2 Seyferts have weaker short-wavelength active nuclear continua as compared to type 1 Seyferts. Type 2 Seyferts can be divided into two types, those with strong poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands and those without. The latter type show polarized broad emission lines in their optical spectra. The PAH-dominated type 2 Seyferts and Seyfert 1.8/1.9s show very similar mid-IR spectra. However, after the subtraction of the starburst component, there is a striking similarity in the active nuclear continuum of all Seyfert optical types. PAH-dominated Seyfert 2s and Seyfert 1.8/1.9s tend to show weak active nuclear continua in general. A few type 2 Seyferts with weak/absent PAH bands show a bump in the spectrum between 15 and 20 micron. We suggest that this bump is the peak of a warm (~200 K) blackbody dust emission, which becomes clearly visible when the short-wavelength continuum is weaker. This warm blackbody emission is also observed in other Seyfert optical subtypes, suggesting a common origin in these active galactic nuclei.
  • We have examined the physical conditions within a bright emission-line knot in the inner narrow-line region (NLR) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 573 using optical spectra and photoionization models. The spectra were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph with the G430L and G750M gratings. Comparing the spatial emission-line profiles, we found [Fe X] 6734 barely resolved, [O III] 5007 centrally peaked, but broader than [Fe X], and [O II] 3727 the most extended. The spectra reveal that [Fe X] is broader in velocity width and blue-shifted compared with lines from less ionized species. Our estimate of the bolometric luminosity indicates that the active galactic nucleus (AGN) is radiating at or above its Eddington Luminosity, which is consistent with its identification as a hidden Narrow-Line Seyfert 1. We were able to successfully match the observed emission line ratios with a three-component photoionization model. Two components, one to account for the [O III] emission and another in which the [Fe X] arises, are directly ionized by the AGN, while [O II] forms in a third component, which is ionized by a heavily absorbed continuum. Based on our assumed ionizing continuum and the model parameters, we determined that the two directly-ionized components are ~ 55 pc from the AGN. We have found similar radial distances for the central knots in the Seyfert 2 galaxies Mrk 3 and NGC 1068, but much smaller radial distances for the inner NLR in the Seyfert 1 galaxies NGC 4151 and NGC 5548. Although in general agreement with the unified model, these results suggest that the obscuring material in Seyfert galaxies extends out to at least tens of parsecs from the AGN.
  • New spectra of NGC 2992 from the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory show that this nearby AGN has changed its type classification to a Seyfert 2 in 2006. It was originally classified as a Seyfert 1.9, and has been previously seen as a Seyfert 1.5 with strong broad Halpha emission. A comparison of the reddening and equivalent hydrogen column density derived for the narrow-line region from these new data with those previously calculated for different regions closer to the nucleus shows them to be very similar, and suggests that these different regions are all being absorbed by the same opacity source, a large 100-pc scale dust lane running across the nucleus. However, obscuration by dust in this lane is probably not responsible for classification changes which occur in only a few years. It is more likely that NGC 2992's observed variations are due to a highly variable ionizing continuum. We therefore conclude that, although NGC 2992 was originally identified as a Seyfert 1.9, this was not because of an oblique viewing angle through the atmosphere of a central dusty torus, but because its active nucleus was identified when it was in a low continuum state.
  • We present results from Hubble Space Telescope UV spectroscopy of the massive X-ray binary system, HD226868 = Cyg X-1. The spectra were obtained at both orbital conjunction phases in two separate runs in 2002 and 2003 when the system was in the X-ray high/soft state. The stellar wind lines suffer large reductions in strength when the black hole is in the foreground due to the X-ray ionization of the wind ions. A comparison of HST and archival IUE spectra shows that similar photoionization effects occur in both the X-ray states. We constructed model UV wind line profiles assuming that X-ray ionization occurs everywhere in the wind except the zone where the supergiant blocks the X-ray flux. The good match between the observed and model profiles indicates that the wind ionization extends to near to the hemisphere of the supergiant facing the X-ray source. The H-alpha emission strength is generally lower in the high/soft state compared to the low/hard state, but the He II 4686 emission is relatively constant between states. The results suggest that mass transfer in Cyg X-1 is dominated by a focused wind flow that peaks along the axis joining the stars and that the stellar wind contribution is shut down by X-ray photoionization effects. The strong stellar wind from the shadowed side of the supergiant will stall when Coriolis deflection brings the gas into the region of X-ray illumination. This stalled gas component may be overtaken by the orbital motion of the black hole and act to inhibit accretion from the focused wind. The variations in the strength of the shadow wind component may then lead to accretion rate changes that ultimately determine the X-ray state.
  • We present Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared spectra of 12 Seyfert 1.8 and 1.9 galaxies over the 5-38 um region. We compare the spectral characteristics of this sample to those of 58 Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies from the Spitzer archives. An analysis of the spectral shapes, the silicate 10 um feature and the emission line fluxes have enabled us to characterize the mid-IR properties of Seyfert 1.8/1.9s. We find that the equivalent widths of the 10 um silicate feature are generally weak in all Seyfert galaxies, as previously reported by several studies. The few Seyfert galaxies in this sample that show deep 10 um silicate absorption features are highly inclined and/or merging galaxies. It is likely that these absorption features originate primarily in the dusty interstellar medium of the host galaxy rather than in a dusty torus on parsec scales close to the central engine. We find that the equivalent width of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) band at 6.2 um correlates strongly with the 20-30 um spectral index. Either of these quantities are good indicators of the amount of starburst contribution to the mid-IR spectra. The spectra of Seyfert 1.8 and 1.9s are dominated by these starburst features, similar to most Seyfert 2s. They show strong PAH bands and a strong red continuum toward 30 um. The strengths of the high-ionization forbidden narrow emission lines [O IV] 25.89 um, [Ne III] 15.56 um and [Ne V] 14.32 um relative to [Ne II] 12.81 um are weaker in Seyfert 1.8/1.9s and Seyfert 2s as compared to Seyfert 1s. The weakness of high-ionization lines in Seyfert 1.8-1.9s is suggestive of intrinsically weak active galactic nuclei (AGN) continua, and/or stronger star formation activity leading to enhanced [Ne II]. We discuss the implications of these observational results in the context of the Unified Model of AGN.
  • We present dynamical models based on a study of high-resolution long-slit spectra of the narrow-line region (NLR) in NGC 1068 obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) aboard The Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The dynamical models consider the radiative force due to the active galactic nucleus (AGN), gravitational forces from the supermassive black hole (SMBH), nuclear stellar cluster, and galactic bulge, and a drag force due to the NLR clouds interacting with a hot ambient medium. The derived velocity profile of the NLR gas is compared to that obtained from our previous kinematic models of the NLR using a simple biconical geometry for the outflowing NLR clouds. The results show that the acceleration profile due to radiative line driving is too steep to fit the data and that gravitational forces along cannot slow the clouds down, but with drag forces included, the clouds can slow down to the systemic velocity over the range 100--400 pc, as observed. However, we are not able to match the gradual acceleration of the NLR clouds from ~0 to ~100 pc, indicating the need for additional dynamical studies.
  • We present a study of high-resolution long-slit spectra of the narrow-line region (NLR) in NGC 1068 obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) aboard The Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The spectra were retrieved from the Multimission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST) obtained from two visits and seven orbits of HST time. We also obtained MERLIN radio maps of the center of NGC 1068 to examine the dependence of the NLR cloud velocities on the radio structure. The radial velocities and velocity dispersions of the bright NLR clouds appear to be unaffected by the radio knots, indicating that the radio jet is not the principal driving force on the outflowing NLR clouds. However, the velocities of the fainter NLR clouds are split near knots in the jet, indicating a possible interaction. Biconical outflow models were generated to match the data and for comparison to previous models done with lower dispersion observations. The general trend is an increase in radial velocity roughly proportional to distance from the nucleus followed by a linear decrease after roughly 100 parsec similar to that seen in other Seyfert galaxies, indicating common acceleration/deceleration mechanisms.
  • We present the results from our 140 ks XMM-Newton and 500 ks Chandra observation of NGC 5548. The velocity structure of the X-ray absorber is consistent with the velocity structure measured in the simultaneous UV spectra. In the X-rays we can separate the highest outflow velocity component, -1040 km/s, from the other velocity components. This velocity component spans at least three orders of magnitude in ionization parameter, producing both highly ionized X-ray absorption lines (Mg XII, Si XIV) and UV absorption lines. A similar conclusion is very probable for the other four velocity components. We show that the lower ionized absorbers are not in pressure equilibrium with the rest of the absorbers. Instead, a model with a continuous distribution of column density versus ionization parameter gives an excellent fit to our data.
  • We present results on the location, physical conditions, and geometry of the outflow in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3783 from a study of the variable intrinsic UV absorption. Based on 18 observations with HST/STIS and 6 observations with FUSE, we find: 1) The absorption from the lowest-ionization species in each of the three strong kinematic components varied inversely with the continuum flux, indicating the ionization structure responded to changes in the photoionizing flux over the weekly timescales sampled by our observations. 2) A multi- component model with an unocculted NLR and separate BLR and continuum line-of-sight covering factors predicts saturation in several lines, consistent with the lack of observed variability. 3) Column densities for the individual metastable levels are measured from the resolved C III *1175 absorption complex observed in one component. Based on our computed metastable level populations, the electron density of this absorber is ~3x10^4 cm^-3. Photoionization modeling results place it at ~25 pc from the central source. 4) Using time-dependent calculations, we are able to reproduce the detailed variability observed in this absorber, and derive upper limits on the distances for the other components of 25-50 pc. 5) The ionization parameters derived for the higher ionization UV absorbers are consistent with the modeling results for the lowest-ionization X-ray component, but with smaller total column density. They have similar pressures as the three X-ray ionization components. These results are consistent with an inhomogeneous wind model for the outflow in NGC 3783. 6) Based on the predicted emission-line luminosities, global covering factor constraints, and distances derived for the UV absorbers, they may be identified with emission- line gas observed in the inner NLR of AGNs. (abridged)
  • We present the results from a 500 ks Chandra observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. We detect broadened emission lines of O VII and C VI in the spectra, similar to those observed in the optical and UV bands. The source was continuously variable, with a 30 % increase in luminosity in the second half of the observation. No variability in the warm absorber was detected between the spectra from the first 170 ks and the second part of the observation. The velocity structure of the X-ray absorber is consistent with the velocity structure measured simultaneously in the ultraviolet spectra. We find that the highest velocity outflow component, at -1040 km/s, becomes increasingly important for higher ionization parameters. This velocity component spans at least three orders of magnitude in ionization parameter, producing both highly ionized X-ray absorption lines (Mg XII, Si XIV) as well as UV absorption lines. A similar conclusion is very probable for the other four velocity components. Based upon our observations, we argue that the warm absorber probably does not manifest itself in the form of photoionized clumps in pressure equilibrium with a surrounding wind. Instead, a model with a continuous distribution of column density versus ionization parameter gives an excellent fit to our data. From the shape of this distribution and the assumption that the mass loss through the wind should be smaller than the accretion rate onto the black hole, we derive upper limits to the solid angle as small as 10^{-4} sr. From this we argue that the outflow occurs in density-stratified streamers. The density stratification across the stream then produces the wide range of ionization parameter observed in this source. Abridged.
  • We present a detailed spectral analysis of the data obtained from NGC 3783 during the period 2000-2001 using Chandra. This analysis leads us to the following results. 1) NGC 3783 fluctuated in luminosity by a factor ~1.5 during individual observations (~170 ks duration). These fluctuations were not associated with significant spectral variations. 2) On a longer time scale (20-120 days), we found the source to exhibit two very different spectral shapes. The main difference between these can be well-described by the appearance and disappearance of a spectral component that dominates the underlying continuum at the longest wavelengths. The spectral variations are not related to the brightening or the fading of the continuum at short wavelengths in any simple way. 3) The appearance of the soft continuum component is consistent with being the only spectral variation, and there is no need to invoke changes in the opacity of the absorbers. 4) Photoionization modeling indicates that a combination of three ionized absorbers, each split into two kinematic components, can explain the strengths of almost all the absorption lines and bound-free edges. All three components are thermally stable and seem to have the same gas pressure. 5) The only real discrepancy between our model and the observations concerns the range of wavelengths absorbed by the iron M-shell UTA feature. This most likely arises as the result of our underestimation of the poorly-known dielectronic recombination rates appropriate for these ions. 6) The lower limit on the distance of the absorbing gas in NGC 3783 is between 0.2 and 3.2 pc. The assumption of pressure equilibrium imposes an upper limit of about 25 pc on the distance of the least-ionized component from the central source. (abridged)